124 Olympic/Paralympic aspirants to benefit from JMD$45m in government support

By April 08, 2021

The Jamaican government will provide more than JMD$45 million in direct financial support to athletes preparing for this summer’s Tokyo Olympic Games and Paralympic Games.

The funding will be provided under the Government’s Athletes Assistance Programme that was initiated last year but which was discontinued after the Olympics Games were postponed because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

“The Ministry in collaboration with the Institute of Sports is providing financial support for those who are preparing for the Olympics.  Approximately 124 athletes will benefit from the initiative,” said Jamaica’s Sports Minister Olivia Grange.

“They will be provided with funds at two week periods from now through to the Olympics.  It will total approximately 45 million dollars in support.”

Athletes in six disciplines including swimming, rugby, gymnastics, boxing, karate and track and field will begin receiving disbursements in a matter of days as the final list of athletes is now being validated by the Athletes Assistance Programme Committee.

Payment of stipends to Paralympic athletes will begin in three weeks in keeping with the commitment of the Government of Jamaica to provide support for 18 weeks leading up to the Paralympic Games.

The Athletes Assistance Programme was implemented for the first time in March 2020. The programme was suspended after International Olympic Committee and the Japanese government decided to postpone the Games.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

Related items

  • Jake Paul 'still doubts' whether Tommy Fury fight will go ahead Jake Paul 'still doubts' whether Tommy Fury fight will go ahead

    Jake Paul "definitely still doubts" whether his planned bout with Tommy Fury next month will go ahead.

    It was announced last week that YouTube sensation Paul and reality television personality Fury will meet in Saudi Arabia on February 26.

    They came face-to-face on Saturday during the uncared for the Anthony Yarde versus Artur Beterbiev bout, with security having to step in.

    However, after previous fights between the pair scheduled for December 2021 and August last year were called off, Paul is wary of his opponent withdrawing once again.

    "A part of me definitely still doubts," Paul is quoted as saying by BBC Sport.

    "It's scary and it's annoying, and the kid's not necessarily reliable but the money's good, for him, so he would be just so dumb [not to go ahead with the fight]."

    Paul confirmed MMA fighter Mike Perry, who left UFC two years ago, has been placed on standby to fill in should Fury pull out.

    The 26-year-old's move to boxing from the social media world has drawn plenty of criticism, but Fury would be the first professional boxer he has faced in a six-fight career to date.

    "I'm validated. I've done everything I needed to do in this sport for me personally," Paul said. 

    "I've proved everything to myself but it will be nice to take on a professional boxer, one with a big name, a tonne of credibility.

    "He's been fighting since he was 10, 11 years old and I've only been doing this for three years.

    "It's another stepping stone because I want to become world champion. I want to and I will. I'm capable of it and no one's believed in me.

    "When I said that four fights ago people laughed, they don't want to believe that's possible because of my background.

    "But I believe anything is possible if you set your mind to it and dedicate your whole entire life and have a little bit of natural talent, which I happen to have."

  • Thompson-Herah opens with outdoor 7.15s 60m win at Queens/Grace Jackson Invitational Thompson-Herah opens with outdoor 7.15s 60m win at Queens/Grace Jackson Invitational

    Elaine Thompson-Herah began her 2023 campaign with a victory over 60m at the Queen's/Grace Jackson Invitational at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

  • Can Jamaica's growing stock of female sprint hurdlers rise to global dominance? Can Jamaica's growing stock of female sprint hurdlers rise to global dominance?

    For more than a decade now, Jamaica’s women have bossed the 100m.  Veronica Campbell-Brown won Jamaica’s first global 100m gold medal in Osaka in 2007 and since then Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson-Herah have basically made the 100m their own with the former winning five world titles and two Olympic titles while Thompson won back to back 100m titles in Brazil in 2016 and 2021 in Tokyo, Japan where she established a new Olympic record of 10.61.

    However, with their dominance of the blue-ribbon sprint at its zenith, the women from the land of wood and water seem poised to begin dominating yet another event, the 100m hurdles. Since the 1990s, Jamaica has done reasonably well at the sprint hurdles.

    Michelle Freeman was the first Jamaican woman to reach a global final and eventually won won global medals in 1993 and 1997. Dionne Rose and Freeman were Jamaica's first ever Olympic finalists, finishing fifth and sixth, respectively in 1996.

    The following year Freeman and Gillian Russell, a 1995 World Championships finalist, went 1-2 at the World Indoor Championships.

    Brigitte Foster-Hylton and Delloreen Ennis-London picked up from them with the former winning silver  at the 2003 World Championships, bronze in 2005. Ennis-London won a silver and bronze at the 2005 and 2007 World Championships respectively.

    Foster-Hylton made the breakthrough at the 2009 World Championships in Berlin with a fantastic run to give Jamaica gold, Ennis-London won the bronze. Danielle Williams won Jamaica’s second 100m hurdles gold in Beijing 2015 in Beijing and followed with a bronze medal in 2019.

    Two years later, Megan Tapper created history for Jamaica when she became the first-ever Jamaican woman to win a medal in the 100m hurdles at an Olympic Games when she captured bronze in Tokyo, Japan.

    Then at the 2022 World Championships in Eugene, Oregon, Britany Anderson, a finalist in Tokyo in 2021, won silver in the sprint hurdlers.

    Tapper and Anderson are among a growing cadre of Jamaican female sprint hurdlers who are among the very best in the world. Among them are Ackera Nugent, the World U20 60m hurdles record holder who opened her 2023 season with a time of 8.00 indoors and Demisha Roswell, who ran a personal best 12.44 and is the fastest Jamaican woman in the world this year over the 60m hurdles with a 7.98 clocking this past weekend.

    There is also hope that former national record holder Janeek Brown will make a successful return to the event this season after two years of disruption in her personal life and athletic career. Perhaps, the most talented of the lot is 17-year-old Kerrica Hill, who last year succeeded Nugent as World Under 20 champion and who recently turned professional.

    In 2022, Jamaica had four of the 10 fastest women in the world. The USA also had four while Puerto Rico and Nigeria had one each.

     If Jamaica’s women are to reach the pinnacle and find some level of dominance it will require a lot of technical work and consistently fast hurdling to get there but if the 100m women are anything to go by, nothing is beyond their reach.

     

© 2022 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.