Nkrumie equals national junior record to advance to 100m final at World U-20 Championships

By August 02, 2022

Jamaica’s Bouwahjgie Nkrumie equaled Yohan Blake and Christopher Taylor's national junior record of 10.11 to advance to the final of the Men’s 100m at the World Under-20 Athletics Championships in Cali, Colombia on Tuesday.

Nkrumie produced the record performance to win semi-final three and advance to the final scheduled for later on Tuesday. Grenada’s Nazzio John narrowly missed out on a place in the final despite a personal best 10.31 to finish third in semi-final three.

Jamaican National junior champion Sandrey Davison unfortunately fell to the track shortly after leaving the blocks after suffering an apparent leg injury in the second semi-final. Cuba’s Reynaldo Espinosa advanced as a fastest loser from that heat courtesy of a personal best 10.29 to finish third.

In the 110m hurdles, Antoine Andrews of the Bahamas ran 13.39 to win semi-final two and advance as the fastest qualifier. Jamaica's Demario Prince will join him in the final after a second-place finish in semi-final one in 13.58, a personal best.

Related items

  • Bolstered by patience and trust, Shericka Jackson eyes even faster times in 2023 Bolstered by patience and trust, Shericka Jackson eyes even faster times in 2023

    Shericka Jackson credits patience and trust as the main pillars behind her success in 2022 and believes she could potentially be even better in 2023.

    Jackson, the 2022 World 200m champion and the second fastest woman of all time over the distance, had an outstanding year in which she won her first individual world title and was the NACAC 100m champion. She also won Jamaica’s 100 and 200m titles in 10.77 and 21.55, respectively.

    Along the way she achieved a new personal best of 10.71 in the 100m. Only her compatriot and friend Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce with seven times under 10.70s ran faster in 2022.

    The 21.45 she ran to win the gold medal in Eugene, Oregon, was a new national record and championship record. Only Florence Griffith-Joyner of the USA (21.34) has run faster.

    Her patience, she said, and trust in her coach, made all the difference last year after coming off injury in 2020 when stress fractures in her shins threatened to derail her promising career.

    “For me, last year it was about being patient, trusting yourself and trusting your coach and I think I did just that and it actually paid off very well,” said Jackson, who was runner-up to Fraser-Pryce at the recent RJR Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year Awards.

    Both athletes shared the prize as top track and field athletes for 2022.

    For the coming season, Jackson said she is excited about the coming season and once she remains healthy, she believes she could go even faster in 2023 as the lessons of last season should have a significant bearing on what comes next.

    “Coach and I have been working really hard on the parts of the race that I needed to be fixed and I think we are getting there step by step, no rush,” said Jackson, who ran 10.73 for the 100m silver medal in Oregon last season.

    “Last year, I think I was being very impatient in wanting to get the start right and putting a lot of pressure on myself. So this year, coach and I sat and we had a conversation. It’s just about being patient and I think I will get there eventually.”

     

  • IOC opens door to Russian and Belarusian athletes at Paris 2024 amid war in Ukraine IOC opens door to Russian and Belarusian athletes at Paris 2024 amid war in Ukraine

    The International Olympic Committee is considering whether to include Russian and Belarusian athletes under a neutral flag at Paris 2024.

    The two nations are currently banned following the IOC calling on federations to exclude them amid the former's invasion of Ukraine last year.

    On Wednesday, the IOC confirmed they intend to uphold sanctions against state and government officials ahead of next year's games.

    But in a statement, they acknowledged they would explore opportunities for athletes from both nations to compete in France.

    "No athlete should be prevented from competing just because of their passport," the organisation's executive board said.

    "[They would be] neutral athletes and in no way represent their state or any other organisation in their country.

    “No flag, anthem, colours or any other identifications whatsoever of these countries being displayed at any sports event or meeting, including the entire venue."

    The move has been met with criticism however, and comes just weeks after Ukraine's president Volodymyr Zelensky called for athletes to remain barred.

    A joint statement from Athletes for Ukraine and athlete association Global Athlete argued any decision to relax sanctions would endorse the war in Ukraine.

    "The return of Russian and Belarusian athletes to international competition, especially the 2024 Paris Olympic Games, will see the Russian state use athletes once more to bolster the war effort," they said.

    "[This will] distract from the atrocities in Ukraine on one of the biggest multi-sport stages in the world."

    Russian athletes competed under the flag of the Russian Olympic Committee at Tokyo 2020 after the nation was officially banned following multiple doping scandals.

  • Fit again, Demisha Roswell intent on leaving her mark on the NCAA this season Fit again, Demisha Roswell intent on leaving her mark on the NCAA this season

    Healthy again and armed with a new mindset, Demisha Roswell is intent on making her senior year count for Texas Tech in the NCAA this season.

    The 25-year-old former Vere Technical athlete impressed on Friday, January 20, when she ran 7.98 over 60m to finish second to Masai Russell at the Red Raider Open in Lubbock, Texas.

    Kentucky’s Russell won in a world-leading 7.75 but Roswell’s time made her the fastest Jamaican woman in the world this year after eclipsing the 8.00 run by Arkansas’ Ackera Nugent in Fayetteville, Arkansas on January 13.

    It was a welcome return to form from injury for Roswell, who defeated Nugent to win the Big 12 Championships last May, running an outdoor personal best 12.44 for the 100m hurdles.

    However, her celebrations were short-lived as an injury slowed her significantly for the remainder of the season. She was seventh at the NCAA Division I Championships in a pedestrian 12.94 and just missed out on a place on Jamaica’s team to the 2022 World Championships in Eugene, Oregon, when she finished fourth at the Jamaican championships in 12.83.

    Since then, the work she has put in to get healthy again has been  paying off but it wasn’t easy.

    “The background work was somewhat tough for me because I was struggling with my injury plus my mentals, but it paying off little by little,” she said.

    “It (rehab) went well even though I hate it but my coach and trainer were very tough on me to get me back where I’m supposed to be.

    “The time didn’t surprise me at all, to be honest. I’m confident about this season so I’m hoping I keep healthy.”

    Roswell also revealed that she is approaching the new season with a different mindset. She is more focused and committed to being successful this season as she intends to leave her mark in her final year in the NCAA.

    “I want more this year and I want my name to be remembered,” she said.

     

     

     

© 2022 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.