Track and Field icon Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce spearheads Jamaica's legacy of greatness

By July 02, 2023
Five-time World 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. Five-time World 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce.

At the heart of Jamaica's remarkable legacy in track and field, among the names that stand out as a symbol of excellence and inspiration is one Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce.

With a record five 100m world titles and two Olympic blue-ribbon titles to her name, Fraser-Pryce is part of a golden era of Jamaican sprinters that includes illustrious figures like Usain Bolt, Melaine Walker, Veronica Campbell Brown and many more.

Her journey from a young girl in Waterhouse to a global athletics icon is a testament to the power of determination and talent.

"It definitely feels good, I think for me, especially coming from, you know, Waterhouse, a young girl who didn't, you know, know where she would end up in the future," Fraser-Pryce shared in an interview with Black Enterprise.

"But to be able to be one of the icons of our country is really phenomenal. And being able to give inspiration to other young girls who are coming from similar situations as I was, or even now, being able to relate to where I'm at on my journey, whether it's on motherhood, age, or a lot of things. So being able to drive that, you know, here in my hometown, being able to say that I'm homegrown, being able to say that."

Fraser-Pryce's success has not only made her a sporting legend but also a hometown hero. She acknowledges the support of the people of Jamaica, saying, "A lot of who I am is because of the people of Jamaica and how much they have poured into me, and their support has always been so constant."

Representing her country and community fills her with immense pride, knowing that she carries their hopes and dreams with her on the world stage.

Being part of Jamaica's golden era of track and field athletes has driven Fraser-Pryce to continuously raise the bar.

"I think that helps us to elevate who we are as a country and as women when we step on the line to know that we have such a rich history when it comes to track and field," she stated. It motivates her to give her all, showcasing the strength and prowess of Jamaican athletes to the world.

Despite being a small island nation, Fraser-Pryce firmly believes that Jamaica's athletes have made a significant impact. "You always want to make sure that we, you know, we show up, and I show up, and being able to put our country first because we understand what limited resources mean," she said. Fraser-Pryce wants to inspire young athletes in Jamaica that greatness can be achieved even on their home turf with the right mindset and determination.

"We're little, but we tallawah," Fraser-Pryce emphasized. "It's not about the size but the punch. So we're able to really make a statement globally, and we're really appreciative of all that we've been able to accomplish."

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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