Ukrainian team to participate in Winter Paralympics

By Sports Desk March 01, 2022

The National Paralympic Committee of Ukraine has confirmed that a 29-strong team will represent their country at the upcoming Winter Paralympics in Beijing, despite Russia's invasion of their homeland.

Russia launched an assault on Ukraine late last week, leading to a strong backlash from the international sporting community.

After the International Olympic Committee (IOC) condemned Russia's breach of the Olympic Truce, which remains in place until after the end of the Winter Paralympics, Ukrainian athletes penned an open letter to the IOC and the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) to call for the suspension of Russian and Belarusian athletes ahead of the Winter Games, telling the governing bodies; "your legacy will be defined by your actions."

While the IPC is due to make a decision on Russian and Belarusian participation on Wednesday, Ukrainian Paralympians have moved to confirm that they are departing for the games from undisclosed locations, to compete in biathlon and cross-country skiing events.

"Part of the team is in one place, part is in another," a spokesperson told Public Sports.

"I hope that today we will unite and get to the airport and go to Beijing together. The team is not in Ukraine.

"We will not tell where we are. When we come to Beijing, we will tell. I hope that tomorrow, March 2, we will be in Beijing.

"The team is going [in] full as we planned."

Later that afternoon, a tweet from the official account of the Paralympic Games displayed the Ukrainian athletes prior to their departure for China. 

Related items

  • Skaters must be at least 17 to compete in senior events after Valieva Beijing saga Skaters must be at least 17 to compete in senior events after Valieva Beijing saga

    The minimum age ice skaters must be to compete in senior events has been raised from 15 to 17 for the sake of protecting the "physical and mental health" of competitors.

    The International Skating Union (ISU) announced the change on Tuesday, almost four months after the sport was in the spotlight for the wrong reasons during the Beijing Winter Olympics.

    Russian Kamila Valieva, aged 15 at the time, was provisionally banned during the Games after it came to light that she had tested positive for banned heart medication trimetazidine last December.

    That revelation came just before the Russian Olympic Committee were due to be awarded a gold medal for the team event in which she had competed.

    Valieva was cleared to go for individual gold, but slipped from first place to miss out on a medal after making a string of mistakes in her decisive final routine.

    Rather than consoling a distraught Valieva, her coach, Eteri Tutberidze, instead asked her "why did you stop fighting?" in reference to an initial error on her opening triple axel.

    International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach says it was "chilling" to see the way Valieva was treated by her coach.

    The ISU has now revealed competitors skaters must be 16 to enter senior events from the 2023-24 season and 17 as of the following season.

  • "$55M for participants in Summer, Winter Olympics and Paralympics" - Grange "$55M for participants in Summer, Winter Olympics and Paralympics" - Grange

    The Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Hon. Olivia Grange says the Government is rewarding $55 million to athletes, coaches, and officials who participated in the recent Summer and Winter Olympic Games and the Paralympics.

    “Jamaica is joining other countries which reward those who represent them at the Olympics with honorariums,” Minister Grange said while speaking at the official launch of the 2022 ISSA GraceKennedy Boys and Girls Championships at the National Stadium on Monday.

    “Appreciation Grants will be for those representing Jamaica at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, the Paralympics, and the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympic Games. The level of awards was determined based on individual placement, from gold medal winner to non-finalist, coaches, and other supporting staff. Ninety-three persons will be rewarded, valued at approximately $55M,” she added.

    She then broke down how the money would be divided.

    “The honorariums are $1.65 million for each gold medal won; $1.35 million for each silver medal won and $800,000.00 for each bronze medal won. The honorarium is $850,000 for the relay gold. Finalists are receiving $600,000.00; relay finalists, $500,000; and non-finalists, $350,000. Coaches and massage therapists are getting $350,000 while team managers and doctors are getting $200,000,” Grange explained.

     

  • Bubka called to IOC HQ to spearhead drive to help Ukraine's Olympics stars Bubka called to IOC HQ to spearhead drive to help Ukraine's Olympics stars

    Sergey Bubka has been summoned to Switzerland to lead the Olympic movement's humanitarian response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

    The pole vault legend, now 58, is president of the Ukrainian National Olympic Committee and considered the best-placed figure to spearhead efforts to help those in need.

    The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is based in the Swiss city of Lausanne, and it is there that plans will be drawn up to support Ukrainian athletes and sport bodies affected directly by the Russian invasion.

    IOC president Thomas Bach said in a letter to the Olympic movement that there had been an overwhelming "outpouring of solidarity" from stakeholders towards Ukraine, with efforts already under way to help exiled athletes.

    The IOC has created a solidarity fund, and Bach said it was necessary "to increase the assistance already provided, but also ensure that it is coordinated in an effective manner".

    This is where Bubka comes in, with Bach "urgently" requesting that the long-time former world record holder and IOC member makes himself available "to coordinate all elements of humanitarian assistance to the Ukrainian Olympic community", including the allocation and distribution of funds raised.

    Bach added: "To facilitate this task we will begin collecting information on the whereabouts of these members of the Ukrainian Olympic community as well as ongoing initiatives and support."

    According to Ukraine's National Olympic Committee, in a statement issued this week, Bubka stayed in Ukraine after the Russian attack began.

    He issued a statement on Tuesday that read: "Thank you for all your supportive messages and calls we received from around the world. Ukraine is grateful to the IOC for its full solidarity as well as to its task force for its communications with the NOC of Ukraine for coordination of humanitarian assistance. The war must stop, peace and humanity must win."

© 2022 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.