Gael Monfils refuted a report claiming too much PlayStation was behind a hand injury after the French 10th seed progressed at the Australian Open.  

Monfils showed no sign of injury as he moved through to the fourth round at Melbourne Park thanks to Saturday's 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 6-3 victory over qualifier Ernests Gulbis.

Afterwards, Monfils was asked about his hand and fitness following a report citing video games, and the 33-year-old entertainer took aim at the media.

"You know, as I say, it's misunderstanding with people. I say this in a funny way, to be honest, but it's a disgrace, to be honest with you, because I'm fine," Monfils told reporters in a news conference.

"I'm in the second week, playing great tennis. I think it's just someone who, I don't know, try to — you know, I played ATP Cup, was fine. I practiced here for one month. I was really fine.

"I never said I was hurt. Somehow, you know, playing PlayStation, this? Come on. And it's easy, because I think I'm a good name to make up good story like that. Now you know."

Monfils will face fifth seed Dominic Thiem for a place in the Australian Open quarter-finals for the second time in his career.

Rafael Nadal is unsure whether he likes Nick Kyrgios ahead of a potential last-16 clash at the Australian Open amid the pair's tense relationship.

World number one Nadal raced through to the fourth round at Melbourne Park thanks to Saturday's ruthless 6-1 6-2 6-4 victory over fellow Spaniard Pablo Carreno Busta.

Next up for 19-time grand slam champion Nadal is either maligned Australian Kyrgios or Karen Khachanov in Melbourne.

All eyes have been on Nadal and Kyrgios since the latter described the Spanish superstar as "salty" last year, after the duo exchanged words at the 2019 Mexican Open.

That feud has been thrust into the spotlight after Kyrgios impersonated Nadal – who has called for the 24-year-old to show more respect – as he was called for a time violation during his second-round win against Gilles Simon at Melbourne Park.

Nadal was asked about Kyrgios following his match on Rod Laver Arena and the 2009 Australian Open champion's response was telling.

"I don't know. I don't know him personally, honestly, to have a clear opinion," Nadal told reporters when asked if he liked Kyrgios. "It's clear, of course, that when he does stuff that in my opinion is not good, I don't like. 

"When he plays good tennis and he shows passion for this game, he is a positive player for our tour, and I want my tour bigger, not smaller.

"So the players who make the tour bigger are important for the tour. When he's ready to play his best tennis and play with passion, is one of these guys. When he's doing the other stuff, of course I don't like."

Nadal produced a breathtaking and efficient display of tennis against Davis Cup team-mate Carreno Busta, hitting 42 winners and just seven unforced errors under the Melbourne sun.

The four-time Australian Open runner-up needed just one hour, 38 minutes to reach the last 16 of a slam for the 47th time in his career.

"It was my best match of the tournament so far, without a doubt. Big difference between today and the previous days," Nadal said. "I have been serving well, starting to create damage with the forehand. Hitting serve on one shot, I think."

World number one and top seed Rafael Nadal steamrolled fellow Spaniard Pablo Carreno Busta 6-1 6-2 6-4 to reach the Australian Open last 16.

Nadal, who is bidding to equal Roger Federer's men's record grand slam haul of 20 titles, barely raised a sweat in a dominant and brutal display in Melbourne on Saturday.

The 2009 Australian Open champion, Nadal hit 42 winners and just seven unforced errors without facing a break point in one hour, 38 minutes to earn a fourth-round meeting against either Nick Kyrgios or Karen Khachanov.

Nadal, who reached the last 16 of a slam for the 47th time in his career, stepped onto Rod Laver Arena to a thunderous roar and he dazzled the appreciative Melbourne crowd from the outset.

The four-time Australian Open runner-up drew collective gasps with some stunning shots as he raced out to a 2-0 lead under the Melbourne sun.

Carreno Busta only won three points after three games and it was the tone of the first set, which Nadal powered through in just 29 minutes - winning 100 per cent of his second serves and hitting nine winners.

Nadal's ferocious forehands and shot selection left Davis Cup team-mate Carreno Busta helpless and it continued in the second set, which was wrapped up two minutes quicker than the first.

It was another masterclass as Nadal racked up 15 winners to take a commanding two-sets-to-love lead – a position he has never lost from on 47 previous occasions at the Australian Open.

Like the opening two sets, Nadal enjoyed great success on Carreno Busta's serve and a break in the fifth game put him ahead and extended the Spanish superstar's winning streak against his countrymen to 18 matches.

 

STATISTICAL BREAKDOWN 
Rafael Nadal [1] bt Pablo Carreno Busta [27] 6-1 6-2 6-4

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS 
Nadal – 42/7
Carreno Busta – 21/16

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS 
Nadal – 9/0
Carreno Busta – 6/1

BREAK POINTS WON 
Nadal – 5/10
Carreno Busta – 0/0

FIRST SERVE PERCENTAGE 
Nadal – 63
Carreno Busta – 65

PERCENTAGE OF POINTS WON ON FIRST/SECOND SERVE 
Nadal – 87/78
Carreno Busta – 71/32

TOTAL POINTS 
Nadal – 79
Carreno Busta – 46

Coco Gauff continues to make history at the Australian Open and the American teenage sensation has the chance to break more records.

Gauff has the opportunity to become the first 15-year-old to win a grand slam title after dethroning Australian Open champion and third seed Naomi Osaka in the third round on Friday.

After announcing herself against Venus Williams at Wimbledon last year, Gauff has flourished in her main-draw debut at Melbourne Park this month.

Not overawed, Gauff became the youngest player to beat a defending champion at the Australian Open in the Open Era courtesy of her ruthless 6-3 6-4 victory over former world number one Osaka on Rod Laver Arena.

It was a performance, which lasted just over an hour, that shattered records in Melbourne, where Gauff became the youngest player to beat a defending champion at a slam since Jennifer Capriati (15 years and 163 days) at the 1991 US Open.

Gauff also eclipsed Martina Hingis – the youngest winner of a major singles title (1997 Australian Open) at 16 years and 105 days – as the youngest player to reach the last 16 at Melbourne Park since the Swiss great (15 years and 120 days) made it through to the 1996 quarter-finals.

She was the first American woman in 30 years to reach the third round in each of her first three slam main-draw appearances, a feat accomplished by neither Williams sister, and the third player in the last 30 years to earn at least eight slam match wins before her 16th birthday.

Gauff is also the youngest player to defeat a top-five ranked opponent since the 1991 match between Capriati and Gabriela Sabatini.

Roger Federer can banish the memories of last year's fourth-round Australian Open exit with victory against Marton Fucsovics on Sunday.

Federer was sent packing by Stefanos Tsitsipas in 2019 - the 20-time grand slam champion's earliest elimination from Melbourne Park since 2015.

The quarter-finals are on the horizon, though a lot will depend on how Federer recovers from his marathon third-round encounter.

We take a closer look at Federer's form ahead of his meeting with Fucsovics.

Form and results

It was all routine for Federer until Friday's marathon five-setter against local favourite John Millman, who stunned the Swiss maestro at the 2018 US Open. Federer survived a huge scare, rallying from a set down and reeling off six successive points to get past Millman in an epic contest to bring up a century of Australian Open match wins, despite a whopping 82 unforced errors after more than four hours on court.

R1: bt Johnson 6-3 6-2 6-2
R2: bt Krajinovic 6-1 6-4 6-1
R3: bt Millman 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 4-6 7-6 (10-8)

Next up

Fucsovics can look forward to a date with Federer. The unheralded Hungarian matched a career-best fourth-round appearance at a slam – again at Melbourne Park – after upstaging American sensation Tommy Paul in straight sets on Friday. World number 67 Fucsovics has already eliminated 13th seed Denis Shapovalov and Jannik Sinner this month. Fucsovics and Federer have met once before at the Australian Open, the latter triumphing in the last 16 two years ago.

Draw

Federer – eyeing a record-equalling seventh Australian Open title – is on track for a blockbuster semi-final with defending champion Novak Djokovic. It all depends on whether Federer can get past Fucsovics and either 12th seed Fabio Fognini or Tennys Sandgren in the quarters.

What he said

"I think if I do play tennis it's because of winning titles, trying to win as many matches as possible, enjoy myself out on court but also being in epic matches like this. Doesn't always have to be finals, I guess. As long as the crowds are into it, you have a great battle with an opponent who you really admire and respect, it's a good feeling. I'm happy I had that match tonight. I hope I would feel the same way also if I would have lost."

Karolina Pliskova became the latest high-profile casualty at the Australian Open, the second seed stunned by Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in straight sets.  

Defending champion Naomi Osaka and 23-time grand slam winner Serena Williams crashed out at Melbourne Park on Friday.

Pliskova – another women's singles contender – joined the star duo in departing the year's opening slam following Saturday's 7-6 (7-4) 7-6 (7-3) defeat to 30th seed and two-time quarter-finalist Pavlyuchenkova.

A semi-finalist last year, Pliskova had matched or improved her best results at the Australian Open year-on-year since debuting in 2013.

However, the 2016 US Open runner-up was unable to build on her performances at Melbourne Park, where she succumbed to the aggressive Pavlyuchenkova in a gruelling encounter on Rod Laver Arena.

Pavlyuchenkova raced out to a 4-1 lead in the opening set, which was highlighted by a 30-point second game, before eventually prevailing in a tie-break after Pliskova rallied.

Pliskova, who finished with 35 winners and 29 unforced errors, recovered from a slow start in the second to force another tie-break but the Czech star was unable to send the match into a deciding set.

After tallying 51 winners and 43 unforced errors in two hours, 25 minutes, Pavlyuchenkova will face 2016 champion and three-time slam winner Angelique Kerber in the last 16.

Novak Djokovic has barely raised a sweat as his quest for a record-extending eighth Australian Open crown continues against Diego Schwartzman in the Australian Open last 16 on Sunday.

After dropping a set in the first round and winning for the first time at the Australian Open, Djokovic has looked untouchable against back-to-back Japanese opponents.

The reigning champion and 16-time grand slam winner is in ominous form with an 11th quarter-final appearance in 13 years on the horizon.

We take a closer look at Djokovic's form as he prepares to face Schwartzman in Melbourne.

Form and results

Aside from a wobble against Jan-Lennard Struff in the opening round, it has been smooth sailing for Djokovic. The second seed's serve has stood out en route to the fourth round. After winning 93 per cent of his first serves in round two, Djokovic posted an identical figure in a straightforward victory over Yoshihito Nishioka on Friday. Only Milos Raonic (90 per cent) has won more first serves than Djokovic (87) through three rounds.

R1: bt Struff 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 2-6 6-1
R2: bt Ito 6-1 6-4 6-2
R3: bt Nishioka 6-3 6-2 6-2

Next up

Diminutive Argentine 14th seed Schwartzman stands in the way of Djokovic and the last eight at Melbourne Park. Schwartzman prevented an all-Serbian clash after easing past 24th seed Dusan Lajovic in straight sets. Djokovic boasts a 3-0 head-to-head record against Schwartzman, winning the most recent encounter in the Internazionali d'Italia semi-finals last year. Two of the matches have been on clay, with their first meeting at the 2014 US Open.

Draw

The Australian Open is heating up. Should Djokovic get past Schwartzman for the fourth consecutive time, 32nd seed Milos Raonic or 2018 runner-up Marin Cilic await. Looking one step further and a semi-final showdown against 20-time slam champion and rival Roger Federer could be next.

What he said

"I'm very pleased to be plant-based and play on this level now for four and a half years. There has been a lot of criticism also. People around me didn't really think that I could do that. There is a lot of doubt and a lot of question marks. Hopefully I can inspire other athletes that it is possible to be plant-based and to recover well, to have strength, to have muscles. I'm not a weightlifter, of course, but I do have an optimal balance between the strength and power and speed."

Roger Federer shrugged off questions about his high unforced error count after he survived a massive Australian Open scare from John Millman. 

Federer appeared destined for a third-round exit when he fell behind 8-4 in the decisive match tie-break at the end of the fifth set.

Millman had come from two sets to one down to move within two points of victory, but Federer rattled off six successive points to seal his 100th win at the Australian Open 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 4-6 7-6 (10-8) in four hours and three minutes.

The 20-time grand slam champion prevailed despite hitting 82 unforced errors, 48 of them coming off the forehand side.

Asked about that number in his post-match media conference, Federer replied: "I mean, honestly, nothing against the statistics people, but over a four-hour match you're going to hit unforced errors.

"What is an unforced error? Is it when it comes at 120 [kilometres] an hour or 135 or you're on the stretch? So, for me, he pushed me to go for more.

"You know me – I'm not going to hold back and just rally all the time. I will always try to make plays, and for that, I will miss some.

"Of course, sometimes I wish I could have maybe hit a few more winners instead of unforced errors, but, you know, it shows how slow the courts can be, as well, you know, how many rallies get created, how he didn't serve and volley once.

"I served and volleyed maybe what, 10 times? Five times? It's that crazy at these moments. When you can come in and you play serve and volley and, you know, volley errors don't count I don't think ever, and rally errors always count. So, there you go."

Federer was effusive in his praise for Millman, who defeated the Swiss at the 2018 US Open.

"I just think he's just so, so tough from the baseline. He's got sort of good speed on the backhand, on the forehand," added Federer when asked why Millman is such a tough opponent.

"The way he hits it makes it, for me, unsure if I should pull the trigger or I shouldn't. Is it there to be hit or not? Every time I get a ball, I'm in two ways, because I have the option to do that with my game, but then he covers the court very well.

"Because he hits it hard enough, maybe it's harder for me to find [an] angle. I think the biggest problem for me was just I wasn't able to get… I was not returning poorly, per se; I was just not getting into those neutral rallies, finding the ways to unlock him.

"That's his credit. He's a great player. He's got great attitude, and that's why I mumbled something to him at the net just saying, 'I have so much respect for you, and it's such a pity, I'm so sorry, but well played', and all that stuff, because I really feel that way for John."

Stefanos Tsitsipas suffered a surprise Australian Open exit at the hands of Milos Raonic in the third round on Friday.

The Greek was beaten in straight sets and managed not a single break point against the relentless power and precision of the Raonic serve.

Roger Federer ensured his 100th match win at Melbourne Park was among his most memorable as he survived a gruelling five-set encounter with John Millman.

The six-time champion remains on course for a semi-final against Novak Djokovic, who was ruthless in seeing off the challenge of Yoshihito Nishioka.

Roberto Bautista Agut was edged out by Marin Cilic, and there were also wins for Diego Schwartzman, Marton Fucsovics, Tennys Sandgren and Fabio Fognini.

 

RAONIC LEAVES TSITSIPAS REELING AS DJOKOVIC MARCHES ON

There was a shock for sixth seed Tsitsipas, who simply had no answer to the serve and forehand of Raonic in a 7-5 6-4 7-6 (7-2) defeat.

The 21-year-old struggled to make any inroads against the Raonic attack and was unable to muster even a solitary chance of a break against a player yet to drop serve in this year's tournament.

"It's one shot that you can get knocked down all the time, and you're just there, getting punched in the face with one shot. You can't do much," Tsitsipas said of facing the Canadian.

"I'm not saying it's luck. It's a skill. I felt a bit stupid returning his serves."

Defending champion Djokovic was in imperious form, dispatching Nishioka 6-3 6-2 6-2 to keep his quest for an eighth title on track.

Djokovic described the victory as "one of the best serving matches I've had lately" and credited coach Goran Ivanisevic after firing in 17 aces and dropping just eight points on serve to reach the second week in Melbourne for the 12th time.

The Serbian now faces Schwartzman, who saw off Dusan Lajovic 6-2 6-3 7-6 (9-7).

TON UP FOR FEDERER AFTER TIE-BREAK TURNAROUND

Federer's 100th win at the Australian Open was secured at 0048 local time after a marathon encounter with Millman.

The 38-year-old triumphed 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 4-6 7-6 (10-8) after four hours and three minutes of brutal tennis against the Australian, who beat him at the US Open two years ago.

Federer fought back from a set down to lead but, after Millman forced a decider, momentum seemed to have swung his way in front of a crowd for once not overwhelmingly backing the Swiss great.

Millman led 3-0 and 8-4 in the final-set tie-break, but Federer rallied from the brink to earn the first match point and promptly took advantage when a Millman volley offered him a routine passing shot.

"Oh God, it was tough," Federer told Jim Courier on court after the match. "Thank God it was a match tie-break, otherwise I would have lost this one."

Federer will face Fucsovics in round four, the Hungarian having beaten Tommy Paul 6-1 6-1 6-4 in a one-sided match-up.

CILIC OUTLASTS BAUTISTA AGUT AS SANDGREN QUELLS QUERRY

Cilic, the beaten finalist in 2018, claimed a memorable 6-7 (3-7) 6-4 6-0 5-7 6-3 victory over ninth seed Bautista Agut to set up a fourth-round showdown with fellow serving heavyweight Raonic.

An all-American clash went the way of Sandgren, meanwhile, as he beat Sam Querrey 6-4 6-4 6-4.

Sandgren meets Fognini in round four, the Italian making relatively light work of Guido Pella in a 7-6 (7-0) 6-2 6-3 victory.

Roger Federer produced a dramatic late comeback in a fifth-set tie-break to survive a huge scare from John Millman and progress to the fourth round of the Australian Open.

Day five had already seen Serena Williams, Naomi Osaka and Stefanos Tsitsipas dealt shock defeats, and there looked to be another in store as Millman surged into an 8-4 lead in the final-set tie-break having been two sets to one down.

Recent history was also on the side of Millman, who defeated Federer in the 2018 US Open, while the 20-time grand slam champion went into Friday's encounter having lost his previous three five-set matches.

However, Federer somehow reeled off six successive points, a stunning forehand pass securing a 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 4-6 7-6 (10-8) win that marked his 100th at Melbourne Park and booked a last-16 clash with Marton Fucsovics.

The first set the tone for an uncharacteristically error-strewn performance from Federer.

He committed 14 unforced errors in the opener, and a double fault followed by a wayward forehand gifted Millman the early lead.

Millman faced the only break point of the second, but it was vintage Federer in the subsequent tie-break, the Swiss masterful in equal measure at the baseline and the net as he raced into a decisive 6-1 lead.

The third followed a markedly similar pattern with Federer finding no way through the Millman resistance. That was until the 10th game, when the Queenslander's composure cracked and he pushed long to seemingly give Federer control of the match.

But even as the errors crept into his game, Millman displayed a remarkable ability to trade blows with Federer in the longer exchanges and he brought up break point with a superb return before winning a tremendous rally that ended with the Swiss sending a forehand into the net.

Federer was 30-0 ahead in the subsequent game, only for four successive errors to allow Millman to hold, with a love hold then sending an absorbing contest to a fifth.

Another unforced error gave Millman the initiative in the decider and, though he gave the break back and squandered a pair of break points at 3-3, the home hope appeared on course to repeat his 2018 achievement in the tie-break.

Indeed, it was Millman who seemed to have the most left in the tank, and an astonishing cross-court pass put him within two points of victory.

Federer, though, is still capable of defying the odds at the age of 38, and he delivered a reminder that he should never be counted out with an emphatic response that capped an epic of four hours and three minutes in fitting fashion, his forehand passing shot making the most of an indecisive Millman volley.

Roger Federer secured his 100th Australian Open win by beating John Millman in Melbourne on Friday.

The Swiss star has never lost before the third round at the year's first grand slam and his title bid continued with an epic five-set triumph over the home favourite on Rod Laver Arena.

Federer moved onto a century of wins at the Australian Open, a year after reaching the same mark at Wimbledon.

The 20-time grand slam champion became the first man to post 100 wins at a single major by getting to the landmark at the All England Club.

We take a look at five of his best wins at the Australian Open.

 

First round, 2000: bt Michael Chang 6-4 6-4 7-6 (7-5)

Federer's first win at the tournament came 20 years ago, when – ranked 62nd in the world – he upset Chang. Federer had finished 1999 by winning a Challenger Tour event in Brest and he got to the third round in Melbourne before falling to Arnaud Clement. An 18-year-old Federer showcased his talent by beating Chang in his opener, which marked his first main-draw singles win at a grand slam.

Semi-final, 2004: bt Juan Carlos Ferrero [3] 6-4 6-1 6-4

Federer produced a spectacular run on his way to a first Australian Open title in 2004, including rushing past Ferrero in the semi-finals. Having already beaten Lleyton Hewitt and David Nalbandian, Federer needed less than 90 minutes to crush Ferrero and secure the world number one ranking before recording a straight-sets win over Marat Safin in the final.

Semi-final, 2007: bt Andy Roddick [6] 6-4 6-0 6-2

Federer tormented Roddick during the American's career but their last-four clash in 2007 promised to be a thriller, after the Swiss needed four sets to beat the same opponent months earlier in the US Open final. However, it proved to be anything but as Federer crushed Roddick in just 83 minutes. "I was playing out of my mind. I am shocked myself," Federer said afterwards.

Last 16, 2009: bt Tomas Berdych [20] 4-6 6-7 (4-7) 6-4 6-4 6-2

Only once in his illustrious career has Federer come from two sets to love down to win at the Australian Open and it came against the Czech in 2009. Berdych had taken complete control of the encounter before allowing Federer back into the match, the Swiss winning after three hours and 25 minutes. He would go on to reach the final before falling to Rafael Nadal in five sets.

Final, 2017: bt Rafael Nadal [9] 6-4 3-6 6-1 3-6 6-3

Having undergone knee surgery the previous year, Federer started 2017 at the Hopman Cup but, without a major title since his 17th at Wimbledon in 2012, few gave him much of a chance in Melbourne. However, he fought his way into the final before edging Nadal in a thriller, moving onto 18 major titles and leaving his Spanish rival on 14.

World number one Ash Barty made serene progress to the fourth round of the Australian Open as Naomi Osaka and Serena Williams suffered shock exits.

Coco Gauff claimed another famous scalp in the form of defending champion Osaka to join Williams' conqueror Qiang Wang in the next round.

In a mixed day for the American contingent, Alison Riske and Sofia Kenin also went through, but Madison Keys was knocked out in straight sets.

Petra Kvitova was in commanding form as she progressed, while Caroline Wozniacki saw her career come to an end with defeat.

OSAKA DEFENCE ENDS AS SERENA WAIT GOES ON

Gauff got revenge for a rout at the hands of Osaka at the US Open last year to claim the biggest win of her fledgling career, seeing off the number three seed 6-3 6-4.

Beaten 6-3 6-0 in just 65 minutes at Flushing Meadows, 15-year-old Gauff made the most of 30 unforced errors from her opponent to set up a meeting with compatriot Kenin, who defeated Shuai Zhang 7-5 7-6 (9-7).

Williams' wait for a 24th grand slam singles title goes on, the American beaten in 6-4 6-7 (2-7) 7-5 by Wang in a gripping encounter.

The 38-year-old, who hit 56 unforced errors to Wang's 20, confessed afterwards: "I just made far too many errors to be a professional athlete today."

OMINOUS SIGNS FROM BARTY AND KVITOVA

There were no such concerns for Barty, who dispatched Elena Rybakina 6-3 6-2 in 78 minutes.

The home favourite will face Riske in the fourth round, the American outlasting Julia Goerges 1-6 7-6 (7-4) 6-2.

Last year's runner-up Petra Kvitova progressed in similarly imperious fashion, seeing off Russian Ekaterina Alexandrova 6-1 6-2.

Kvitova, who is yet to drop a set at this year's event, will now face Maria Sakkari after her impressive 6-4 6-4 defeat of Keys.

 

TEARFUL WOZNIACKI BOWS OUT

Former world number one Wozniacki saw her career come to an end with a three-set defeat to Ons Jabeur.

The 2018 champion lost 7-5 3-6 7-5 to the Tunisian, who will play a fourth-round match at a major for the first time against Wang.

An emotional Wozniacki, who fought back from 3-0 down in the decider but was decisively broken in the 11th game, said afterwards: "I want to be out there fighting. I fought like my life depended on it."

Two-time grand slam winner Naomi Osaka claimed she still does not have a "champion's mentality" following her stunning defeat to 15-year-old Coco Gauff at the Australian Open.

Osaka's defence of her Melbourne Park crown crumbled at the third-round stage amid a sea of unforced errors as she went down 6-3 6-4 on Rod Laver Arena.

American teenager Gauff appeared the more composed player throughout and Osaka conceded her fragile mindset was holding her back.

She said: "It was one of those days where I couldn't do anything right.

"I don't really have the champion mentality yet, which is someone that can deal with not playing 100 per cent. I have always wanted to be like that, but I guess I still have a long way to go.

"There are moments when you don't play 100 per cent and you still win the match because you don't have to play perfect to win sometimes.

"It's just something that I think some people are born with and some people have to [undergo] trials and stuff to get it."

Osaka described her life as "full of tests" and admitted she is sometimes "overwhelmed".

She added: "I feel like I get tested a lot, like life is just full of tests and unfortunately for me, my tests are tennis matches. So I just have to find a way to navigate through it.

"I feel like there are moments where I can handle them and then there are moments like this where I get overwhelmed and I don't really know what to do in the situation."

Osaka's misery and self-reflection was in stark contrast to Gauff who felt she had learned the lessons of her hammering at the hands of the same opponent at the 2019 US Open.

Asked what she had taken on board from that chastening New York experience, Gauff said: "Definitely the pace of her ball.

"She definitely plays faster than most players. I think at the US Open I wasn't really prepared for that. And today I definitely showed that I worked on that in the offseason."

Following their last meeting, Gauff broke down in tears and was consoled in moving scenes by Osaka.

And the youngster, who meets Sofia Kenin next, will always be grateful for the Japanese's considerate reaction.

"I'm forever thankful for that moment," she said.

"It was a great moment for me, but also the people watching. In sport, sometimes people think we're enemies, and we're not. Some of us are, but most of us, we're all friends.

"Obviously on the court, we take things intense, but a real athlete can absolutely hate you on the court, but off the court they're nice.

"That's what true champions are, and that's why she has two grand slams, because of her on-court personality and off-court personality."

This time there were no tears, no consoling embraces, no emotional speeches, it all seemed crushingly routine. And that was the most remarkable thing of all.

Fifteen-year-old Coco Gauff breezed past defending champion Naomi Osaka and into the fourth round of the Australian Open with a ridiculously accomplished display on Friday.

The last time they met, at the 2019 US Open, Osaka was a 6-3 6-0 victor with the teenager's uncontrolled disappointment at the end met with compassion and grace by the Japanese.

This was no way to repay her, Gauff gaining ruthless revenge – winning 6-3 6-4 in just 67 minutes on Rod Laver Arena - to set up a clash with either Zhang Shuai or Sofia Kenin.

Osaka started well, her blazing groundstrokes threatening to overpower Gauff but the American gradually started to impose her game and, as she did, the errors started to increase from the other side of the net.

Three successive missed backhands handed Gauff a break and a 5-3 lead and, aided by two more mistakes from Osaka's backhand wing, she served it out to love.

Osaka's mental time-out continued at the start of the second, a wild forehand seeing her broken again.

But, finally, the third seed regrouped to hit back immediately and level at 1-1 and then move 2-1 up.

If there was a time for self-doubt it was now, but Gauff never wavered, her consistency from the back of the court in stark contrast to Osaka, who racked up 30 unforced errors in the match.

The majority came on the backhand and it broke down again as Gauff claimed the Osaka serve to edge 4-3 up.

Osaka did, at least, make Gauff serve it out but then handed her the win on a silver platter with another error-strewn game as the world number 67 powered through.

Novak Djokovic believes his serve is at its best and will set him up heading into the second week at the Australian Open.

Djokovic was dominant in a third-round win over Yoshihito Nishioka on Rod Laver Arena on Friday, cruising to a 6-3 6-2 6-2 victory.

The world number two lost just eight points on serve in a comprehensive win and the 16-time grand slam winner feels that part of his game will hold him in good stead.

"You can always improve. I think that's the beauty of the sport. I think in terms of service rhythm that I have at the moment, winning percentage from the first serves is really high," Djokovic told a news conference.

"That's probably as best as my serve can actually be in the moment, which I'm very pleased with. It allows me to go quicker through my games and win more dominantly my service games and put additional pressure on the service games of my opponents.

"That's definitely something that's useful going towards the second week of the grand slam."

Djokovic also mixed 40 winners with 23 unforced errors against Nishioka, setting up a fourth-round clash with Diego Schwartzman.

A seven-time champion in Melbourne, Djokovic said he was satisfied with where his game at.

"From back of the court, I have been playing pretty well, both forehand, backhand side. Very solid backhand, forehand today a lot of winners, not too many unforced errors," he said.

"That's kind of a game style that I would like to maintain and kind of nurture for the second week.

"Obviously I ended up this tournament last year with two fantastic performances against [Lucas] Pouille in the semis and Rafa [Nadal] in the finals. Those were some of the best performances I had ever in the grand slam semis and finals.

"I love playing on the court. I like the conditions. I'm starting to feel very, very comfortable and compact on the court. I'm going to try to keep that going."

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