Olympian Candice McLeod delighted at winning UWI Premier Award. "Awards make my mommy happy," she says

By April 15, 2022

Holy Thursday was an extra special day for Tokyo Olympics bronze medalist Candice McLeod, who was presented with the University of the West Indies Premier Award for Sports at the university's Mona campus

The annual award is given to an individual who has achieved excellence in at least one sport, culture or service activity while representing the university as well as a suitable role model in discipline, team building and human relations.

The individual must also demonstrate qualities such as self-motivation, self-discipline, willingness to serve voluntarily, serve fellow students, honesty, integrity, initiative and the ability to motivate others.

McLeod, 25, made her first Olympic team in 2021 and finished fourth in the 400m final in Tokyo before winning the bronze medal as a member of Jamaica’s 4x400m relay team. She would return home to graduate with an honours degree in Accounting and Management Studies.

 McLeod, who was winning the award for a second time, credits her mother Marcia Thomas and her mentor and former high school coach Shanikie Osbourne for inspiring her to strive for excellence.

“Before I won the first one in 2019, it was a goal of mine to attend the UWI Awards ceremony whether it was for sports or academics. When I saw how happy my mommy was when she came to the awards with me in 2019, it was so overwhelming and encouraging,” she said.

“This award brings the same feeling. Awards make my mommy and once she is happy I am happy. She keeps them all, even if it is an article with my name, she cuts it out and frames it. Everything really is for the support I have had from day one from my loved ones.

“Shanikie, her drive to succeed in whatever she does, has helped me be the person I am today. I am doing it for them both.”

So far, McLeod’s season has been going well.

On April 2, she ran 51.78 for second place behind Shericka Jackson (51.29) at the National Stadium in Kingston and then on April 9, she was also second to Jackson at the Bermuda Games where she clocked 51.57. Jackson, her best friend, won in a time of 51.40.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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