“We’re not going to yield to anybody”-Kingston College Principal Dave Myrie says plans already in place to continue school’s Champs dominance

By April 03, 2023
Kingston College Principal Dave Myrie hoisting the Mortimer Geddes Trophy. Kingston College Principal Dave Myrie hoisting the Mortimer Geddes Trophy.

Kingston College produced a dominant display to secure their 34th hold on the Mortimer Geddes Trophy at the ISSA Grace Kennedy Boys and Girls Championships held at the National Stadium in Kingston from March 28-April 1.

KC amassed an impressive 366 points, comfortably ahead of rivals Jamaica College (299 points) and Calabar High (207 points) in second and third.

On Monday, the school, celebrating their 98th year of existence, held a ceremony commemorate the historic achievement at their North Street home.

“Never bet against KC,” said Principal Dave Myrie at Monday’s celebration.

“When it comes to these championships, KC’s going to dig deep and we are going to fight. Our motto says ‘The Brave May Fall but Never Yield’ so we’re not going to yield to anybody. When we get out there on the field of play, we are going out there to win. If a better man beats us and wins, we’ll say well done but we are going to continue cheering and supporting our team, win, lose or draw,” he added.

“Elated,” was Head Coach Leaford Grant’s response when asked to describe his emotions after guiding the team to the title.

“Personally, I am elated. We are happy and couldn’t ask for anything else. It has been a challenging year for us but we managed to persevere and now we are champions again,” Grant said.

“We never set out to plan how many points we’re going to score. What we try to do every year is put together a team that we know can score over 300 points. At champs, you have mishaps and different mistakes but that’s something you have to plan around. This year, we made very few mistakes.” he added.

With all that said, the school also had their challenges in the months leading up to champs, as explained by Grant and Myrie.

“Some of the challenges were, like any other school, financial. We had some challenges with youngsters not coming to training as we expected but I think that goes on at every single school, not only KC. At the end of the day, we withstood those challenges,” said Grant.

“Some of our athletes have had challenges, whether it be injuries or stuff like that,” Myrie said.

“We had to be gingerly treating them as we go through. They couldn’t train as hard as they wanted but we had to nurse them through. We got vilified because we opted out of a few races at the Gibson Relays and we just shook our heads. You opt out to ensure that you can actually do what you need to do at Champs because, at the end of the day, Champs is where the points count,” Myrie added.

Distance runner Ainsley Campbell was one of the main contributors to KC’s 34th Boys champs crown, winning the Class 1 1500m as well as the 2000m steeplechase open.

“It’s a great feeling knowing that we got the job done and we didn’t waste an entire year of training,” Campbell said.

“I wasn’t expecting to participate in the 1500m until Carifta Trials but I can say it was a well-earned title. For the steeplechase, I was the favourite so I went out there and did what I had to do,” he added.

Myrie says plans are already in place for KC to continue their dominance in high school track & field for years to come.

“There is definitely a plan in place but, the same way we are planning, other schools are planning as well. I am not going to go out there and say to anybody that we have to win or are going to win, I’m saying we are going to put a team in place that can challenge,” he said.

“If by chance there is a better team out there that beats us then more power to them and I’d congratulate them and say well done but we’re focusing on KC. We don’t focus on too many things outside. We have already started the planning for the next three years down the road to make sure that, at the least, we’re putting out a competent team every year,” Myrie added.

 

 

Bradley Jacks

Bradley Jacks is a budding journalist and an avid sports fan. His love of research and sports has led him to SportsMax.tv, a place where those passions work hand in hand to allow him to produce content.

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