Cricket West Indies (CWI) has scored big with a new technical partnership with leading European sportswear company, Macron, as the official team kit supplier for the West Indies Men’s and Women’s teams.

The fresh collaboration promises to bring a new look to the upcoming Series against England, unveiling redesigned jerseys that encapsulate the iconic West Indies maroon loved by fans worldwide.

Macron, an Italian-based sports apparel manufacturer with over five decades of experience, will supply team playing and training kits for all home and away Test, ODI, and T20I matches. This encompasses the entire spectrum of West Indies cricket, including ‘A’ Teams, Academies, and age group teams.

What sets these jerseys apart is not just their aesthetic appeal but their commitment to sustainability. The high-performance material used in the jerseys is made from 100 per cent PET recycled polyester thread, derived from thirteen recycled bottles, contributing to a reduction in plastic waste and energy consumption.

The unveiling of the new team kit designs is eagerly anticipated, adding an element of excitement to the three-match CG United ODI Series, set to commence at the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium in Antigua on December 3. The subsequent T20I Series, starting on December 12 at the Kensington Oval in Barbados, will further showcase the new Macron-inspired attire.

For fans looking to emulate their cricketing heroes, Macron’s online store will offer the new range of playing and training apparel, caps, polo shirts, and other accessories. Caribbean fans will have the chance to purchase these items at the venues hosting the West Indies vs. England Series through a click-and-collect service via CWI’s online channels or at West Indies merchandise stands.

Dominic Warne, CWI Commercial Director, expressed excitement about the partnership, stating, "The new kit will be loved by fans, players, and will also help the environment." He highlighted the positive environmental impact of using recycled plastic bottles in production, emphasizing the alignment with CWI’s goals of increasing sustainability and reducing plastic waste.

Macron CEO, Gianluca Pavanello, underscored the significance of partnering with West Indies Cricket, stating, "This further confirms the quality and reliability of the teamwear we supply."

As West Indies fans eagerly await the new era in cricket fashion, the stage is set for a memorable series against England, with the hope of seeing lots of maroon in the stands and the streets.

 Full Match Schedule:

 December 3: 1st CG United ODI at Sir Vivian Richards Stadium, Antigua – 9:30 am

December 6: 2nd CG United ODI at Sir Vivian Richards Stadium, Antigua – 1:30 pm

December 9: 3rd CG United at Kensington Oval, Barbados – 1:30 pm

December 12: 1st T20I at Kensington Oval, Barbados – 6 pm

December 14: 2nd T20I at Grenada National Stadium, Grenada – 1:30 pm

December 16: 3rd T20I at Grenada National Stadium, Grenada – 1:30 pm

December 19: 4th T20I at Brian Lara Cricket Academy, Trinidad – 4 pm

December 21: 5th T20I at Brian Lara Cricket Academy.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has imposed a six-year ban on former West Indies batter Marlon Samuels following his involvement in corrupt behavior during the Abu Dhabi T10 in 2019. Samuels, who was part of the Karnataka Tuskers but did not play in the tournament, was found guilty on four counts, including accepting favors that brought himself and the game into disrepute and concealing information from investigating authorities.

This ban is a result of an independent tribunal's findings, and it comes 15 years after Samuels had previously been punished for a similar offense. The ICC found him in violation of several anti-corruption codes during the Abu Dhabi T10.

"Samuels played international cricket for close to two decades, during which he participated in numerous anti-corruption sessions and knew exactly what his obligations were under the Anti-Corruption Codes," said Alex Marshall, the head of ICC's HR and Integrity Unit. "Though he is retired now, Mr. Samuels was a participant when the offenses were committed. The ban of six years will act as a strong deterrent to any participant who intends to break the rules."

The Abu Dhabi T10, being an Emirates Cricket Board-run tournament, operates under its anti-corruption code. The ICC, by their rules, conducts investigations into breaches. Samuels was found guilty on four counts, including failing to disclose the receipt of gifts or benefits that could bring the sport into disrepute, failing to disclose receipt of hospitality with a value of US $750 or more, failing to cooperate with the investigation, and obstructing or delaying the investigation by concealing relevant information.

Samuels' ban takes effect from November 11, 2023. He was initially charged by the ICC in September 2021, and the verdict was reached in August of this year.

Marlon Samuels, who played a pivotal role in West Indies' T20 World Cup victories in 2012 and 2016, announced his retirement in November 2020, having amassed over 11,000 international runs across formats. His career was not without controversy, with a previous two-year ban in 2008 for "receiving money, benefit, or other reward that could bring him or the game of cricket into disrepute."

 

Former West Indies captain Dwayne Bravo issued some scathing criticism towards lead selector for the West Indies Men’s Team, the hon. Desmond Haynes, as well as white ball head coach, Daren Sammy, after his younger brother Darren was overlooked for the upcoming three-match home series against England.

Darren Bravo, 34, recently led the Trinidad & Tobago Red Force to the CG United Super50 Cup title and finished the tournament as the leading run-scorer with 416 runs in eight innings at an average of 83.20 with one hundred and three fifties.

His production proved to be not enough in the eyes of the selectors, however, as they opted to go with younger players who they have invested in with an eye on the 2027 World Cup, according to Haynes in a press conference on Monday.

“SMH!!! When will the BS stop?!” I’m not surprised with my brother’s non-selection, but with the recent changes in WI cricket management, I held onto a bit of hope for the better,” Bravo said in a statement on Instagram on Monday.

“This is NOT acceptable, and I just can’t make sense of it! So here are my burning questions: What’s the criteria for West Indies team selection? Surely, it can’t be solely based on performance?” he added.

The former all-rounder then went into the aforementioned stats that Darren bravo put together in the Super50 Cup before asking more questions.

“I usually stay away from these discussions but the mistreatment, disrespect, and dishonesty towards players over the years demand a voice. When will it stop? When will this BS actually stop?”

He then directed his ire toward Haynes, Sammy, and newly appointed director of cricket Miles Bascombe.

“To Mr. Desmond Haynes, your statement didn’t surprise me. It feels like another former player singing for his supper. I hoped for trust in the system with figures like you, Sammy, and the new director of cricket, but the system failed again,” he said.

Bravo ended by offering encouragement to his brother and congratulating some of the new and returning members of the squad.

“To my brother, this too shall pass. Keep your head up, stay focused and trust in the Almighty. And, as always, I extend my best wishes to the team and selected players. It’s refreshing to see (Kjorn) Ottley, (Sherfane) Rutherford and (Shane) Dowrich back in the mix. Good luck guys,” he ended.

 

West Indies Senior Men’s white ball Head Coach Daren Sammy promises West Indian fans that great things are coming while encouraging them to come out and support the team as they host England in three ODIs and five T20Is in December.

Fans of the regional side have had a tough time of in in the last month, especially, having to watch the ongoing ICC Cricket World Cup which the West Indies failed to qualify for in June.

The West Indies followed up that disappointment with a 1-2 series loss to India from July 27-August 1.

“Being able to address you as the Head Coach of the West Indies Men’s white ball team is something I’ll always cherish,” Sammy wrote in a letter addressed to the public on Monday.

“Having experienced the joys of playing, I saw how we came together as one when I was your captain. I know and believe we can achieve greater things so I welcome you once again to be part of the Home Team as we face England in the upcoming series,” he continued.

From December 3rd -December 21st, the West Indies will take on England in three ODIs and five T20Is in Antigua, Barbados, Grenada and Trinidad & Tobago.

“It always feels great to see the West Indies flags flying, hearing our music and seeing the dancing in the stands as we celebrate what is truly a unique way of watching the game in this part of the world,” Sammy said.

He continued, “Every match; no matter where we play, no matter who we play against; has the ability to create history and a lasting legacy. I know the feeling: we saw it in 2012 in Sri Lanka and we witnessed it again in 2016 in India.”

Sammy concluded that he hopes to see the stands filled with maroon as his side hopes to begin the journey to the 2027 World Cup in South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe.

“I want to urge you to join your ‘Home’ team and rally round the West Indies when WI come home to face England in December. Let’s fill the stands with our pride and joy; let’s paint the town Maroon and have a blessed Christmas season on and off the field,” he said.

Less than 12 hours after exiting the World Cup, England named new-look squads for next month’s white-ball tour of the West Indies with an emphasis on rest, rotation and renewal.

The limited-overs trip to the Caribbean, coming straight off the back of a gruelling six-week trawl of India, had already been highlighted as a time to look at fresh faces but the ODI party contains only six survivors from the unimpressive title defence.

Captain Jos Buttler remains in charge and is joined by Gus Atkinson, Harry Brook, Brydon Carse, Sam Curran and Liam Livingstone.

Jonny Bairstow, Joe Root and Mark Wood have been rested ahead of January’s Test series in India and Test captain Ben Stokes is heading straight for an operation on his long-term knee injury.

But the omissions of Dawid Malan, Moeen Ali and Chris Woakes from the 50-over squad may prove to be more final.

Moeen and Woakes, together with Adil Rashid, are retained for the T20 leg, suggesting they still have a chance of next summer’s short-form World Cup, but Malan has been cut from both formats.

Despite being England’s top run-scorer over the last few weeks, finishing exactly 100 clear of his nearest challenger, at 36 he seems to have run out of road.

Three uncapped players make the cut in ODI side with Test vice-captain Ollie Pope joining seamers John Turner and Josh Tongue. The pace pair also feature in the 20-over squad.

Phil Salt, Will Jacks and Rehan Ahmed will also make the full trip, indicating they are all seen as important parts of England’s white-ball rebuild.

While Ahmed was handed a two-year central contract last month, it is notable that neither Jacks nor Salt were among the 29 names who did receive deals.

Malan, who appears to have played his final international, was signed up for a year.

ODI squad: J Buttler (c), R Ahmed, G Atkinson, H Brook, B Carse, Z Crawley, S Curran, B Duckett, T Hartley, W Jacks, L Livingstone, O Pope, P Salt, J Tongue, J Turner

T20I squad: J Buttler (c), R Ahmed, M Ali, G Atkinson, H Brook, S Curran, B Duckett, W Jacks, L Livingstone, T Mills, A Rashid, P Salt, J Tongue, R Topley, J Turner, C Woakes.

In a candid conversation with Sportskeeda, West Indies all-rounder Jason Holder expressed his concern about the state of cricket pitches in the Caribbean, asserting that the quality of training facilities plays a crucial role in the development of players.

Currently in India at the Rajasthan Royals High Performance Centre, Holder couldn't help but draw a stark comparison between the training grounds in the Caribbean and the state-of-the-art facilities provided by the Royals.

Holder joined the Rajasthan Royals (RR) ahead of the IPL 2023 season and provided a much-needed balance to the side.

The Rajasthan Royals have set a benchmark in cricketing infrastructure, offering their players a diverse range of eight different pitch variations along with cutting-edge facilities. This stark contrast hasn't gone unnoticed by Holder, who believes that such facilities are essential for honing skills to a higher standard.

"It's brilliant. Unfortunately, in the Caribbean, we don't have facilities that are equivalent to this. We just have normal grounds. There's no training ground," Holder remarked, highlighting the dearth of specialized training facilities in the Caribbean.

Holder emphasized the significance of having a variety of pitches and additional support staff, indicating that the Rajasthan Royals High Performance Centre provides a more comprehensive and tailored training experience compared to the grounds in the Caribbean. The West Indies cricketer is eager to make the most of this opportunity and extract maximum benefits from the top-notch facilities at his disposal.

"I just found it necessary to get away from the Caribbean, do something away from the Caribbean and do a lot more specific into what I need to work on," Holder explained, underscoring his decision to seek a more advanced and structured training environment.

Holder also praised the familial atmosphere fostered by the Rajasthan Royals, stating, "It is a really good family that the Royals have here, and they portray that family image." This sense of belonging and the conducive training environment have contributed to Holder's positive experience at the High Performance Centre.

The West Indies cricketer is utilizing his time in India to not only focus on physical fitness but also to refine his tactical skills. The opportunity to train in different conditions, coupled with the structured approach adopted by the Rajasthan Royals, has reignited Holder's passion for the game and provided him with a valuable platform for improvement.

As the West Indies all-rounder strives to enhance his cricketing prowess, his insights shed light on the challenges faced by players in the Caribbean and underscore the importance of investing in advanced training facilities for the development of cricket talent worldwide.

 

West Indies captain Hayley Matthews has been rewarded for her superb recent form by being crowned the ICC Women's Player of the Month award for October 2023.

Matthews held off determined challenges from Bangladesh spinner Nahida Akter and New Zealand all-rounder Amelia Kerr to claim the award, after a dominant period of play against Australia during the month.

The 25-year-old smashed scores of 99*, 132 and 79 in a Player of the Series performance during the T20I component of the West Indies' tour of Australia

Matthews also chipped in with an excellent spell of 3-36 during the second match of that three-game series to help the Caribbean side to a memorable victory.

The all-rounder then backed up those efforts with strong contributions during the ODI leg of the Australia tour, with scores of 20 and 23 during the two completed 50-over contests to cap off a huge month for the West Indies star.

Matthews remained Down Under following the series to compete in the domestic WBBL competition and was thrilled to accept her award from Australia.

“I’m very grateful to have received the ICC Women’s Player of the Month award for October," Matthews said.

"I love pulling on the West Indies jersey. Every time I do wear that maroon and gold, it definitely adds an extra layer where you can go out there and perform well, not only for yourself and for the team, but in knowing how much cricket means to the people of the Caribbean and how much it can bring people together.

“It was pretty special going out there in Australia and being able to perform the way that I did, but knowing how many people’s faces I was able to put a smile on back home in the Caribbean, that’s what means the most to me.”

 

Cricket West Indies (CWI) thanked Sunil Narine for his service to West Indies cricket during his international career. The talented spin bowler announced his retirement from international and regional List A cricket on Sunday, ahead of the final preliminary match for Trinidad & Tobago Red Force in the CG United Super50 Cup.

The 35-year-old made his debut for West Indies in India in 2011 and his last appearance was also against India in Guyana in 2019. He played in West Indies colours in 122 matches, which included 6 Tests, 65 appearances in One-Day International (ODI) and 51 in T20 International (T20I) cricket.

He was a member of the West Indies team which won the ICC Men’s T20 World Cup in 2012 when they beat Sri Lanka at the R Premadasa Stadium in Colombo. He played a crucial role with the ball in the victory, with three wickets as West Indies won by 36 runs. 

Narine represented the West Indies in all three formats. He played six Tests and took 21 wickets with best bowling figures of 6-91 against New Zealand in Hamilton. In 65 One-Day Internationals he took 92 wickets including a best of 6-27 vs South Africa in Guyana in 2016. He also took 52 wickets in 51 T20 Internationals, with best returns of 4-12 against New Zealand in Fort Lauderdale in 2012 to help secure the series victory.

CWI Director of Cricket, Miles Bascombe said: “On behalf of CWI I would like to thank Sunil Narine for his contribution to West Indies during his time on the international stage. He was the kind of bowler who excited fans and brought them to the game. He was the ‘X’ factor in the West Indies bowling attack and produced some amazing spells. When at his best he ranked among the very best in the modern era. We all remember the magical bowling performance in Sri Lanka, when he helped the West Indies to their first T20 World Cup title. As he continues his playing career, we wish him more success.”

Narine is in the Trinidad & Tobago Red Force squad for the first Semi-Final of the CG United 50 Cup to be played on Wednesday 8 November at the Brian Lara Cricket Academy and he may therefore make his final List A appearance on Saturday 11 November in the Final. The Semi-Finals and Final will be live on ESPN Caribbean.

 

The year 1996 was a great year for sports. The cricket World Cup, Olympics Games, European football championships and Chicago Bulls produced a then NBA basketball record, winning 72 games that season.

Seeing all those 1996 sports events set off my path from sports fan to professionally in sports journalism and public relations.

I mention this to highlight that it’s 100 per cent clear to me that the modern “West Indies selection” trivialities are unique in global sports. It’s no longer a case where one can use the clichés; it's simply a case of selectors' opinion and Caribbean people can’t expect them to pick West Indies teams that attain full agreement.

 It’s very possible for myself and many astute sports fans to watch all teams in the NBA, English Premier League, other international cricket teams or at a FIFA World Cup and get a clear idea of the best starting XI or five.

 These teams still elicit media and fan discussion over player selection. However, it never descends to the current Windies selection malaise since the rise of T20 cricket leagues in 2009, where chosen teams never gets 90-100 per cent support from all stakeholders.

 As noted on another publication - https://m.cricbuzz.com/cricket-news/127188/has-the-time-come-to-end-the-west-indies-experiment - observing CWI internally from 2019-2023 after previously in sports media from 2010-2019, fundamentally leads me to believe due to the modern dynamics of international cricket, unfortunately, despite who is in charge, the “Caribbean cricket” ecosystem cannot be fixed, whether the quasi-national “West Indies” construct is maintained or broken up voluntarily or by market forces.

 However, doing the simple global sports concept of “picking your best team” should not be hard for West Indies cricket to accomplish.

 

What are the best West Indies XIs?

 The reality is that selectors don’t objectively know and can’t currently select West Indies teams that will gain unanimous media and fan support. These suggested hypothetical XIs across might have been universally accepted if things were perfect but erudite West Indies observers know there is no chance of these teams ever taking the field.

 T20

 King, Hope, Pooran (wicketkeeper), Hetmyer, Powell (captain), Holder, Russell, Narine, Hosein, Joseph, McCoy

 Reserves: Rutherford, Allen, Shepherd, Drakes

 ODI

Lewis, Hope (captain/wicketkeeper), King, Pooran, Hetmyer, Mayers, Holder, Shepherd, Hosein, Joseph, McCoy

Reserves: Carty, Paul, Motie, Seales

TEST

K Braithwaite (Captain), T Chanderpaul, Bravo, Hope, Hetmyer, Pooran (wicketkeeper), Holder, Hosein, Joseph, Roach, Seales

 Reserves: King, Mayers, Cornwall, Gabriel, Da Silva

  

General selection problems:

 The role of “selectors” no longer works in the unique dynamics of the West Indies cricket multi-national construct. The former Ricky Skerritt administration's “selection review” task force implementation regrettably hasn’t been able to cure this problem.

 That review outside of the five Governance task force documents since 1992 was arguably the most consequential administrative document in recent CWI history.

 Caribbean cricket media and fans can attest to the complete trust breakdown in West Indies selection process since 2009 and why such a task force, that no cricket board globally had done before, was needed.

 Since 2009 West Indies have tried two “legends' Clive Lloyd & Desmond Haynes, a highly respected player, Roger Harper, and two players who didn’t succeed at the international level in Clyde Butts and Courtney Brown, for the polarizing role of chairman of selectors. None led to the improvement in West Indies results.

 Given the long-standing issue of insularity, currently having two selectors from Barbados in Desmond Haynes and Roland Butcher is unsustainable. Despite the gentleman’s potential good intentions - their presence is exasperating insularity feelings and bias in selection, whether real or perceived.

 Roger Harper lost his job after the West Indies were eliminated from the 2021 T20 World Cup group stage - however Desmond Haynes still remains despite selecting teams that failed to qualify for the 2022 T20 and ongoing 50 overs World Cups.

 A good example of this current case was when new white ball coach Darren Sammy, on appointment in May, saying he had in-depth conversations with Andre Russell, Sunil Narine, Evin Lewis and Shimron Hetmyer about playing for West Indies.

https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/wi-coach-daren-sammy-wants-to-get-andre-russell-suni-narine-shimron-hetmyer-back-1378679

 However, only Hetmyer has returned and selector Haynes said in his last public press conference in July, that Russell and Narine, who had just shown their quality in TKR’s run to CPL final, were not in his conversations.

 https://x.com/caribcricket/status/1686128090324320257?s=46

 This is basic deja’ vu. Many will recall a similar coach clash over players with selectors/administrators. During Phil Simmons’ first stint as coach he was comically suspended in 2015 for simply saying he wanted to select the best players.

 https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/phil-simmons-suspended-as-west-indies-coach-924039

 Also at domestic level there isn’t a clear alignment in picking teams for West Indies in mind, but rather for national interest to win the four-day and 50 over’s tournaments.

 To highlight two quotes from Daren Ganga who called out this issue in Trinidad & Tobago via a public Facebook post a few months ago:

 “Please focus on using retainer contracts to develop and reward younger cricketers and stop using for senior players who are underperforming and have non contention to play for West Indies.”

 “West Indies cricket is declining and our national selectors are directly contributing to the further demise of the game.”

 https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=pfbid02ZNSqZ9WLosMX5bunaKvdfcXHHBRo3JLSLwF6xeyS5cwwLgxMRab3K2EfPZsxGjz9l&id=100028246136315

 Copying the English system:

 Since the rise of T20s in 2009 and the decline in domestic standards since the PCL revamp in 2014, West Indies selectors have erred more on the side of conservative selections. They have never truly been innovative in picking players away from statistical performances in a poor domestic system or picking players for Test cricket based on international limited overs form like other nations have attempted.

 That factor has led to the current predicament of having only two all-format players, Jason Holder and Alzarri Joseph. The West Indies talent pool isn’t big enough to allow further continuing of this systematic selection faux pas.

 The English strategy of empowering the coach to be a selector with scouts around nations assisting should be implemented. Under Director of Cricket Rob Key in April 2021, the ECB made the role of selector redundant for 19 months, overseeing a period where the much-hyped “Bazball” Test cricket was implemented and England winning the 2022 T20 World Cup.

 Afterwards, despite success Luke Wright was appointed selector in November 2022,

https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/england-cricket-ed-smith-s-tenure-ends-as-national-selector-as-role-is-made-redundant-1260049

 https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/luke-wright-named-as-england-men-s-new-selector-1345988

 That approach seems perfect for the West Indies, where the coach would have sole selection authority like a football manager with support of the captain and Caribbean-wide scouting network support system. Then Desmond Haynes and any of the “legends” can be used in a more productive role, rather than the outdated and impossible West Indies context job of “selector”.

  

Colin Benjamin was a Cricket West Indies communications officer from 2019-2023. He has covered West Indies cricket for more than a decade for other global and Caribbean publications.

President of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana, His Excellency Dr. Mohamed Irfaan Ali, pledges support to Cricket West Indies (CWI) for the redevelopment of cricket in the Caribbean through infrastructural development, cricket programmes, and commercial opportunities.

On 13 October, 2023, President Ali and CWI President Dr. Kishore Shallow, met at State House in Guyana as part of the commitment to strengthen stakeholder relationships across the region. CWI Director of Cricket, Miles Bascombe; CWI Independent Director, Manniram Prashad; and Owner of Guyana Amazon Warriors, Dr. Ranjisinghi Bobby Ramroop were also in attendance.

The Head of State reiterated his commitment to establishing a partnership with CWI to improve the overall performance of West Indies cricket. One of the primary objectives will be establishing a High-Performance Centre in Guyana to service cricketers from across the region.

His Excellency said, “We are excited as a government to play our part with the Guyana Cricket Board (GCB) and Cricket West Indies (CWI) in the new re-development of cricket in the region. We welcome the partnership with CWI in the development of a regional High-Performance Centre and cricket academy here in Guyana."

He added his intention to work with the CWI President to advance the popularity and growth of the sport on multiple fronts in the Caribbean.

"We are also working with President Dr. Shallow and Cricket West Indies on advancing some innovative ideas in bringing more opportunities to our cricket players and spectators in the Region. I believe strongly that defining our product as distinct from other regions and countries is critical in the rebranding and repositioning CWI globally. Such a plan must incorporate the culture, people and natural beauty of our region."

President Ali underscored the importance of collaboration between parties with an interest in advancing the development of cricket at every level. He said, “I urge CWI to unify their efforts in rebuilding and strengthening our cricket in the interests of all stakeholders.”

Dr. Shallow lauded His Excellency for Guyana’s investments in cricket thus far and recognized the potential of collaborating with Guyana. He expressed, “President Ali’s commitment to cricket is evident with the major investments to stage the magnificent cricket festival, including the CPL finals in Guyana. His zeal for the success of West Indies cricket is unquestionable. This partnership with Guyana promises tremendous value for our young and emerging cricketers who will have access to world-class facilities and programs comparable to the best in the world. I emphasize that for West Indies teams to be iconic again, it is imperative that there is considerable collaboration between CWI and governments in our region.”

Guyana has successfully hosted the last two Caribbean Premier League (CPL) finals. Their cricket festival, culminating with CPL's final, is emerging to be a regional calendar event, having attracted thousands of visitors to Guyana.

Former West Indies cricket captain Dwayne Bravo is calling for the youth of Trinidad and Tobago to follow their dreams and stay away from a life of crime.

Bravo, who turned 40 on Saturday, took to Instagram this week to share his thoughts on the crime situation.

"To the youths out there, please find your passion and follow your dreams! Drugs and guns (are) not the way forward,” said Bravo.

The two-time T20 World Cup winner made the plea under an excerpt of his song "Sad Place".

At the end of September 2023, the twin island republic had recorded 454 murders for the year. Crime statistics on the police website show this is an increase from the 436 murders reported for the same period in 2022.

The West Indies Women got their tour of Australia off to a winning start with a four-wicket victory over a New South Wales (NSW) Women's team at Wilson Park.

Karishma Ramharack had the NSW ladies spun tightly in her web of off-spin and were restricted to posted 105-9 from their 20 overs. Ramharack finished with figures of 3-12. Captain Hayley Matthews supported with some wizardry of her own taking 2-7 from her two overs.

NSW skipper Sammy-Jo Johnson was the top-scorer with 28 with Hannah Darlington making 24.

Shemaine Campbelle led the West Indies Women's run-chase posting 33 from 34 deliveries which included five boundaries. Skipper Matthews was next best with 24 off 27. Aaliyah Alleyne 19 not out and Zaida James 15 not out took the visitors home to victory in 17.5 overs.

Head Coach Shane Deitz was pleased with the team's first outing since arriving in Australia four days ago.

“It's good to get the first win on tour. I think we've got a lot of areas we need to improve on, especially getting used to batting on these wickets with some extra pace and bounce. Overall, I think we played generally good all-round and it's going to put us in a good position to play on Sunday,” he said.

The ODI series against Australia is West Indies’ fourth fixture in the ICC Women’s Championship 2022-2025 after playing New Zealand, England and Ireland.

Each match provides West Indies with opportunity to win valuable points to climb the Championship table where they currently lie ninth of 10 teams.

Following the Australia Series, West Indies Women will play four three-match ODI series over the next two years. At the end of the cycle, the top five teams in the ICC Women’s Championship will book berths in the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup in 2025 along with hosts India.

The remaining teams will have to go through the ICC Women's Cricket World Cup Qualifier.

 

 

In June next year, the West Indies, along with the USA, will host their third senior men’s ICC tournament when the cricket world descends upon our region for the ninth edition of the ICC Men’s T20 World Cup.

The West Indies previously hosted the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup in 2007 as well as the second edition of the T20 World Cup two years later.

Last week, Antigua, Barbados, Dominica, Guyana, Saint Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad & Tobago were announced as the seven Caribbean countries that will host matches along with New York, Texas and Florida in the USA.

CEO of Cricket West Indies, Johnny Grave, described the confirmation of the region as hosts as a “big landmark” in a CWI interview last week and is looking forward to inviting the rest of the world to the Caribbean.

“It’s a big landmark for us at Cricket West Indies (CWI) and the ICC because, having this confirmation now that seven of our host countries have made successful bids to host matches means that a lot of the work and detailed planning that we need to do in order to make the most of this huge opportunity to host out third men’s ICC tournament in the West Indies, and this time in partnership with our friends at USA cricket, can start,” he said.

He also went into what are the next steps in preparing for next year’s festivities.

“The next big step is to get the match schedule agreed with the ICC. We’ve got the ten hist venues. The next stage is to work through the detailed match schedule. This is the first World Cup ever to have 20 teams so it’s a big tournament to organize and there’s a small window from early June to the 30th of June when the final will take place to get all the matches in. We’ve got group stages after the warm-up games. We’ve then got the super eights stage then semi-finals and final so, once that schedule is agreed, then it’s all systems go in terms of tickets being on sale around December to coincide with us welcoming England to the region,” Grave said.

“It’s really important that we get the match schedules announced so that we can invite the world to come to the Caribbean next year,” he added.

Grave also expressed gratitude to the various Governments who put forward successful bids to host matches.

“We’re enormously grateful for the continued support we get from the Governments of the West Indies,” he said.

“All of them that put forward bids have been successful in securing matches which is great news. We’re really looking forward to some of the improvements that those Governments have put forward in their proposals to us and the ICC in terms of ensuring that they are ready for what is the pinnacle of the men’s game currently. It’s a huge opportunity for the region to use the platform of hundreds of millions of fans watching our beautiful countries and our iconic venues and we want everyone in the world to come to the Caribbean and experience what we have to offer,” he added.

While encouraging people from all over the world to make the trip, Grave also urged local fans to come out and support the regional side in their bid for a third World T20 title.

“Absolutely. We’ve seen that unique kind of atmosphere when we hosted the 2018 Women’s World T20 with big crowds in St. Lucia and Antigua when the West Indies played and I’m sure when the West Indies play next June there’ll be big crowds at all the venues,” he said.

“We want every host country to show what a welcoming and exciting place this is to watch and play cricket and it’s really important that the fans come out in their masses. The school children will be invited as part of our community engagement program so that we can show what kind of an atmosphere it is to the world,” Grave added.

 

 

 

 

Jamaica's government has announced its reasons behind the decision not to bid for hosting rights in the upcoming 2024 ICC T20 World Cup, opting instead to invest JMD$100 million into the development of cricket in the country. The decision comes after a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis and consultations with stakeholders, according to a statement by Jamaica's Sports Minister, Olivia Grange.

The 2024 ICC T20 World Cup is set to be hosted by the United States and seven Caribbean countries, including St Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago, and Guyana, with the final slated to take place at the iconic Kensington Oval in Barbados. This prestigious cricketing event set to bowl off on June 4 and conclude on June 30, has generated significant interest and excitement among cricket enthusiasts across the region and the globe.

In a statement, Minister Grange explained the rationale behind the decision: "We had been considering the cost and source of funding of nearly half a billion dollars to host a few games in Jamaica. In our cost/benefit analysis with stakeholders, we also considered the economic, social, and development impact, including the potential tourism-related impact and attendant industry benefits using year-over-year economic modeling, reconciled against current tourism performance."

The decision to forego hosting rights was not taken lightly, as the prospect of hosting international cricket matches at renowned venues like Sabina Park in Kingston held immense allure. However, Minister Grange emphasized the need for responsible governance and sustainable development in the sporting arena. She stated, "I could not just follow my heart. As a responsible Minister, I am obliged to look beyond immediate gratification to sustainable sport development that will yield immeasurable rewards at all levels in Jamaica. I had to pay attention to the cost/benefit analysis, especially in a circumstance of limited resources."

Jamaica's commitment to cricket development remains unwavering. Minister Grange announced a significant investment of JMD$100 million in youth cricket and cricket in schools over the next five years. This initiative is in addition to the government's ambitious plan for the rehabilitation and development of Jamaica's sports infrastructure.

While the decision has garnered support for its long-term vision, it has also sparked consternation among stakeholders who view it as a missed opportunity for the country. Opposition leader Mark Golding lamented to the Jamaica Observer, "It is hard to accept that an international tournament of this stature is being played in the Caribbean, and not a single match is being held here at our iconic Sabina Park."

Dr. Donovan Bennett, a Cricket West Indies board director, expressed skepticism about the government's intentions, stating, "It's quite obvious that the Government had no intention of bidding because this thing has been going on for about 10 or 12 weeks."

Dr. Akshai Mansingh, the dean of the Faculty of Sport at The University of the West Indies, echoed the sentiment that Jamaica missed a unique opportunity, saying, "By not bidding, the Jamaican Government spurned the chance to not only boost the economy and the tourism sector but also to upgrade infrastructure."

 

Cricket West Indies (CWI) today confirmed the start times for the first ever Christmas Series played between West Indies and England in December 2023. The series will feature eight matches – three CG United One-Day Internationals (ODI) and five T20 Internationals (T20I) from 3 to 21 December as fans get the opportunity to rally at home and celebrate with the West Indies ahead of the Christmas holidays.

England arrive in Antigua to start the tour with two CG United ODIs at the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium on 3 and 6 December. The 1st CG United ODI is a day game starting at 9:30am with the 2nd CG United ODI starting at 1:30pm as a day/night game. The 3rd and final CG United ODI to be played at Kensington Oval, Barbados on 9 December will also be a day/night game starting at 1:30pm.

The five-match T20I starts in Barbados with the first match played at Kensington Oval under lights starting at 6pm. The Spice Isle of Grenada then welcomes both teams for the 2nd and 3rd T20Is on 14 and 16 December with both matches starting at 1:30pm.

The tour concludes in the week before Christmas with the 4th and 5th T20Is on December 19 and 21. The Brian Lara Cricket Academy in Trinidad will be hosting a West Indies vs England men’s fixture for the first time with day/night matches starting at 4pm.

Fans can purchase tickets in advance from the Windies Tickets service presented by Mastercard at Tickets.Windiescricket.com . Fans who purchase online and in advance can choose their preferred seats and benefit from a discount compared to tickets purchased at the venue box office. 

FULL MATCH SCHEDULE (with start times)

3 December: 1st CG United ODI at Sir Vivian Richards Stadium, Antigua – 9:30am

6 December: 2nd CG United ODI at Sir Vivian Richards Stadium, Antigua – 1:30pm

9 December: 3rd CG United at Kensington Oval, Barbados – 1:30pm

12 December: 1st T20I at Kensington Oval, Barbados – 6pm

14 December: 2nd T20I at Grenada National Stadium, Grenada – 1:30pm

16 December: 3rd T20I at Grenada National Stadium, Grenada – 1:30pm

19 December: 4th T20I at Brian Lara Cricket Academy, Trinidad – 4pm

21 December: 5th T20I at Brian Lara Cricket Academy, Trinidad – 4pm

 

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