UEFA's decision to impose a two-match home stadium ban on Bulgaria for the racist behaviour of supporters during a match against England has underwhelmed anti-discrimination campaigners Football Against Racism in Europe (FARE).

England crushed Bulgaria 6-0 in Sofia on October 14, but the match was marred by the actions of a group of home fans, who targeted Tyrone Mings, Marcus Rashford and Raheem Sterling with racist abuse.

Nazi salutes in home sections of the ground were also seen and the match was twice brought to a halt by officials.

UEFA confirmed the punishment on Tuesday, with Bulgaria set to play against the Czech Republic behind closed doors in November, with the second game of the ban suspended for two years.

Many had called on UEFA to make an example of Bulgaria after the governing body's president Aleksander Ceferin vowed to "wage war on the racists", but FARE is dissatisfied with the sanction handed down.

FARE executive director Piara Powar said: "We welcome the speed of this decision, but we are disappointed that Bulgaria will not be expelled from the Euro 2020 qualifying competition given their previous record, and obvious inability to deal with the problems they face.

"We think that the evidence and circumstances of this match would have justified European football being given a stronger signal on the need to tackle racism.

"Obtaining justice for racist acts is not easy in any setting, it is clear that football is no exception.

"We will be in touch with UEFA to explore options and maintain that Bulgaria and others in the same situation fundamentally reappraise how they deal with racism."

The Football Association (FA) also addressed UEFA's ruling and reiterated a call to stamp out racism, though there was no indication as to whether it was content with the punishment.

"We sincerely hope the disgraceful scenes in Sofia are never repeated," an FA statement read.

"Our priority remains our players, support team and fans and we will do all we can to ensure they never have to endure such circumstances again.

"While we acknowledge UEFA's ruling, a huge challenge still exists around racism and discrimination in society.

"Football has its part to play, and must do so, but it is for all to recognise the seriousness of the problem.

"While those responsible for such deplorable behaviour at home or abroad need to be held to account, we should not lose sight of the importance of education programmes in finding a long-term solution.

"That has to be the way forward to help address the root cause of such disgusting behaviour. We are ready to build on our work with UEFA, Kick It Out and the FARE network in any positive way we can."

Bulgaria must play next month's home match against the Czech Republic behind closed doors as punishment for fans aiming racist abuse at England players in the recent Euro 2020 qualifier, UEFA has said.

England’s 6-0 win in Sofia on October 14 was tarnished by the behaviour of a group of home supporters, who targeted the likes of Tyrone Mings, Marcus Rashford and Raheem Sterling with racist abuse. Nazi salutes in home sections of the stadium were also witnessed.

UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin vowed European football’s governing body would "wage war on the racists", amid the outcry that followed the game.

Its decision to impose a two-game closed-doors punishment – with the second of those games suspended for two years – may not appease those who called for a robust reaction from UEFA.

The Bulgarian Football Union [BFU] must also display a ‘No To Racism' banner at the national team’s next two UEFA competition matches, and has been fined 75,000 euros for the racist behaviour and throwing of objects during the England game.

UEFA added, in a statement revealing the punishments imposed by its control, ethics and disciplinary body, that it had also imposed a fine of 10,000 euros on the BFU for disrupting England’s national anthem. The BFU was also issued with a warning over the showing of replays on a big screen.

The English Football Association [FA] was fined 5,000 euros for fans disrupting Bulgaria’s national anthem, with a separate charge regarding stewarding levels put back until a November 21 hearing.

Bulgaria sit bottom of Group A in Euro 2020 qualifying. Confirmation of the closed-doors punishment could bolster second-placed Czech Republic’s hopes of an away victory in the November 17 fixture between the teams, as the Czechs bid to secure a place in the finals.

UEFA did not immediately detail whether its ruling would mean Czech fans intending to travel to the game at the Vasil Levski national stadium would have their plans thwarted.

Bulgaria must play next month's home match against the Czech Republic behind closed doors as punishment for fans aiming racist abuse at England players in the recent Euro 2020 qualifier, UEFA has said.

Billy Vunipola struck a defiant tone ahead of England's Rugby World Cup final with South Africa, telling the Springboks to "bring it on".

His words came after Lood de Jager promised the underdogs would "fight fire with fire" in what the towering South African lock expects to be a bruising encounter in Yokohama on Saturday.

Rassie Erasmus' men produced a gritty display to edge out Wales 19-16 in their semi-final, while England claimed a far more eye-catching 19-7 defeat of reigning champions New Zealand.

But the physical battle will be intense this weekend and Vunipola insists Eddie Jones' side are ready for it.

"They have already come out and said they want to fight fire with fire. I guess we return it by saying, 'bring it on'," said the number eight.

"They are very, very big people but then again we have a few big blokes on our team."

Vunipola revealed the bold approach England took in the semi-final inspired him, with Jones' men combining free-flowing rugby with a controlled aggression that rattled the All Blacks.

"It's something that you probably can't measure, but I think the best way to explain it is that it's quite contagious," he said.

"It shows everyone it can be done, so everyone else tries to follow in the slipstreams of [Sam] Underhill, [Tom] Curry, [Maro] Itoje.

"It's very easy when you see it. A lot of people talk about it and it's easy to sit here and say we want to be brutal, but you have to back those words up."

Vunipola faces a tough fight of his own against opposite number Duane Vermeulen, having ended up on the losing side three times against him.

"He's such a big player for them," Vunipola said. "I played against him last summer and he was monumental in terms of getting them those two victories [in a series the Springboks won 2-1].

"Not just myself, but we've got to try and negate the influence of him and everyone else around him."

Rassie Erasmus accepts the criticism Rugby World Cup finalists South Africa have received for their attritional style but insists such an approach has been necessary after a fall from grace.

The Springboks set up a final showdown with England in Yokohama on Saturday courtesy of a battling 19-16 win over Wales, in which Erasmus' side were disciplined and diligent but never daring.

However, their run to the final in Japan comes after a recent history that saw South Africa slide down the world rankings and Erasmus claims his current tactics are a stop-gap while he plans for something bigger.

"If one understands where we have come from – we have been number six, seven and eight in the world – we have got certain challenges and one of them was to redeem ourselves and become a power again in world rugby and try and get to number one and two," he said.

"By doing that you have to have some building blocks in place and we have followed a certain route and play according to the stats and the way the game is being refereed currently and what gives you short-term good results on the scoreboard. 

"We certainly accept that there are some things in our game that we have to improve and we take it on the chin and we will keep on improving that. But we have put ourselves in a position to maybe win the World Cup and we are in the final.

"Yes, we accept the criticism but we are also happy we are in a position to compete in a World Cup final which is ultimately where we want to be."

Erasmus' staunch belief in his approach is reflected in his desire to pick "more or less" the same starting XV for the weekend as he named against Wales, and England can expect to face the same kicking game that ultimately got the better of Warren Gatland's men.

"Our team selection won't be far off from what we've been selecting the last couple of games," he said.

"We'll pretty much go with more or less the same team. We believe that's the way we can get the best out of our team and we believe that's the longevity of playing so many games in a six-day turnaround, rotating forwards and stuff like that. 

"It's a bit of horses for courses but we believe it's our most in-fit, form, best available, best combination team so there's a bit of both.

"You can expect very much the same from us on Saturday."

Jerome Garces will referee the Rugby World Cup final between England and South Africa on Saturday.

He will become the first Frenchman to take charge of a World Cup final, the match marking his 56th Test with the whistle.

Compatriot Romain Poite and New Zealand's Ben O'Keeffe will be his assistant referees, while Kiwi Ben Skeen will serve as TMO.

"I am honoured and delighted to be appointed to referee the Rugby World Cup 2019 final," said Garces ahead of the match in Yokohama.

"It is a dream as a referee, but this is a team sport, and as a team of four, we will be out there to do the best for the teams, the fans, the sport, but also the entire match officials team, selectors and support team, who have worked so hard over the last four years, culminating in Rugby World Cup 2019."

Garces' performance in the Springboks' 19-16 semi-final win over Wales attracted criticism from some pundits, who questioned the award of a couple of penalties in favour of Rassie Erasmus' side.

Billy Vunipola has Rugby World Cup success in his sights but the England number eight is hoping a bit of pre-match coaching from his auntie does not prove a distraction.

England meet South Africa in the final in Yokohama this weekend after producing a stunning display to beat reigning champions New Zealand 19-7.

Eddie Jones' side are favourites to prevail in a match against opponents who narrowly edged out Wales in their semi-final, favouring a kicking game that is in stark contrast to England's free-flowing style.

Vunipola has been a key part of that approach but, despite being on the brink of glory in Japan, he is still getting tips from the family who have travelled to support him and his brother, Mako.

"They can be a distraction as well," said the 26-year-old of his visiting loved ones. "You know, [getting them] tickets, trying to give you pointers on how to play rugby.

"My auntie is always great for that. But their support is very important to us. I guess that's all we need at the moment.

"My auntie is trying to tell me how to play number eight and things to my brother as well. So, as good as it is to have them, they can be a distraction."

On the serious business of wrapping up the title, Vunipola knows England must reproduce the levels they showed from the start against the previously all-conquering All Blacks. 

"We've set out wanting to be the best in the world and we've got to back up what we did last week," he said. "It can't just be a fluke.

"I think the challenge has been laid out by South Africa and you saw them taking Japan apart and Wales.

"The challenge is going to be up front and so we are going to have to be there, both mentally and physically."

Former England captain Lawrence Dallaglio believes his country will complete the most impressive Rugby World Cup win of all time if they are able to overcome South Africa in Saturday's final.

Dallaglio was one of the heroes of England's triumphant 2003 World Cup campaign and also starred as a grizzled band of forwards dragged a less-accomplished side to the final four years later, where South Africa were the victors in Paris.

But the manner in which Eddie Jones' men have dispatched opponents of New Zealand and Australia's calibre in the semi and quarter-finals leads Dallaglio to believe the class of 2019 will stand apart if they are able to complete a clean sweep of rugby's southern hemisphere giants.

"If they win the World Cup, which they've got every chance of doing, it will probably be the best World Cup win ever," he told Sky Sports.

"While they might have had it easy in the pool stages, they will have had to beat Australia, New Zealand and South Africa [to lift the trophy].

"If you can do the Tri Nations and lift the trophy at the end of it, then you deserve to be crowned world champions."

England produced what is likely to be viewed as a generation-defining performance in their semi-final, dominating from the first whistle to win 19-7 and hand the All Blacks their first World Cup defeat for 12 years.

By contrast, South Africa and Wales engaged in a battle of attrition on Sunday in Yokohama.

"The first game was amazing in the sense that you were absolutely captivated by what happened," Dallaglio said.

"The second game was a real kick-fest – 81 kicks [front hand]. It wasn't easy on the eye.

"That's the way it went, it was a bit of an arm-wrestle. South Africa came out on top as we probably thought they would if the game panned out that way."

He added: "England have got to play a really tough opponent. Naturally there's a bit of excitement, everyone's now expecting England to go in there and do what they did against the All Blacks.

"You can't expect that because it doesn't happen like that in rugby. I guess what South Africa have shown in this tournament is they're going to be a really difficult nut to crack. They've only conceded four tries – two of them in the first game against the All Blacks."

Eddie Jones knows South Africa's forward power poses a considerable threat to England in Saturday's Rugby World Cup final.

Both teams reached the showpiece in contrasting fashion last weekend – England dazzling throughout a dominant performance to unseat New Zealand, sending the reigning champions home with a 19-7 triumph.

A day later, South Africa were indebted to a perfect goalkicking performance from fly-half Handre Pollard as they edged Wales 19-16 in a gruelling encounter.

Jones noted the impact of the Springbok forwards introduced from the bench during the second half in Yokohama, hinting he would not be surprised if Rassie Erasmus opted to shuffle his starting XV.

"The only thing we are really worried about is how the Springboks turn up on Saturday," he told a news conference on Monday.

"They won a tough semi-final and when you are in the final of the World Cup you have done a lot of good things right.

"They are a massively aggressive forward pack and they played their stronger team in the second half as opposed to the first half.

"They are going to be a difficult side to beat but we will enjoy the preparations.

"We know a couple of areas where we think we can expose them and will make sure we are good in those areas."

England and South Africa have shared two wins apiece over their past four meetings and Jones is an admirer of his opposite number Erasmus.

Pollard and Faf de Klerk's kicking games were dominant features of the Springbok display against Wales but the England boss knows they can vary their approach.

"Rassie is a cunning coach and has done a great job with the Springboks," Jones said

"We are prepared for the unexpected and they can play different ways. You saw Faf de Klerk doing 15-20 box kicks. Handre Pollard is an excellent kicker of the ball and he was smooth and had a nice touch on the ball.

"They can play differently but also know they can come through the front door. Not many Springbok teams you play don't come through the front door so we will be ready at the front door and have enough cover for the back door if that happens."

Eddie Jones knows South Africa's forward power poses a considerable threat to England in Saturday's Rugby World Cup final.

Both teams reached the showpiece in contrasting fashion last weekend – England dazzling throughout a dominant performance to unseat New Zealand, sending the reigning champions home with a 19-7 triumph.

A day later, South Africa were indebted to a perfect goalkicking performance from fly-half Handre Pollard as they edged Wales 19-16 in a gruelling encounter.

Jones noted the impact of the Springbok forwards introduced from the bench during the second half in Yokohama, hinting he would not be surprised if Rassie Erasmus opted to shuffle his starting XV.

"The only thing we are really worried about is how the Springboks turn up on Saturday," he told a news conference on Monday.

"They won a tough semi-final and when you are in the final of the World Cup you have done a lot of good things right.

"They are a massively aggressive forward pack and they played their stronger team in the second half as opposed to the first half.

"They are going to be a difficult side to beat but we will enjoy the preparations.

"We know a couple of areas where we think we can expose them and will make sure we are good in those areas."

England and South Africa have shared two wins apiece over their past four meetings and Jones is an admirer of his opposite number Erasmus.

Pollard and Faf de Klerk's kicking games were dominant features of the Springbok display against Wales but the England boss knows they can vary their approach.

"Rassie is a cunning coach and has done a great job with the Springboks," Jones said

"We are prepared for the unexpected and they can play different ways. You saw Faf de Klerk doing 15-20 box kicks. Handre Pollard is an excellent kicker of the ball and he was smooth and had a nice touch on the ball.

"They can play differently but also know they can come through the front door. Not many Springbok teams you play don't come through the front door so we will be ready at the front door and have enough cover for the back door if that happens."

A smiling Eddie Jones hit back at Warren Gatland in typically mischievous fashion after the outgoing Wales coach appeared to question whether England would "turn up" in the Rugby World Cup final.

England produced a sensational performance on Saturday to dethrone two-time defending champions New Zealand, triumphing 19-7 as the likes of Maro Itoje, Sam Underhill and George Ford excelled.

Jones' side will face South Africa in a repeat of the 2007 final, the Springboks having edged out Wales 19-16 in Sunday's second last-four contest to deny Gatland a triumphant send-off.

Following Wales' loss, Gatland said: "We have seen in previous World Cups that teams sometimes play their final in semi-finals and don’t always turn up for a final. So it will be interesting to see how England are next week."

When those comments were put to Jones on Monday, the Australian broke into a grin and replied: "Well, guys, can you just send my best wishes to Warren to make sure he enjoys the third and fourth place play-off."

Jones was able to deliver positive injury updates on Jonny May and skipper Owen Farrell. May was a doubt for the semi-final against the All Blacks due to a hamstring injury and limped off early in the second half, while Farrell relinquished kicking duties to Ford after taking a knock in the opening 40.

"We had a walk through this morning and we had to tell Jonny to slow down a bit," Jones said of May. "He is probably in better condition than he was last week at this stage. Immeasurably better.

"Owen is a bit sore but he will be fine. We have got a few others carrying bumps and bruises because it was a tough game."

One England player who will not feature in Saturday's final is Willi Heinz. The scrum-half suffered a hamstring injury after coming off the bench against New Zealand and Ben Spencer has been called up in his place.

"It is tough for Willi," said Jones. "He has been a great contributor and a very well-liked member of the squad. He was in tears in the dressing room but he has collected himself and now knows he has another role to play for us and he will fulfil that role really well this week.

"Ben has been in and around the squad consistently for the last couple of years so he knows the game, he knows the players. He is a fit guy and just fits in quite readily. We always said to those guys outside the 31 that they need to be ready, and he is ready to go."

Ben Spencer will join the England squad as emergency cover for Willi Heinz ahead of the Rugby World Cup final.

World Cup finalists England announced on Sunday that Saracens scrum-half Spencer is on his way to Japan amid concerns over Heinz.

Heinz – who will undergo a scan – injured his hamstring in Saturday's memorable semi-final win over two-time defending champions New Zealand.

A three-time international, Spencer missed out on a spot in Eddie Jones' 31-man squad for the World Cup, though he did take part in one of England's training camps.

England will face either Wales or South Africa in the final in Yokohama on November 2.

Aaron Smith says New Zealand's Rugby World Cup exit to England left him "highly embarrassed" and insisted the All Blacks could not be accused of not caring.

Two-time defending champions New Zealand saw their unbeaten run at World Cups that stretched back to 2007 ended in convincing fashion by England.

Eddie Jones' ran out 19-7 winners in the semi-finals to consign the All Blacks to the bronze-medal match.

Scrum-half Smith was adamant the reverse was not for a lack of heart, though, as he compared the New Zealand dressing room to a funeral.

"I'm truly gutted and highly embarrassed," Smith said. "You've got family, friends texting you, but you know they're pretty gutted.

"If New Zealand [the country] thinks that we're not gutted, you've just got to go see that changing room. It was like a funeral.

"We are putting on brave faces so it's going to be a long summer. It's over and we trained our guts out. We trained hard for this and prepared well.

"But, in the end, sport happens and we got beat."

New Zealand winger Sevu Reece paid tribute to England, who can look forward to next Saturday's final.

"They were the better team in the end," Reece said. "They came out really strong at the start and they managed to hold onto that for the whole 80 [minutes].

"We expected them to come out with the performance they did but credit to England for a great performance."

Maro Itoje insists the England camp was calm leading into the stunning Rugby World Cup semi-final win over New Zealand - because Eddie Jones' men are always confident.

England dominated the All Blacks for an outstanding 19-7 victory on Saturday, handing the two-time defending champions their first World Cup defeat since 2007.

Itoje and his team-mates are now heading to the final, with England reaching the trophy match for the first time in 12 years.

The downing of New Zealand was widely considered an upset, yet in-form lock Itoje suggested England always fancied their chances, illustrating a self-belief that will serve them well heading into the final.

"We've always had belief within our squad," Itoje said. "We have the players, we have some brilliant characters in our squad, our coaches, they've done a phenomenal job so far.

"So belief has never been a problem for us.

"It was quite calm [before New Zealand], to be honest. I don't know how it was perceived from the outside.

"But we always believed that we are capable of something like we demonstrated on the pitch. It doesn't come as a big shock for us."

Itoje assessed the victory as "pretty cool" and is now relishing the prospect of a week-long build-up to the game of his life.

"Yeah, it's pretty cool. I'm very, very happy with the performance from the team," he said.

"There's obviously some things we could have done better, but we did a good job in staying engaged.

"We're really excited. These are the weeks that you want to be a part of as a player. And I'm very honoured and humbled to be a part of what will be a great week."

Steve Hansen accepted New Zealand were beaten by a better team in their Rugby World Cup semi-final loss to England, but the All Blacks coach reacted angrily to the attitude of his side being called into question.

Hansen was full of praise for England, who reached the final with a richly deserved 19-7 triumph in Yokohama that ended New Zealand's hopes of winning a third successive World Cup.

However, the departing All Blacks chief took exception to a follow-up question after revealing he had urged his players to "get hungry and desperate before it was too late" with New Zealand trailing 10-0 at half-time.

That comment prompted a reporter to ask skipper Kieran Read whether the team had "turned up with the right attitude".

After Read responded, a stern-faced Hansen said: "I'd just like to clear that up because I think it's quite a disrespectful question, to suggest the All Blacks turned up not being hungry. They're desperate to win the game.

"Because I've asked them at half-time to get hungrier, it doesn't mean to say they didn't turn up to be hungry. There's a big difference and if you want to spend some time outside I'll give you a rugby education on that one.

"To turn up and say an All Black team comes to a semi-final of the Rugby World Cup, with the amount of ability and history it's had behind it, to say it's not hungry, that's a pretty average question, I reckon."

Read said: "You've seen how hard we worked out there. Definitely the boys really wanted it. The detail of the match probably didn't go our way, but our work rate and how much we really wanted it was there.

"The guys absolutely turned up with as much as we could bring and we fell short. It's a hard thing to sit here and try and tell you exactly why it is, but we were short today, we're hurting because of it and we'll move on."

England's magnificent display drew plaudits from Hansen but the veteran coach also talked up his own players.

"We've got no regrets, I'm very proud of the All Blacks," Hansen added. "I think this tournament they've played particularly well and tonight we just got beaten by the better side. Sometimes you might find that sport's not fair, but tonight it was. We got beaten by the better side, so congratulations to them.

"We played as well as we possibly could, we just got beaten by a better team and we have to take that on the chin.

"If you don't achieve what you want to do, you have to put your big boy pants on and stand up and be counted. It doesn't stop you from hurting, it just means you've just got to accept what's been chucked at you. Sometimes sport does that to you.

"They're a good team, so there's no shame in getting beaten by them. There's a lot of hurt in it and that adversity will feed a lot more All Black teams in the future so we'll find one positive out of it."

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