Motivated by quest for new challenges, Jamaican triple jumper Jaydon Hibbert takes professional leap with Puma - agent confirms

By January 26, 2024

In a strategic move fueled by the desire for fresh challenges and a lack of competitive challenges at the collegiate level, Jamaican triple jumper Jaydon Hibbert has secured a significant long-term contract with Puma. As was first reported by Sportsmax.TV late Thursday (25), the 19-year-old sensation, who enjoyed a remarkable freshman year at the University of Arkansas, has chosen to embark on a professional journey while continuing his studies at the esteemed institution.

Henry Rolle, the principal at Preeminence Sports Group and Hibbert's agent, shed light on the decision-making process, emphasizing the athlete's motivation to seek new horizons after achieving unparalleled success at the collegiate level. Hibbert's undefeated streak in both indoor and outdoor competitions during his freshman year highlighted his dominance, prompting a thoughtful evaluation of his next steps.

Hibbert set a World U20 record of 17.54m to win the NCAA Indoor title. He won the outdoor title with a world-leading 17.87m, an NCAA record and World U20 record. Just 18, he capped his incredible season by winning the coveted Bowerman Award in December 2023, becoming the first freshman, the youngest ever collegiate athlete and the first Jamaican to claim the award it’s 25-year history.

Rolle provided key insights into Hibbert's decision, stating, "There was really nothing to motivate him competing at the collegiate level, and he discussed it with his coach and his parents, and, of course, he had that NIL with Puma." Rolle emphasized that the decision was entirely driven by Hibbert's quest for greater challenges and personal growth.

The long-term contract with Puma signifies a crucial milestone for Hibbert's professional aspirations. Despite the transition to a professional career, the Jamaican triple jumper remains committed to completing his education at the University of Arkansas, showcasing a balanced approach to athletic and academic pursuits.

Reflecting on the financial feasibility and the athlete's personal goals, Rolle remarked, "It is a long-term deal that makes it feasible for him to complete his education." This strategic approach ensures that Hibbert can continue his studies while receiving the support and sponsorship necessary for his professional development.

Hibbert's decision to sign with Puma and embrace professionalism was made apparent in a heartfelt message shared on his Instagram page. In the post, he expressed gratitude to the University of Arkansas for its pivotal role in shaping him as both an athlete and an individual. The Razorback spirit instilled during his collegiate journey will accompany him into the professional realm.

“University of Arkansas you have been more than just a school to me. You have been a family. To all my coaches, teammates and professors, you’ve shaped me into the athlete and the person I am today. You’ve instilled in me the Razorback spirit which I will carry with me on my professional journey,” he posted on Instagram.

 “This journey has been filled with unforgettable moments, victories and lessons that I wouldn’t trade for anything. The roar of the crowd at every track meet, the camaraderie, the grind, the triumphs and even the injuries…each has carved a piece and my heart and soul.

“As I say goodbye to my NCAA eligibility and step into my professional career, I do so with a heart full of gratitude. I am not leaving behind the Razorback family; I am taking it with me.”

Hibbert will not compete indoors but will likely participate at a few outdoor collegiate meets in Arkansas and the wider USA before deciding which competitions including Diamond League meets he will be take part in prior to the Jamaica national championships and the Olympics in Paris in July, Rolle said.

 

 

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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