Chaminda Vaas is easily the most penetrative and successful new-ball bowler Sri Lanka has had. He swung and seamed the ball with skill, his trademark delivery being the late in dipper. However, he also bowled a carefully disguised off cutter, and later in his career added reverse-swing to his armoury, a skill that made him a consistent wicket-taker even on bland, subcontinental pitches.

He led the Sri Lankan new-ball attack for over a decade and has taken 400 One Day International wickets, only the second Sri Lankan to do so after Muttiah Muralitharan.

Only three bowlers have taken more wickets in ODI cricket history.

Vaas holds the record for the best bowling performance in One-Day International cricket with his 8 for 19 off eight overs against Zimbabwe at the Sinhalese Sports Club Ground in December 2001. It remains the only eight-wicket haul in ODI cricket history.

Vaas has taken two ODI hat-tricks in his career, the third of only four players to have achieved the feat. 

 

Career Statistics

Full names: Chaminda Vaas

Born: January 27, 1974 (46), Mattumagala

Major teams: Sri Lanka, Asia XI, Basnahira North, Colts Cricket Club, Deccan Chargers, Hampshire, Marylebone Cricket Club, Middlesex, Northamptonshire, Worcestershire

Playing role: Bowler

Bowling style: Left-arm fast-medium

 

ODI Career: Sri Lanka (1994-2008)

Mat        Inns        Balls       Runs      Wkts      BBI         BBM      Ave        Econ      SR       4w          5w       10w

322         320         15775     11014      400        8/19       8/19       27.53     4.18       39.4       9             4          0

 

Career highlights

  • Holds the record for taking the only 8-fer in ODIs
  • 1st player to take a hat-trick off the first 3 balls of an innings
  • Youngest bowler to take 300 wickets in ODI cricket
  • Only 3 bowlers have taken more ODI wickets
  • Named in the World ODI XI by the ICC in 2004 and 2007

A master of reverse swing, Waqar Younis bucked the 1980s trend of bowling fast and pitching short by bowling fast and pitching full.

Not an obvious recipe for success until you factor in prodigious late inswing, which was designed to smash into the base of leg stump or the batsman's toes. In his youth, he was one of the fastest ever.

His method of aiming for the stumps rather than the batsman earned him the best strike rate of any bowler with over 200 Test wickets until Dale Steyn came along.

Waqar made his International cricket debut for Pakistan against India in November 1989 and made an immediate impression with his speed. Soon, he became known as "Wiki" or the "Burewala Express".

During his career, marred by persistent back injuries, Waqar took 416 One Day International wickets and with Wasim Akram, formed one of the world's most feared bowling attacks.

He is the youngest bowler to take 400 wickets in ODI cricket.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Waqar Younis

Born: November 16, 1971 (48), Vehari, Punjab

Major teams: Pakistan, Glamorgan, Karachi, Lahore, Multan, National Bank of Pakistan, Rawalpindi, Redco Pakistan Ltd, Surrey, United Bank Limited

Playing role: Bowler

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1989-2003)

Mat        Inns        Balls       Runs      Wkts      BBI         BBM       Ave        Econ       SR        4w          5w            10w

262          258        12698      9919       416        7/36       7/36       23.84       4.68       30.5       14           13               0

 

Career highlights

  • Claimed 416 wickets at an average of 23.84
  • Youngest bowler to take 400 wickets in ODI cricket
  • Only bowler to have taken 5 wickets in an innings in 3 consecutive ODIs
  • First captain to take a 7-wicket haul in an ODI innings
  • Most 5-wicket hauls in ODIs (13)
  • Most 4-wicket hauls in ODIs (27)

Wasim Akram was perhaps the best left-arm fast bowler in history. With complete mastery over swing and seam, he could sometimes with a single delivery, move the ball both ways.

Wasim started his ODI career against New Zealand in Pakistan in 1984 under the captaincy of Zaheer Abbas and quickly rose to prominence by taking five wickets in his third ODI against Australia in the 1985 Benson & Hedges World Championship.

Among those five wickets were Kepler Wessels, Dean Jones, and Captain Allan Border.

Wasim took his 100th wicket, that of Curtly Ambrose, in Sharjah during the 1989–1990 Champions Trophy against West Indies. Overall, he took five wickets in that match, including a hat trick in which all three batsman were bowled.

He took his second hat trick on May 4, 1990 in Sharjah, against Australia. Once again, all three batsmen were out bowled.

From 1986–1989, Wasim took 100 wickets at 22.71 runs per wicket and at an economy rate of less than 3.9 runs per over.

He was the first bowler to reach the 500-wicket mark in ODI cricket during the 2003 World Cup.

 

Career Statistics

Full Name: Wasim Akram

Born: June 3, 1966 (54), Lahore, Punjab

Major teams: Pakistan, Hampshire, Lahore, Lancashire, Pakistan Automobiles Corporation, Pakistan International Airlines

Playing role: Bowler

Bowling style: Left-arm fast

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1984-2003)

Mat        Inns        Balls       Runs      Wkts        BBI         BBM        Ave        Econ       SR           4w          5w               10w

356         351         18186      11812      502        5/15         5/15       23.52       3.89       36.2          17             6                  0

 

Career highlights

  • 1st man to take 500 ODI wickets
  • Claimed 502 wickets at an average of 23.52
  • He has two hat-tricks in ODIs
  • Ranked by Wisden as the best ODI bowler of all time in 2002
  • Most ODI wickets as captain (158)

Grant Flower expects Pakistan run machine Babar Azam to "break a lot of records" but fears there is a danger he could regret taking over as captain.

Babar is the top-ranked Twenty20 international batsman in the world and has established himself as one of the best players on the planet in all formats.

The 25-year-old was named T20I skipper last October and also took the ODI captaincy this month.

Flower recognised the elegant right-hander was a special talent when he first started working with him as Pakistan batting coach and believes he is destined for greatness.

He told Stats Perform News: "Babar is brilliant.

"The first time I saw him play and first time I worked with him - when I threw balls at him at the academy in Lahore - he picked up length so much quicker than the rest of the players and I think that's the hallmark of a great batsman.

"If you look at some of the best players in the world like Steve Smith, Virat Kohli et cetera, they pick up length really quickly and play the ball late, have a great eye and hand-eye coordination. He has that and I think he is going to break a lot of records.

"Even in T20 cricket he plays normal cricket shots and that is also the sign of a great player. As long as he stays humble, which I'm sure he will as he's a good bloke, there is no reason why he can't be one of the best and he already pretty much is."

Sri Lanka batting coach Flower hopes Babar thrives as a leader but fears his form could suffer due to the extra pressure on his shoulders.

The former Zimbabwe all-rounder said: "He's got a good cricketing brain but there's a lot of politics in Pakistan cricket and a lot of pressure from the public.

"If you start losing, it's one thing being the best batsman but that will put pressure on your batting skills and it can all come tumbling down pretty quickly.

"We've seen with great players in the past the pressures that captaincy can bring, but some players get better and if he gets better then the world is his oyster. Time will tell.

"But he seems pretty positive about it, I read what he said in an interview when he got the captaincy. I wish him all the best and hopefully all positives come with that."

 

- Grant Flower was speaking on behalf of The Conservation Games, a first-of-its-kind initiative from the Zambesia Conservation Alliance. To watch Grant in action, visit and subscribe to the Conservation Games channel on YouTube.

England have named 14 uncapped players among a 55-man squad to join up for England group training. 

Will Jacks, Dan Lawrence, Tom Kohler-Cadmore and Henry Brookes are among those selected yet to feature at international level, but there is no place for experienced duo Alex Hales or Liam Plunkett. 

David Willey, Ben Duckett and Dawid Malan, however, will be hoping to make a return for England after they were asked to report for sessions that will go ahead subject to government approval. 

Bowlers were able to begin individual training last week for the first time since they were forced into lockdown due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 

There has been no confirmation of when England will play next, but a large training group was announced on Friday ahead of a proposed Test series with West Indies on home soil, as well as one-day games against Ireland.

England and Wales Cricket Board performance director Mo Bobat said: "It's really pleasing to be in a position to have players returning to training and a huge amount of work has been done by many to get us this far. 

"The pool of players will give selectors strong options when it comes to selecting squads across formats further down the line, as we move closer to our aim of playing international cricket this summer. 

"We will need to continue to work closely with our medical team and government to ensure that our return to training and play activities are in line with best-practice guidelines. 

"We're also really grateful for the positive and collaborative response from our county colleagues who are doing a great job at facilitating coaching and support for the players. The fact that we can call on our network to support the national effort shows the strength of our system." 

 

England training group: Moeen Ali, James Anderson, Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow, Tom Banton, Dom Bess, Sam Billings, James Bracey, Stuart Broad, Henry Brookes, Pat Brown, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Brydon Carse, Mason Crane, Zak Crawley, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Liam Dawson, Joe Denly, Ben Duckett, Laurie Evans, Ben Foakes, Richard Gleeson, Lewis Gregory, Sam Hain, Tom Helm, Will Jacks, Keaton Jennings, Chris Jordan, Tom Kohler-Cadmore, Dan Lawrence, Jack Leach, Liam Livingstone, Saqib Mahmood, Dawid Malan, Eoin Morgan, Craig Overton, Jamie Overton, Matt Parkinson, Ollie Pope, Adil Rashid, Ollie Robinson, Joe Root, Jason Roy, Phil Salt, Dom Sibley, Ben Stokes, Olly Stone, Reece Topley, James Vince, Amar Virdi, David Willey, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

Cricket Australia (CA) is braced for a huge financial hit due to the possible postponement of the ICC Twenty20 World Cup, as well as playing home games without spectators. 

Speaking to the media on Friday, CA chief executive Kevin Roberts predicted the governing body stands to miss out on 80million Australian dollars due to the potential changes caused by the coronavirus pandemic. 

Admitting there is a “very high risk” of the global T20 tournament being pushed back from the original plan of October and November this year, Roberts outlined the expected missed income due to such a delay. 

However, the bigger blow is a home summer without any fans present at international fixtures, while there is also the extra cost of the biosecurity measures required to host opposing teams. 

"The likelihood of significant crowds is very slim - ordinarily that would deliver well over $50m revenue to CA," Roberts told reporters. 

"The T20 World Cup is a big question and that's a factor of perhaps $20m. We have been hopeful all along that it could be staged in October-November, but you would have to say there's a very high risk about the prospect of that happening. 

"And it's likely that our biosecurity measures that we need to put in place to deliver the season will cost in the order of $10m." 

Australia are due to host Zimbabwe in one-day internationals in August, then West Indies arrive for T20 games in October. As for Tests, Afghanistan are due to play one in Perth in November, followed by a four-match series against India, who complete their tour with three ODIs in January. 

New Zealand are the final visitors of a packed schedule, making the short trip for three one-dayers and a one-off T20 early next year. 

On the recently released schedule, Roberts remained cautiously optimistic, adding: “We're very optimistic that we will be able to stage the India men's tour and the other inbound tours for the season. 

"But we're realistic enough to know they will look very different to a normal summer. We have been forced to effectively plan for the worst and hope for the best." 

Adam Gilchrist made his international debut in ODIs as a wicketkeeper against South Africa in 1996. He started his career in a similar manner to Tendulkar, coming lower down the order. He made some useful contributions there, however in the day and age of pinch-hitters – or batsmen who could take advantage of the fielding restrictions – he was sent to open the innings. That changed everything. He went on to score his maiden century in his very second match at the top of the order against South Africa in Sydney.

Glenn McGrath, Brett Lee could have been a nightmare for other wicketkeepers but Gilly was safe as houses behind the wickets. Then there was arguably the greatest leg spinner the world has ever seen, Shane Warne. Gilly was equally safe while wicketkeeping for the great spinner as well. He hardly dropped catches and helped Australia win by turning those half chances into wickets.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Adam Craig Gilchrist

Born: November 14, 1971, Bellingen, New South Wales

Major teams: Australia, Deccan Chargers, ICC World XI, Kings XI Punjab, Middlesex, New South Wales, Western Australia

Playing role: Wicketkeeper-batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

Height: 1.86 m

 

ODI Career: Australia (1996–2008)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave     BF        SR       100s    50s    4s      6s      Ct      St

287     279      11     9619     172    35.89   9922    96.94      16     55      1162   149    417     55

 

Career Highlights

  • Holds record for most catches by a wicketkeeper in an ODI innings (6)
  • Second when paired with Glenn McGrath for most successful bowler/wicketkeeper combinations with 72 dismissals.
  • First and fourth on list with most dismissals in a calendar year 56 catches and 9 stumpings in 1999 and 53 catches and 3 stumpings in 2003.
  • Named in Australia's "greatest ever ODI team”
  • One of three players to have won three World Cup titles
  • Second most centuries by an ODI wicketkeeper (16)
  • Record for scoring at least 50 runs in successive CWC finals (1999, 2003, 2007)
  • Fastest century in a World Cup final
  • Highest ever score in a World Cup final (149) Barbados, 2007

Boucher was a genius behind the stumps that kept wickets to the likes of Allan Donald, Shaun Pollock, Dale Steyn in their absolute prime.

As a lower middle-order batsman, he was symbolic of how traditionally deep South Africa have always batted. While not a holder of startling averages, he has produced plenty of well-played cameos. His career highlight came in 2006 when playing Australia; Boucher scored the winning runs in what is regarded as the greatest ODI ever played, when his team successfully chased the then-record ODI score of 434, quickly refreshing record-books.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Mark Verdon Boucher

Born: December 3, 1976, East London, Cape Province

Major teams: South Africa, Africa XI, Border, Cape Cobras, ICC World XI, Kolkata Knight Riders, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Warriors

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: South Africa (1998-2011)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS     Ave     BF       SR        100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct     St

295      221     57      4686      147*  28.57   5528   84.76         1      26      356     83     403    22

 

Career Highlights

  • Most catches taken by a wicketkeeper in all forms of international cricket (952)
  • First place when paired with Makhaya Ntini for most successful bowler/wicketkeeper combinations with 75 dismissals.
  • Most dismissals in international cricket (998)
  • 4th most dismissals in ODIs (424)
  • 2nd fastest ODI century by a South African (44 balls)
  • 4th fastest half-century in World Cup history (21 balls)
  • 5th fastest half-century in World Cup history (22 balls)

Sangakkara was a natural behind the stumps, and for someone who was naturally a left-hander, took fine catches to his right off both fast bowlers and spinners. He could keep to Chaminda Vaas’ pace on bouncy tracks in overseas conditions as well as to Muttiah Muralitharan on spinning tracks in Sri Lanka.

He took 539 catches and also stumped 139 times in his international career. His combined 678 dismissals is the fourth most in international cricket. As far as his batting his concerned his 14234 runs in ODI cricket speaks volumes about his contribution.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Kumar Chokshanada Sangakkara

Born: October 27, 1977, Matale

Major teams: Sri Lanka, Asia XI, Central Province, Colombo District Cricket Association, Deccan Chargers, Durham, Hobart Hurricanes, ICC World XI, Jamaica Tallawahs, Kandurata, Kandurata Maroons, Kings XI Punjab, Marylebone Cricket Club, Multan Sultans, Nondescripts Cricket Club, Quetta Gladiators, Sunrisers Hyderabad, Surrey, Warwickshire

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Sri Lanka (2000-2015)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave      BF        SR       100s     50s     4s       6s      Ct     St

404      380     41     14234    169    41.98   18048    78.86     25        93      1385    88     402    99

 

Career Highlights

  • Had a hand in 54 wickets across 36 innings behind the stumps at the World Cup, at an average of 1.5 dismissals per innings.
  • Most runs as wicketkeeper-batsman in ODI history (13,262 runs)
  • Second most stumpings in a career as a wicketkeeper in ODIs – 99
  • 1st wicketkeeper-batsman to score over 10000 runs in ODIs
  • Most wicket-keeping dismissals in ODI cricket (482)
  • ICC ODI Cricketer of the Year (2011 & 2013)
  • At retirement, he was the 2nd highest run-scorer in ODI cricket
  • 1st player to have scored 4 centuries in a single World Cup
  • Most consecutive centuries in a single World Cup (4)

Mahendra Singh Dhoni is credited with having the fastest hands behind the stumps and that suits him perfectly since he plays the game ahead of what is happening.

His overall game awareness and the ability to stay, always, one step ahead of the batsman puts him among the very best to occupy the position.

He is hardly your typical wicketkeeper and there is often a good amount of craft in his game. Under pressure when India needs a wicket, he has been known to produce moments of magic out of nowhere to send the batsman back to the pavilion. His stats for someone who does not count as a textbook wicketkeeper are staggering.

Dhoni, in 350 matches, has snaffled 321 catches along with a record 123 stumpings.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Mahendra Singh Dhoni

Born: July 7, 1981, Ranchi, Bihar (now Jharkhand)

Major teams: India, Air India Blue, Asia XI, Bihar, Bradman XI, Chennai Super Kings, East Zone, East Zone Under-19s, Help for Heroes XI, India A, Indian Board President's XI, International XI, Jharkhand, Rajasthan Cricket Association President's XI, Rest of India, Rising Pune Supergiants, Sehwag XI

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: (2004-present)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave      BF          SR      100s    50s   4s      6s      Ct     St

350     297     84     10773     183*   50.57   12303      87.56     10     73     826    229    321    123

 

Career Highlights

  • Highest batting average among wicket-keepers (50.96)
  • In 2017, became the first Indian to hit 200 sixes in ODIs
  • ICC ODI Player of the Year (2008 & 2009)
  • Highest score by a wicket-keeper, 183 against Sri Lanka in 2005
  • 1st player to pass 10,000 runs in ODIs with an average of over 50
  • Most not outs in ODIs (82)
  • Most stumpings by any wicket-keeper in an ODIs (120)

For the better part of a decade following his debut, Ian Botham was the maverick genius who stood opposite to every English stereotype.

The first years were nothing but tumultuous and scintillating. He had already set most of the famed grounds on fire with his late swing and spectacular hitting. Botham was a phenomenon.

He bowled fast-medium, often quick, swung them a long way in the days when his waistline had not spread with his age and reputation and bounced out the best of batsmen.

When the movement in the air was not what it used to be, he added to his weaponry cunning changes of pace and a wicked leg-cutter.

 

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Ian Terence Botham

Born: 24 November 1955 (age 64), Heswall, Cheshire, England

Height: 6 ft 2 in (188 cm)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

Playing role: All-rounder

 

ODI Career (batting): England (1977–1992)

Mat    Inns    NO  Runs    HS    Ave     BF       SR      100s   50s    4s      6s      

116     106     15    2113    79    23.21   2671    79.10      0       9      197    44      

 

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs          Wkts   BBI     BBM          Ave    Econ   SR          4w     5w     10w

116    115    6271 4139          145    4/31 4/31          28.54 3.96   43.2          3       0       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Remains England's leading catcher among non-wicketkeepers, with 120.
  • One of 20 bowlers who bowled at least 600 overs till the end of 1992 and conceded less than four per over.
  • Picked up 16 wickets in 10 games and was instrumental in guiding England to the 1992 World Cup final.
  • He scored 2,113 runs with a highest score of 79
  • He took 145 wickets with a best of 4 for 31
  • He collected 36 catches in ODIs
  • Took part in 2 World Cup finals for England

Grant Flower believes Sri Lanka possess the "flair" to be contenders to win a Twenty20 World Cup that he expects to be rescheduled.

Flower took the role of batting coach when Mickey Arthur was appointed Sri Lanka head coach on a two-year deal last December.

The new coaching team have not had much time to work with the players since taking over due to the coronavirus pandemic, but they are due to resume training next Monday.

Flower is optimistic the Arthur era will be a success and feels Sri Lanka can be a real threat at the next major tournament in Australia, which he believes will start later than October 18 as a result of the COVID-19 crisis.

He told Stats Perform News: "I suppose the beauty of T20 cricket is it can be quite hit and miss, so it's a lot easier to topple the big teams than it would be over, say, a five-day game.

"It is much more of a test of all of your skills put together in a five-day match, but in a T20 you can have a great game where a couple of your key players come off, you can be the best, so hopefully our skill levels can come through.

"They have always been good with the white ball, through a bit of innovation and their flair, a bit like the Pakistanis, so hopefully that continues."

The International Cricket Council on Wednesday denied reports that the World Cup has been postponed, but Flower is anticipating the showpiece will be put back.

"I'm always optimistic, but whether or not it happens or whether they decide to have an IPL before... I can see the T20 World Cup getting pushed back to maybe the end of the year. From what I've heard so far that's probably the way to go."

Former Zimbabwe all-rounder Flower wants to see senior Sri Lanka players realise their potential and reap the rewards of the faith that has been shown in them over the years.

He added: "There's a lot of enthusiasm here and the guys are skilful, it just needs a bit of structure and a lot of hard work, but I don't see any reason why we shouldn't have a good run here and get some decent results.

"A lot of the guys are at stages in their careers where a lot of investment has been put in them and they've been around for a while working with some good coaches, so hopefully that pays dividends."

 

- Grant Flower was speaking on behalf of The Conservation Games, a first-of-its-kind initiative from the Zambesia Conservation Alliance. To watch Grant in action, visit and subscribe to the Conservation Games Channel on YouTube.

Andrew Flintoff’s one-day figures were good without being outstanding but it was his presence that had the biggest impact on his teammates and crowds.

He was always a correct, powerful batsman, even though he was sometimes hesitant against quality spin.

He scored 50 on his one-day international debut against Pakistan at Sharjah in 1999. The following year, he hit 84 in just 60 balls as England began their tour of Pakistan with victory in the opening one-day international at Karachi.

With scores of 43, 59, and 123 against the West Indies, 99 against India, and 104 and 106 against New Zealand, 2004 was perhaps Flintoff’s best year playing One-Day Internationals. That year he was named the ICC ODI Player of the Year.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Andrew Flintoff

Born: December 6, 1977, Preston, Lancashire

Major teams: England, Brisbane Heat, Chennai Super Kings, ICC World XI, Lancashire

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

Height: 6 ft 4 in

 

ODI Career (Batting): England (1999-2009)

Mat        Inns        NO       Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100s        50s           4s        6s              

141         122          16       3394       123        32.01      3821       88.82            3          18           308        93                     

 

ODI Career (Bowling): England (1999-2009)

Mat        Inns        Balls       Runs      Wkts       BBI        BBM      Ave       Econ      SR        4w      5w          10w

141          119        5624       4121        169        5/19       5/19      24.38     4.39       33.2        6       2               0

 

Career Highlights

  • 3rd most wickets by an England player (168)
  • Only England player with 3000+ runs and 150+ wickets
  • Amassed 3394 runs at an average of 32.01 in ODIs
  • 1 of 4 England players to take a hat-trick in ODI cricket

Imran Khan played 175 matches and scored 3709 runs at an average of 33.41. His highest score was 102 not out. His best ODI bowling figures were 6 wickets for 14 runs, a record by any bowler in an ODI innings in a losing cause.

In their own way, these figures present a picture of just how good Imran Khan was in his playing days for Pakistan. He also made himself into an allrounder worth a place for his batting alone, and captained Pakistan as well as anyone, rounding off his career with the 1992 World Cup, the only time Pakistan ever won the title.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Imran Khan Niazi

Born: October 5, 1952, Lahore, Punjab

Major teams: Pakistan, Dawood Club, Lahore, New South Wales, Oxford University, Pakistan International Airlines, Sussex, Worcestershire

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

 

ODI Career (Batting): Pakistan (1971-1992)

Mat        Inns     NO     Runs      HS        Ave        BF         SR       100s      50s     

175        151       40      3709      102*      33.41     5105      72.65        1        19      

 

ODI Career (Bowling): Pakistan (1971-1992)

Mat     Inns      Balls      Runs     Wkts      BBI        BBM      Ave       Econ      SR         4w      5w     10w

175      153       7461      4844      182        6/14       6/14      26.61     3.89       40.9       3         1          0

 

Career Highlights

  • Current Prime Minister of Pakistan
  • Captained Pakistan to the 1992 World Cup title
  • Tallied 3709 runs at an average of 33.41

Shakib al Hasan’s contributions to Bangladesh's ODI team have been vital with bat and ball. He became the first player from Bangladesh to achieve the double of 2000 runs and 100 wickets. He also became the first batsman from Bangladesh to score five hundreds, despite mostly batting at No. 5.

The best player in the team, it wasn't surprising when Shakib was handed the captaincy in 2009. His ability to perform consistently and to stay calm under pressure worked well for Bangladesh, as they won 22 out of 47 games under him, and even beat England in the 2011 World Cup.

In 2015, Shakib became the first and only cricketer in history to be ranked the 'No.1 all-rounder' by ICC in its Player Rankings in all three formats of the game.

In June 2019, Shakib became the fastest player to score 6,000 runs and take 250 wickets in ODIs in just 199 matches.

He is the highest run-scorer as well as the highest wicket-taker for Bangladesh in ICC ODI World Cups. He is also the only cricketer to score 1000 runs and to take 30 wickets in the World Cup.

At the 2019 Cricket World Cup, Shakib became the first cricketer to score 600 runs and take 10 wickets in a single World Cup.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Shakib Al Hasan

Born: March 24, 1987, Magura, Jessore

Major teams: Bangladesh, Adelaide Strikers, Bangladesh A, Bangladesh Cricket Board XI, Barbados Tridents, Brampton Wolves, Dhaka Gladiators, Jamaica Tallawahs, Karachi Kings, Khulna Division, Kolkata Knight Riders, Peshawar Zalmi, Sunrisers Hyderabad, Worcestershire

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Slow left-arm orthodox

 

ODI Career (Batting): Bangladesh (2006- present)

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100s        50s           4s           6s             

206          194        27          6323      134*        37.86     7641      82.75             9           47           574           42                

 

ODI Career (Bowling): Bangladesh (2006- present)

Mat        Inns        Balls       Runs      Wkts      BBI         BBM      Ave        Econ      SR           4w          5w               10w

206        203        10517    7857      260        5/29       5/29       30.21     4.48       40.4       8             2               0

 

Career Highlights

  • Fastest player to score 6,000 runs and take 250 wickets in ODIs
  • Most runs and most wickets for Bangladesh in World Cups
  • Only cricketer to score 1000 runs and take 30 wickets in the World Cup
  • 1st cricketer to score 600 runs and take 10 wickets in a single World Cup
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