EFL

Kompany understands Burnley likely to lose players after relegation

By Sports Desk June 24, 2022

Burnley manager Vincent Kompany has acknowledged the Clarets were always likely to lose their more valuable players after Premier League relegation.

The 36-year-old former Manchester City defender took over at Turf Moor after leaving Belgian club Anderlecht, where he spent three years.

Burnley are returning to the Championship after spending six years in the Premier League, with Sean Dyche leaving at the back end of the 2021-22 campaign after ten years with the club.

Interim manager Michael Jackson managed to produce an initial bounce, but it was not enough to keep Burnley up as the Clarets suffered relegation on the final day of the season following a home defeat to Newcastle United.

As such, Burnley are expected to cash in on their high-profile players in the transfer window. Goalkeeper Nick Pope has already left to join Newcastle, while Maxwel Cornet – the club's top scorer in the 2021-22 season – has also been linked with a move away. 

James Tarkowski's contract is expiring and the defender is set to join Everton, while his fellow centre-back Ben Mee is also leaving the club. Dwight McNeil, too, is rumoured to be attracting Premier League interest.

"You always have to expect that some of the more valuable players will move on [after relegation]," Kompany told reporters on Friday.

"We wish them well and are looking forward to bringing in some exciting players.

"It goes with the drop in revenue when you drop out of the Premier League and you have to expect that.

"It is a few players who have perhaps earned the right to move on."

The Clarets are reportedly nearing the signings of Arsenal defender Daniel Ballard, as well as Milton Keynes Dons midfielder Scott Twine.

"We are close to signing a few players," Kompany added. "There is nobody we are bringing in today, I don't think, but we have set up a few medicals."

While his squad seems set to undergo plenty of change, Kompany is excited to get started.

"I have been well received and I have been blending in quite quickly," Kompany added. "I was not in a need to come to Burnley, I had other options.

"We started talking about the problems in the short term and the opportunities long term. I liked how open the ownership were."

Kompany's first competitive match in charge of Burnley comes on July 29 at Huddersfield Town.

Related items

  • Kane admits 'I'd swap everything' for Euro 2024 glory Kane admits 'I'd swap everything' for Euro 2024 glory

    Harry Kane admits he would "swap everything I've done in my career" to win Euro 2024 with England, who face Spain in Sunday's final.

    The Three Lions, who were runners-up to Italy in the delayed Euro 2020, are appearing in their second successive European Championship show-piece, and aiming to go the extra step by claiming their first major tournament silverware since lifting the 1966 World Cup.

    Kane has already made history at this tournament, becoming the record goalscorer in the knockout stages of both the European Championship (six) and major tournaments overall among European players (nine).

    England and Tottenham's all-time leading scorer, the Bayern Munich striker is still seeking the first team trophy of his impressive career, and he is desperate to end that wait in Berlin.

    "It's no secret that I haven't won a team trophy," he told reporters during the pre-match press conference. "Every year that goes by, you are more determined and motivated to change that.

    "I have the opportunity to win one of the biggest [trophies] you can ever win and make history with my nation.

    "I am extremely proud to be English so, no question, I'd swap everything I've done in my career to have a special night and a win tomorrow evening, but that's not the case.

    "[There will be] a lot of hard work from now and until that moment. I'm ready to go and to make tomorrow night a special one."

    It will certainly not be easy for England against the most impressive team of the tournament in Spain, who have won all six of their matches while scoring 13 goals for the loss of just four.

    La Roja have put host nation Germany and France to the sword along the way, and are widely regarded as the favourites to lift the Henri Delaunay cup at the Olympiastadion.

    Asked if he thought that was the case, Kane added: "That's not for me or the players to decide. That's for the media, the fans to think of favourites.

    "But Spain have had a fantastic tournament. They have probably been the best team, consistency-wise throughout the tournament, so they probably earn that right, but as we know in football, in one game, anything can happen.

    "We back ourselves against anyone we play against. We've been through difficult spells in this tournament, but we've come through the other side. That builds a tremendous amount of belief and resilience, which is everything you need in a final.

    "We expect a tough game. We're in a European final, so we expect nothing less, and Spain will be difficult tomorrow night."

  • England must win Euro 2024 to earn 'respect of the footballing world', Southgate insists England must win Euro 2024 to earn 'respect of the footballing world', Southgate insists

    Gareth Southgate believes England must win Euro 2024 on Sunday if they are to earn "the respect of the footballing world".

    The Three Lions face Spain in the tournament's climax at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, aiming to land only the second major silverware of their history - 58 years after their World Cup triumph on home soil.

    Runners-up to Italy at the delayed Euro 2020, England are only the fourth different nation to appear in successive European Championship finals - along with Spain, Germany and the Soviet Union.

    Southgate, who has led his nation to their first major tournament final on foreign soil, has also guided them to the 2018 semi-finals and 2022 quarter-finals at the two World Cups he has overseen.

    And the Three Lions head coach acknowledges all that is missing is a trophy.

    "We tried to change the mindset from the start," he told reporters during his pre-match press conference. "We tried to be more honest about where we were as a football nation.

    "I've travelled to World Cups, European Championships watching as an observer and watched highlight reels of matches on the big screens - and we weren't in any of them.

    "We needed to change that. We had high expectations, but they didn't match where we were performance-wise. Now, the high expectations are still there, but we've had consistent performances, certainly over three of the last four tournaments and a quarter-final in the fourth.

    "In the end, you have to be in the latter stages of tournaments to learn how to win the big games. A lot of records we have broken, but we know we have to do this one, to get this trophy to really feel the respect of the footballing world."

    England endured an underwhelming start in Germany, topping Group C despite winning just one of their three games and scoring just two goals.

    Jude Bellingham's stoppage-time strike and Harry Kane's extra-time header rescued them in their last-16 tie against Slovakia, while a penalty shootout was required to see off Switzerland in the quarter-finals.

    Southgate switched from a 4-2-3-1 formation to a 3-4-3 in the latter contest, and stuck with that in the semi-finals, where England produced their best performance of the tournament as they saw off the Netherlands thanks to Ollie Watkins' last-gasp winner.

    "We've had to find a different way of playing as the tournament progressed," the Three Lions head coach added. 

    "We've been trying to find the right blend and balance for our attacking players because we've got super talent, but a lot who like to operate in similar areas.

    "We feel we've started to find that balance. We've looked dangerous, like we could score goals again, and I'm happy with where the team were at going into this game."

  • Navas confirms international retirement after Euro 2024 final Navas confirms international retirement after Euro 2024 final

    Jesus Navas confirmed he will retire from international duty following Spain's Euro 2024 final showdown with England on Sunday.

    The 38-year-old, who will bring the curtain down on an international career spanning 15 years, is the last remaining member of La Roja's 2010 World Cup and 2012 European Championship-winning sides.

    Navas has appeared three times for Spain during this tournament, captaining the side in their final Group B game against Albania, while deputising for the suspended Dani Carvajal at right-back in the semi-final win over France.

    The Sevilla wing-back, who will call time on his professional career later this year, admitted he has played through the pain barrier in recent years.

    Speaking ahead of Sunday's final, Navas highlighted similarities between Spain's current crop and the side that won three successive major international honours from 2008 to 2012.

    Although, he only lifted the lid on his international future following a conversation with skipper Alvaro Morata. 

    "[Morata] told me that it was time for me to speak since it is my last game with Spain!" he told reporters during the pre-match press conference.

    "I have been having a problem with my hip for four or five years, but playing for my country is everything for me.

    "I just want to leave everything on the pitch. You have to die for every moment here, for your team and your country. It is the biggest thing, and I am so proud of that.

    "Afterwards, everything hurts, but it is about giving it all you have on the day, to be the same person with the same kind of humility.

    "I am excited about everything that I have done in football and in the national team. Being here as a 38-year-old is unique and incredible.

    "In those years of success, we were a team both on and off the pitch. That was noticeable when we played, and it is the same here."

© 2023 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.