Brad Haddin’s arrival to Test cricket was delayed until he was 30 years old because of a man called Adam Gilchrist, who was unmovable in the Australian Test side. However, once he did, he proved to be a brilliant replacement with the gloves. Uncompromising as is the expectation for a wicketkeeper, Haddin was also brilliant at diving around and picking up wickets, maybe other wicketkeepers would not have been able to get to. His acrobatics meant he would end up with 270 dismissals in just 66 Tests, a phenomenal average, even of his career started late. As a wicketkeeper-batsman, he failed to live up to the heady heights of Gilchrist but still had a healthy average of 32.98 which was got to, in part, with his four centuries and 18 half-centuries.

Career Statistics

Full name: Bradley James Haddin

Born: October 23, 1977, Cowra, New South Wales

Major teams: Australia, Australian Capital Territory, Islamabad United, Kolkata Knight Riders, New South Wales, Sydney Sixers

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

Height: 1.80 m

 

Test Career: Australia (2008-2015)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave      BF      SR        100s    50s     Ct          St

66        112    13      3266    169    32.98    5587   58.45       4       18       262          8

 

Career Highlights

  • 6th most dismissals in Tests (270)
  • Scored 4 centuries 18 half-centuries
  • Averaged 32.99 with the bat
  • Tallied 3266 runs as a wicket-keeper

South African batsman Abraham Benjamin de Villiers was just an excellent athlete. As a fielder he was superb and when he took the gloves there was no difference between himself and a wicketkeeper who had spent all their career behind the stumps. AB de Villiers is undoubtedly one of South Africa’s greatest cricketers. Batting from anywhere from one to eight in the South Africa line-up, his versatility as a batsman is world-renowned. Over the course of 114 Tests, de Villiers would end up with an average of 50.66, 8,765 runs, 22 hundreds and 46 half-centuries, a career with the bat that anybody could be proud of.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Abraham Benjamin de Villiers

Born: February 17, 1984, Pretoria

Major teams: South Africa, Africa XI, Barbados Tridents, Botha XI, Brisbane Heat, Delhi Daredevils, Jacques Kallis Invitational XI, Lahore Qalandars, Middlesex, North Eastern Transvaal, Northerns, Pretoria University, Proteas, Rangpur Riders, Rest of South Africa, Royal Challengers Bangalore, South Africa A, South Africa Under-19s, Titans, Tshwane Spartans

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

Test Career:   South Africa (2004-2018)

 Mat   Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave     BF          SR      100s    50s    Ct      St

114    191      18      8765      278*   50.66   16077    54.51     22       46    222      5

 

Career Highlights

  • Played 24 Tests as a wicket-keeper/batsman
  • Highest batting average for a wicket-keeper (57.42)
  • 7 of his 22 hundreds came as a wicket-keeper
  • 7 of his 46 fifties came as a wicket-keeper

A quick look at the stats of legendary South African all-rounder suggests that he should not just routinely be part of conversations that speak about the best all-rounder of all-time but perhaps the best of all-time.

Instead, it seems the South African has been found short of ground in another routine legend ranking discussion, finishing behind the incomparable Garfield Sobers and it seems struggling to finish ahead of Imran Khan, in the latest Ultimate XI Test cricket all-rounder choice.

Let’s get this straight, if Kallis is to come up short it will certainly never be on the weight of his statistics.

The batsman’s Test record compares favourably with almost any other batsman of modern times.  In terms of run scored, his total of 13,289 is third on the all-time list, bettered by only Ricky Ponting (13,378) and Sachin Tendulkar (15,921). 

In fact, Kallis has scored some 1,336 more runs than Brian Lara, a man who is generally considered as one of the four best batsmen of all time, and in some instances, the best. In terms of averages, he has a higher average than Lara, Tendulkar, Dravid, and Ponting. Compared to batsmen who have made debuts in the past 30 years, only Kumar Sangakkara, Steve Smith, and Adam Voges (who only played 20 Tests) can top Kallis’ career average of 55.37.

His 45 Test centuries is second on the all-time list behind Tendulkar’s 51 and four ahead of Ponting and lest we forget he was just short of 300 Test wickets with 292 at 32.65.

But, despite constantly etching his name above the greats some have found it easy to dismiss Kallis's case because he lacked one factor many of his contemporaries possess. He was unspectacular.

The South African simply got the job done with very little fanfare. Best summed up in his own words; “I think it was my personality. I never really enjoyed the limelight, I liked going about my business and just getting on with the job. I never played the game for accolades or anything like that.”

For some, that has been enough to relegate one of the greatest players of a generation to a mere consideration, or well below what his achievements merit in the debate on greatness, but it shouldn’t be.

The West Indies tour of England this summer is becoming increasingly likely following positive discussions between the medical team and staff of the English Cricket Board and the CWI on Monday.

Both boards have been in discussions since the start of the month intent on charting a pathway to the West Indies travelling to England for three Tests in July.

Initially scheduled for June, the tour was been postponed because of fears over player safety caused by the spread of the Coronavirus COVID-19.

However, late last week, CWI notified 30 players that they should be prepared to travel and play in England in July if it is decided that the tour would go ahead. It was also revealed that further discussions were set to take place on Monday.

CWI CEO Johnny Grave confirmed to Sportsmax.TV Tuesday that those Monday talks went well.

“The ECB is confident that they can deliver a safe plan for bio-secure behind closed doors cricket that will meet the UK Government guidelines and will therefore likely secure their board's approval,” Grave told Sportsmax.TV today.

“We will have further meetings and discussions this week with the ECB as we try and plan for the Test Tour taking place this summer in an environment where the number-one priority is the health and safety of all players and staff."

During an interview on Sportsnation Live on Nationwide Radio in Jamaica on Saturday, Grave reiterated that safety was the primary concern of the CWI.

“We would have to be absolutely certain that our players and support staff would be in a safe environment in order for us to play cricket,” he said while explaining the conditions under which the team would travel and play in the UK.

“What it means at this stage is that we would use charter flights to first collect players in the Caribbean and then to make our way across the Atlantic. We wouldn’t be on aircraft with any other passengers. There would be private charters for our players and team.

“Then once we land in the UK we would undergo a two-week quarantine period, which would be at a cricket facility, so the players would have the opportunity to play and train. They would be the only ones in that secure environment.”

Grave said the hotel staff, ground staff and other personnel would be tested regularly and would have to remain on-site for the duration. “Once they enter that bio-secure environment no one would be allowed to come or go, so they’d be in lockdown within a cricket venue with a hotel on-site,” he said.

According to Grave, the CWI medical and support staff have determined that the Windies would need at least four weeks to get the players into the condition that they need to be to face England in the Test matches.

 

West Indies spinner Rahkeem Cornwall has vowed to 'stick to what he knows', despite being the subject of recent criticism from legendary spinner Lance Gibbs.

The 85-year-old Gibbs, undisputedly one of the region’s finest ever craftsmen in the disciple of spin bowling, was critical of the performance of the current crop of regional spinners on a whole.  His issue with Cornwall stemmed from what he described as the spinner’s short run-up and ‘lack of rhythm’.

Cornwall, who has insisted he only just heard of the remarks has insisted he is not fazed by the criticism as it was impossible to make everyone happy.

“I am not really on social media that much to see some of those things [comments] and if one or two people don’t say something to me I may not see it but I just don’t really dig too deep into it,” Cornwall told the Good Morning Jojo Radio Show.

“I really can’t stress on that, everybody has their own opinion and if you dwell on every opinion you will find yourself get mixed up in all sorts of things so you just have to control what you can control and when the opportunity arises to go and perform you just make sure you stick to what you know and perform,” he said.

The burly spinner, who made his debut for the West Indies against India last year, was recently named as part of a CWI 29-member preparatory squad for a possible tour of England.

Cricket West Indies president Ricky Skerritt has insisted the organisation is in process of implementing several recommendations of a recently commissioned audit, which promises to deliver on previously stated targets of governance reform and financial transparency.

Recent news reports had pointed to financial irregularities discovered after an audit of the CWI balance sheets, which pointed to what was deemed to be, among other things, the improper handling of funds in a recent transfer. 

According to Skerritt, however, issues that have affected the organisation as it relates to governance structure and financial management systems were already being address in two previously commissioned reports.  The Accounting and Management Consulting firm of Pannell Kerr Foster (PKF) was employed to examine the organisation’s financial practices, with a task led by Senator Don Wehby expected to review governance systems.  The CWI president pointed out that PFK had already flagged several issues and that the recommendations suggested were already being adopted by the organisation.

“In carrying out its assessments PKF uncovered some illustrations of questionable executive standards and practices. It verified and emphasized the need for drastic operational reorganization and realignment, with an urgent need for improved risk assessment and cash flow management. The PKF consultants accordingly presented their report in person to the CWI Board of Directors in December, and their twenty-eight (28) recommendations were unanimously adopted,” Skerritt stated via press release.

The recommendations were said to include; Reinforcing the President’s role as Non-Executive Chairman of the Board, with responsibility for strategic policy and governance, while empowering and supporting the CEO and his management team with full responsibility for all operational aspects of the organization; realigning the organisation’s leadership, reporting, and functional structure, to enhance accountability and reestablish clear lines of authority and responsibility; strengthening internal controls and ensuring timely reconciliation and reporting of all accounts; and modifying fundamental management practices to ensure transparency, and best practices.  It also called for discontinuing the operations of the Executive Committee of The Board and reporting to the Board on a timely basis, the accurate financial situation.

Skerritt has insisted the organisation did not consider the report for general release because it was an internal matter.  The CWI will now decide whether to release it in full.  According to the president, the recommendations from the Wehby report will be known in a few weeks.

Every now and then I need a good laugh. You know the hearty ones that make it difficult to speak or even breathe? Cringey American Idol auditions do that for me. They’re my guilty pleasure. While I watch contestants confidently sing off-key, I consider many things. Things like, did the contestants consult friends before auditioning? If they did, it’s likely that their friends weren’t being honest.

As of late, it seems like lovers of sports are longing for a chance to laugh too. They miss the excitement of live games; the highs, the lows and the unforeseen. To compensate, some are forced to watch reruns while others recollect fond memories of sports on social media. Almost immediately, I started scrolling through their virtual memory lane. I didn’t have to scroll far before I saw someone confess to missing, “NBA players missing a free throw and then high-fiving all their teammates.”

After reading it again and again, I could see how similar it was to my guilty pleasure. If he’s no good at free throws why high-five him?

I wanted to see it in action for myself. My search revealed numerous videos of Andre Drummond. Drummond is an American basketball player who was drafted by the Detroit Pistons in 2012. One specific video showed him missing several free throws at games in the 2017/18 NBA season. Nevertheless, his teammates kept high-fiving him. Here’s why I think high-fiving players who miss free throws doesn't work.

First of all, viewers are going to wonder what the hell is wrong with a team that doesn't mind losing. They may get the impression that you don’t know what a high-five is. A high five is a mini celebration. It’s done when someone accomplishes something. Missing a free throw is not an accomplishment. It’s time for improvement and the player missing the free throws deserves to know that.

Sometimes, players get not one, but two or even three chances at a free-throw. When they miss the first one, they go in for a high-five. But then they miss a second and go in for another high five. Somebody is getting duped. Either the teammates or the person missing the free throws isn’t seeing the plot. Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice …

Naturally, teammates want to encourage each other on the court, I get that. But here’s the thing about hope. Hope is a future concept. It cannot be true, it can only become true. Neither can hope be false, it can only turn out to be false. A high-five, in this case, is a gesture of hope. Teammates hope that the player will make the next free throw. Still, there’s a probability that what is being hoped for (successful free throws) will not happen. It leaves too much room for disappointment.

I think high-fives are also a way of sparing the free thrower's feelings. We are all guilty of it. We’re afraid of hurting other people's feelings. Take, for instance, a couple going out on a date. The woman gets dolled up, she feels iffy about her outfit. She proceeds to ask her partner for their opinion. “Does this dress make me look fat?” Her partner responds and says the dress suits her well. During the date, the woman’s dress rips because the fabric was under too much pressure. Chances are the woman will doubt her partner’s opinion the next time around, if she even asks for their opinion again. Similarly, sparing the feelings of the player can backfire and affect relationships within the team.

High-fiving players who miss free throws can give the impression that they’re doing their best.  For me, you have to be aware of your faults and flaws to improve them. When you believe that you’re doing okay, you will disregard opportunities for improvement. Being stagnant can leave you with humiliating results.

Let me skip over to cricket for an example of this. Courtney Walsh, one of the greatest pace bowlers of all time used to get cheered for surviving a ball when he bat. Or for leaving the ball alone, can you believe it, leaving the ball alone. The result, Walsh never learned to bat. Never tried very hard at it and today holds the record for the most ducks in the history of Test cricket. Imagine that!.

Drummond improved his free throws drastically but some may not be as fortunate as him.

NBA players missing free throws and then high-fiving all their teammates is a no-no for me. I am not a fan.

Please share your thoughts on Twitter (@SportsMax_Carib) or in the comments section on Facebook (@SportsMax). Don’t forget to use #IAmNotAFan. Until next time!

Grenada wicketkeeper Junior Murray was always going to have a tough time in the West Indies lineup.

This wasn’t because Murray wasn’t a talented player, but rather what he came to the lineup to do.

Peter Jeffrey Dujon had left the West Indies after 10 years wicketkeeping to the quickest and most fearsome bowlers the region and maybe the world had ever produced.

The svelt, stylish wicketkeeper was replaced by the diminutive David Williams of Trinidad and Tobago, but that relationship had only lasted 11 Test matches.

Williams size meant he wasn’t able to make the tremendous leaps it took to grab a hold of some of the edges from batsmen or even the odd errant delivery from some of West Indies’ quicks.

His stint with the gloves for the West Indies soon came to an end and it was the hope that Murray, who came into the side, would now be an adequate replacement for Dujon.

And maybe it wasn’t fair to place the big shadow that the skinny Dujon cast on Murray, and while he never quite replaced Dujon, he didn’t wilt under the pressure either.

Murray wasn’t a natural wicketkeeper and had started out as a batsman for the Windward Islands. Even after taking the gloves, he never looked the part. Some thought he was too tall, and others thought his hands weren’t soft enough to be a good gloveman. Still, others questioned his ability to bat at the highest level despite his background as a batsman.

Well, in the first innings of the second Test on a tour of New Zealand, Murray came to the party.

Choosing to bat, a careful Stewart Williams and Sherwin Campbell made their way to 85 before the former went for an unusually slow 26.

Brian Lara, batting at his preferred number three in the lineup at the time, joined Campbell and the two, led by the Trinidad and Tobago batsman, put on 49 before the latter went for a well-played 88.

Lara (147) would go on to share a partnership of 221 with Jimmy Adams (151). Keith Arthurton, batting at an increasingly familiar five in the West Indies lineup also got in on the run-scoring game, scoring a patient 70 in a partnership of 94 with Adams then one worth 72 with Shivnarine Chanderpaul, who would end up unbeaten on 61 when the West Indies declared the innings.

That declaration, 660-5, came earlier than expected, as everybody, except for Lara had to score quite slowly based on the nature of the pitch.

Lara though scored his 147 from just 181 deliveries, slamming 24 fours with a strike rate over more than 80.

Only Murray would do better. Thinking team first, the wicketkeeper threw caution to the wind, slamming 11 fours and two sixes, as well as some really aggressive running between the wickets with Chanderpaul.

So dominant was the wicketkeeper-batsman that he scored 101 from the 139-run partnership he shared with Chanderpaul, for his first and only Test century.

Murray showed he could bat. He did have the dangerous Danny Morrison to contend with, showing he had no problem dealing with pace.

This story could have easily been about Courtney Walsh though, as the eventual man-of-the-match bagged 7-37 in New Zealand’s first innings before returning to 6-18 in the second and a match haul of 13-55.

But Walsh had many an occasion in the sun for the West Indies and I wanted to point tp the exploits of a player from the Windward Islands, a region often overlooked unless it was to find a bowler.

Murray’s century, coming from just 88 deliveries gave the West Indies three days to get the New Zealand side out twice.

They did, Walsh’s heroics skittling them out for 216 and 122, ending the game inside four days. The West Indies would win the two-match series 1-0.

The century meant more than you would at first believe though. It meant Murray became only the second player from the Windward Islands to score a century for the West Indies after Irvine Shillingford did so in 1976 against Pakistan.

The ICC has recommended prohibiting using saliva to polish the ball as one of the proposed steps to ensure cricket can return safely amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus has decimated the 2020 cricket calendar, with the sport – like most around the world – on hold as countries fight against the spread of COVID-19.

The ICC's Cricket Committee convened via conference call and agreed on suggested changes to the governing body's regulations to "mitigate the risks posed by the COVID-19 virus, and protect the safety of players and match officials".

The measures will be put before the ICC Chief Executives' Committee next month for approval.

An ICC statement read: "The ICC Cricket Committee heard from the Chair of the ICC Medical Advisory Committee Dr Peter Harcourt regarding the elevated risk of the transmission of the virus through saliva, and unanimously agreed to recommend that the use of saliva to polish the ball be prohibited.

"The Committee also noted the medical advice that it is highly unlikely that the virus can be transmitted through sweat and saw no need to prohibit the use of sweat to polish the ball whilst recommending that enhanced hygiene measures are implemented on and around the playing field."

In addition to banning the use of saliva on the ball, the ICC also put forward alterations to be made regarding the appointment of match officials.

The ICC appoints non-neutral match referees for Tests, ODIs and Twenty20 internationals. The organisation is also responsible for selecting the first field umpire for Tests and ODIs, though the host country can select their own for T20Is.

However, in the short term, the ICC is recommending against non-neutral match officials.

The statement continued: "Given the challenges of international travel with borders being closed, limited commercial flights and mandatory quarantine periods, the Committee recommended that local match officials be appointed in the short-term.

"The appointments will continue to be made via the ICC from local Elite and International Panel referees and umpires. Where there are no Elite Panel match officials in the country, the best local International Panel match officials will be appointed.

"The Committee also recommended that the use of technology is increased to support the appointments of a wider pool of umpires from around the world and has proposed an additional DRS review per team per innings is introduced in each format as an interim measure."

Cricket Committee chair Anil Kumble said: "We are living through extraordinary times and the recommendations the Committee have made today are interim measures to enable us to safely resume cricket in a way that preserves the essence of our game whilst protecting everyone involved."

Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) are awaiting confirmation that India and Bangladesh will agree to tour for limited-overs series' in July.

SLC invited India to fly out for three ODIs and as many Twenty20 Internationals, while the Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB) are also considering the opportunity to tour for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic brought the vast majority of sport to a halt.

Ashley de Silva, the SLC chief executive, revealed there has been no official word from the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) or the BCB over whether they will take up the offers.

"We have made inquiries from both the India and Bangladesh boards and are awaiting a response from them," he told ESPNcricinfo.

"As of now, those series haven't been postponed."

The BCCI on Sunday stated that contracted players would not be rushed back into training camps after the government gave the go-ahead for sports facilities to reopen.

A BCCI statement said: "The Board of Control for Cricket in India has taken note of the guidelines issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs on Sunday for containment of COVID-19 across the country. 

"Taking into the account the restrictions on air travel and movement of people till May 31, the BCCI will wait further before organizing a skill-based training camp for its contracted players.

"The Board reiterates that the safety and well-being of its athletes and support staff is paramount and will not rush into any decision that can hamper or jeopardize India's efforts in containing the spread of the virus."

There have been just 981 COVID-19 cases reported in Sri Lanka, nine of those people passing away.

Shane Warne is more sentimental about representing Australia than he lets on, his former team-mate Jason Gillespie said.

In the wake of a recent Amazon documentary about the Australian cricket team, Warne hit out at the "verbal diarrhoea" from some of the country’s current and former players over the significance of the Baggy Green.

Warne pointed to an example of players wearing them when they went to watch tennis at Wimbledon, labelling it "embarrassing".

He auctioned off his Baggy Green to support the bushfire relief fund earlier this year and often preferred to wear white floppy headgear when he was playing.

Gillespie believes the hat has important significance to many players and believes it still means a lot to Warne, even if he has been "dismissive".

"If that's what Shane believes then... he's probably more sentimental about it as he probably lets on," Gillespie said to Stats Perform News.

"It did mean a lot to him. I think he was making a point and I think the point he was trying to make was that is it a piece of cloth at the end of the day."

Gillespie added: "What it symbolises and what is symbolises for me is the hard work, the sacrifice.

"The sacrifice not just for myself but I think of my parents, driving me around to cricket practice every week to play games on the weekends. 

"I remember at Christmas time when Santa got me a new bat or a new ball and after opening presents I would hound my dad to go up to the nets before Christmas lunch.

"I'm thinking, 'The poor man, all he probably wanted to do was to have a Christmas drink and to settle down for an hour but he's with his 12 year-old son up at the nets on Christmas Day'. 

"The pride in yourself for the hard work you put in and the reward - ever since I was six years of age, I wanted to play for Australia, it was just my whole being, my whole dream. 

"Everything revolved around doing the best I could to play for Australia and that's what the cap symbolises. I look at that cap and I think, 'I earned that cap'. 

"I know that Shane has maybe been a little bit dismissive about it but it still means a lot to him. He thinks of all the hard work that he had to put in. 

"But everyone is allowed to feel slightly differently about it and what it means to them. It doesn't mean that Shane cared any less, it was just his way. 

"He used to wear a more floppy hat and for more practical reasons. He didn't want to get sunburn from the harsh sun. 

"It meant a lot, it still means a lot to all of us. I'm fortunate to have my Baggy Green and it's tucked away safely so it's all good."

Former England batsman Rob Key has revealed he suffered a mini stroke over the weekend.

Key, who turned 41 last Tuesday, posted a picture of himself smiling in a hospital bed on Monday 

He wrote alongside the picture on Instagram: "Long weekend. Turns out I've had a mini stroke.

"Thanks to everyone at the Kent and Canterbury Hospital especially Charlie And Dr baht. Now got to eat food with no flavour and take pills #triffic."

The former Kent captain, who now works in the media, played 15 Tests, five ODIs and one Twenty20 International.

Ricky Ponting believes it will be "difficult" for Usman Khawaja to force his way back into the Australia Test side.

Khawaja was a notable absentee when Cricket Australia announced its list of centrally contracted players last month.

The 33-year-old batsman has not played for his country since the drawn Ashes series in England last year and Marnus Labuschagne has looked very much at home at number three.

Former Australia captain Ponting thinks we may have seen the last of Khawaja in the longest format, despite the left-hander saying he believes he is among the top six batsmen in the country.

Ponting told ABC Grandstand: "I honestly think now he's going to find it difficult [to regain his place] and I feel for him.

"I love Usman Khawaja, I got really close to him over the last 10 years since he made his debut and I talk to him quite regularly.

"I've always felt he's a very good player and we probably never saw the absolute best of him at international cricket.

"We saw glimpses of it, and dribs and drabs, but not the consistently good player I thought he could have been for Australia."

Former Barbados Cricket Association member and women’s team manager Hartley Reid has claimed former West Indies Women’s team all-rounder Shaquana Quintyne is at times in ‘excruciating pain’ and barely able to walk after failing to properly recover from multiple cruciate ligament operations.

The 24-year-old bowling all-rounder has accused Cricket West Indies (CWI) of leaving her to fend for herself after getting injured during a training camp in preparation for the International Cricket Council 50-over World Cup three years ago.  Multiple operations and several failed rehabilitations later the player remains not only unable to resume her craft but on occasion has issues with mobility.

CWI CEO Johnny Grave has, however, strongly refuted claims that the organization has not been supportive of the player.

“We have provided enormous financial support and medical support for Shaquana since she got injured back in 2017…we have paid huge sums of money for her to try and get her career back and try and get back to full fitness,” Grave told the Mason and Guest Radio program.

According to Grave, the organisation’s Total and Permanent Disablement policy, which did not exist for the women’s team in 2017 was extended to Quintyne, in light of the injury.

Reid, however, also a former chairman of women’s cricket for the BCA when Quintyne was captain of the team, has also disputed the level of support provided by the CWI and does not believe it went far enough.

“When she got injured in Antigua in March 2017 she was not even taken to a doctor, a clinic, or to a hospital.  She got injured and was sent back to Barbados two days after.  When she came back to Barbados she was given instructions to see a doctor, that doctor was not even in Barbados.  So, she contacted me in all the pain and tears, and I took her to see an orthopedic surgeon,” Reid told the Mason and Guest Radio program.

Reid went on to explain that the player was unable to continue seeing that orthopedic surgeon in Barbados, after the CWI provided recommendations and means for the player to have surgery and treatment in Jamaica.  After some relief, the conditions, however, returned and Quintyne then got permission to be treated by the surgeon in Barbados.  The player again experienced some relief but after the conditions returned in 2018 was recommended for a third surgery, this time in Canada, on the advice of the Barbadian orthopedic surgeon.

“That is where Cricket West Indies assistance ended.  When she came back from Canada in March 2018, with the understanding that in three months’ time she would have returned to Canada for observation and further analysis, Cricket West Indies not agree for her to go,” Reid explained.

“So, she was in pain all of the time until she decided to go back with her own money.  In November 2018 she had another operation, all at her expense.  She was spending all of her money so she is poor now because she spent all of her money trying to get herself back in condition," he added.

“Right now, as we speak as she put it, her knee has locked up and she is in excruciating pain and she cannot walk, she is crying and immobile.”

 

Former West Indies batsman Ricardo Powell insists he could have benefited more from a better understanding of 'discipline' as a player and believes it is an issue to be addressed if the regional team is to return to a place of prominence.

Powell made a total of 116 appearances for the West Indies between 1999 and 2006 and is widely considered to be one of the cleanest hitters of the cricket ball.  Looking back at his introduction to the West Indies team as a 21-year-old in 1999, he freely admits that he had failed to grasp certain key elements needed for success during his development as a junior player.

“I remember growing up as a young player never understanding what discipline was in terms of the sport of cricket and how that was applied to cricket,” Powell told the Mason and Guest radio show.

“I always thought that this guy is indiscipline, he isn’t disciplined, not knowing that they were talking about the application to the actual game itself and not necessarily your behavior on and off the field,” he added.

In order to mitigate against such deficiencies affecting future generations of West Indies players, Powell believes the region must make a serious investment in mentorship programs.

“Mentorship should be a big thing in West Indies cricket right now because we are living in a different time and everyone wants to be successful overnight because of what T20 has brought to the game,” Powell said.

"I think a lot of mentorship needs to be taking place with workshops for younger players on and off the field.  The workshops also have to be relatable, with people like myself who have played the game and understand what it is to come from certain walks of life and make it to the top and understand what it takes to get there and how you are going to stay there.”

 

 

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