Cuban-born Jordan Diaz Fortun produces third-longest triple jump in history to win gold at European Championships

By June 11, 2024
Jordan Diaz Fortun celebrating gold at the European Championships in Rome. Jordan Diaz Fortun celebrating gold at the European Championships in Rome. European Athletics

Cuban-born Spanish triple jumper Jordan Diaz Fortun produced a spectacular performance to win triple jump gold on day five at the European Championships in Rome on Tuesday.

The 23-year-old, who switched allegiance from Cuba to Spain in November 2022, produced a championship record and world-leading 18.18m to take gold ahead of Portugal’s Pedro Pablo Pichardo and France’s Thomas Gogois.

Diaz Fortun led the competition after the first round with a 17.56m jump before Pichardo, who also switched allegiance from Cuba in 2017, produced the world’s first 18m jump since 2021 with 18.04m to take the lead in the second round.

The Spaniard’s next two efforts were 17.82m in the second round and 17.96m in the fourth round after a third-round foul, finding himself just short of Pichardo’s mark heading into round five.

In that fifth round, he produced what is now the third-longest triple jump of all time with a breathtaking 18.18m, only trailing Christian Taylor’s 18.21m and Jonathan Edwards’s world record 18.29m.

Diaz Fortun’s jump also established a new European Championship record, eclipsing Edwards’s 17.99m set back in 1998.

Pichardo’s next three best jumps after his monstrous 18.04m in round two were 17.55m in round three, 17.47m in round five and 17.92m in round six.

Gogois produced a personal best 17.38m in the sixth round to secure the bronze medal.

  

Bradley Jacks

Bradley Jacks is a budding journalist and an avid sports fan. His love of research and sports has led him to SportsMax.tv, a place where those passions work hand in hand to allow him to produce content.

Related items

  • Williams headlines four-member Barbados team for Paris Olympics Williams headlines four-member Barbados team for Paris Olympics

    As expected, Sada Williams headlines a four-member Barbados team to the Paris 2024 Olympics.

    The 26-year-old World Bronze medallist is one of two track and field athletes who will compete for Barbados at the July 26-August 12 event.

    Williams, who trains in Jamaica, will contest the Women's 400 metres, while sprinter Tristan Evelyn is set to take part in the Women's 100 metres.

    Matthew Wright is the lone Triathlete while the other competitor is swimmer Jack Kirby, who gained a Universality Place.

  • '92 Olympic silver medallist Winthrop Graham excited about Jamaica's “long overdue” rise in the 400m hurdles '92 Olympic silver medallist Winthrop Graham excited about Jamaica's “long overdue” rise in the 400m hurdles

    In the world of track and field, the 400m hurdles is an event that combines speed, stamina, and precision. For Jamaica, a nation renowned for its sprinting prowess, achieving excellence in this gruelling discipline has been a long journey.

    Winthrop Graham, the former national record holder and Olympic silver medallist, recently expressed his delight and satisfaction in seeing two young Jamaican athletes finally break the 48-second barrier in the 400m hurdles—a milestone he believes was long overdue.

    Graham's illustrious career includes setting a national record of 47.63 seconds at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, where he secured a silver medal behind Kevin Young's world record-breaking performance of 46.78 seconds. A year later, at the World Championships in Helsinki, Graham slightly improved his record to 47.60 seconds, earning another silver medal. This record stood unchallenged for three decades, a testament to Graham's remarkable talent and perseverance.

    However, the 2023 World Championships in Budapest marked a turning point for Jamaican hurdling. During the semi-finals, Roshawn Clarke smashed Graham's long-standing record, heralding a new era for Jamaica in the event. Less than a year later, Malik James-King joined the elite club of 47-second hurdlers, delivering a stunning lifetime best of 47.42 seconds at the national championships, dethroning Clarke as the reigning champion.

    Witnessing these historic performances from the sidelines, Graham was overwhelmed with joy. "I was sitting watching with a big smile," Graham told Sportsmax.TV. "Because, more than anyone else probably, I am absolutely excited to see them performing like that. This was way overdue."

    While Clarke finished second to James-King with a time of 48.04 seconds with Jaheel Hyde knocking at the door with a season’s best 48.35, Graham remains confident in Clarke's potential. "For sure, I watched his races last year and I watched his races now and I can tell he is not where he should be but he will get there. I mean, it is still early in the season. Usually, this is the time you start fine-tuning your steps and I can tell he is not exactly where he was last year but you can tell his strength and speed are there, it's just about getting the technique together."

    Graham's insights reflect his deep understanding of the sport and his faith in the next generation of Jamaican hurdlers. He believes the fierce competition between James-King and Clarke will drive both athletes to new heights. "It was an absolutely unbelievable finish from Malik James-King to run the time he ran but it is good to have two athletes to push each other. I wish I had that."

  • On edge: Nayoka Clunis's Olympic dream in limbo after JAAA blunder On edge: Nayoka Clunis's Olympic dream in limbo after JAAA blunder

    Jamaica’s hammer thrower Nayoka Clunis finds herself in a state of uncertainty as she faces a significant hurdle in her prospects to make a long-awaited Olympic Games appearance in Paris.

    Despite achieving a National Record of 71.83 metres in May, which ranked in the top 32 in the world this year, Clunis’s dream of competing on the world’s biggest stage is now hanging in the balance due to a blunder from the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA).

    The 28-year-old, who placed second and the JAAA National Senior Championships, initially believed she was on her way to the Olympics had her excitement turned to dismay when she learned that her name was omitted from the JAAA’s official list submitted to World Athletics.

    “Following the Jamaican Olympic Trials, I was elated to receive notification of my official selection to Team Jamaica. Unfortunately, I have since found myself in a difficult position. Due to an omission made by the Jamaican Athletics Administration Association, my name was not officially submitted to World Athletics. As such, I do not have a position in the Olympic Games,” Clunis shared in a post on X, formerly Twitter.

    Still, as the clock ticks down to the July 26 to August 11 global multi-sport showpiece, Clunis remains hopeful that the JAAA will rectify the situation, allowing her to take her rightful place in Paris.

    “I have been assured that all possible remedies are being explored and that there is hope that this issue may soon be resolved. I thank those who are fighting on my behalf for my rightful inclusion. I am a proud Jamaican. To wear our nation's colours at the Olympic Games will be the pinnacle of my athletic career,” Clunis declared.

    While she awaits a resolution, Clunis’s plight underscores the importance of strong administrative leadership, as that oversight by the JAAA could very well rob an athlete that has shown remarkable dedication and prowess in her sport, the opportunity to achieve her dream on the global stage.

    Last year, she became the first Jamaican, male or female, to compete in the Hammer Throw competition at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

    “I pray for a swift and positive resolution, and until such time as one comes, will not have any further comment,” Clunis’s post ended.

     

© 2023 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.