Fraser-Pryce to clash with American upstart Richardson, Asher-Smith in 2021 Diamond League opener

By April 29, 2021

It is the clash the world has been waiting for and it comes May 23 at the Müller Grand Prix in Gateshead, the first Wanda Diamond League meeting this year.

Rising American star Sha’ Carri Richardson will take on two-time Olympic champion and four-time world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in the 100m in a much-anticipated matchup in the United Kingdom.

Defending Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah and European champion Dina Asher-Smith will also add spice to the potentially sizzling showdown.

Richardson, who is trained by Dennis Mitchell, stunned the world on April 10 when she blazed to a world-leading 10.72 at the Miramar South Florida Invitational.

It was the fastest time run by a woman that early in the season and announced to the world the potential threat she poses to the Jamaican stranglehold on the Olympic blue-riband event since Fraser-Pryce became the first Jamaican woman to win an Olympic 100m title in Beijing in 2008.

Fraser-Pryce defended her title in 2012 but was defeated by Thompson-Herah at Rio 2016. Richardson represents the USA’s best hope of breaking that hold.

Meanwhile, Asher-Smith, the reigning European 100 and 200m champion should not be overlooked. Second to Fraser-Pryce at the 2019 World Championships in Doha, the Briton has not raced outdoors so far this season but looked sharp in a couple of indoor meets in Germany in January.

The first Wanda Diamond League event of 2021 was due to take place in Rabat but has been moved to Gateshead due to the coronavirus pandemic. It means Gateshead International Stadium will be staging its first international Grand Prix meeting since 2010.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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