Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe and Kelley O’Hara are to set play in their fourth World Cup after being named in the United States squad for this summer’s tournament in Australia and New Zealand.

The trio were included in a 23-player group by coach Vlatko Andonovski on Wednesday as the US bid to win the competition for a third time in a row.

There is further experience in the squad with Alyssa Naeher and Julie Ertz being involved for a third successive World Cup while a another four players – Crystal Dunn, Emily Sonnett, Lindsey Horan and Rose Lavelle – will feature for a second time.

Fourteen players will sample their first World Cup.

Forward Rapinoe, who has scored 63 goals in 199 appearances for the national side, is the oldest member of party. She turns 38 on July 5.

Captain Becky Sauerbrunn has been ruled out through injury.

Changes can still be made prior to the deadline for official squads to be submitted to organisers FIFA on July 10.

The US play Wales in San Jose, California on July 9 in their final friendly before the tournament.

The World Cup begins on July 20 with the holders facing Vietnam, the Netherlands and Portugal in the group stage.

Half centuries from Johnson Charles, Shai Hope, Roston Chase and Jason Holder crucially helped the West Indies to 297 in 49.3 overs, which was good enough for a 39-run win against the USA in their opening match of the ICC World Cup qualifier at the Takashinga Sports Club in Harare on Sunday.

Gajanand Singh scored an unbeaten 101, his first in One Day Internationals as the USA, needing 298 for victory, closed on 258-7.

Singh, whose ton came from 109 deliveries and Nosthush Kenjige, who scored a quick-fire 34 not out from 32 balls shared in an unbroken 76-run eighth-wicket partnership that for a while made things uncomfortable for the two-time world champions.

Shayan Jahangir contributed 39 and Aaron Jones 23, but the USA were unable to get on top the West Indies bowling. Kyle Mayers was the best of the bowlers with 2-30 while Alzarri Joseph took 2-68. Akeal Hosein went wicket-less but his contribution was no less crucial as his 10 overs only yielded 38 runs.

The USA justified Captain Patel’s decision to field first when Saurabh Netravalkar had Brandon King caught by Gajanand Singh at midwicket for a duck and Kyle Phillip bowled Kyle Mayers for two to have the West Indies in early trouble at 14-2.

However, Hope and Charles led the recovery with a 115-run third-wicket partnership but both soon fell to injudicious shots. The partnership was broken when Hope was dismissed for 54 off a fullish delivery floated up outside off by Nosthush Kenjige, the Barbadian batter playing an uncontrolled one-handed backhand shot toward Shayan Jahangir mere metres inside the wide cover boundary.

 Five balls later, Charles was on his way back to the hutch for 66 after he skewed a Steven Taylor delivery off a thick edge to Saurabh Netravalkar inside the ring at backward point as the West Indies slipped from 129-2 to 137-4.

Nicholas Pooran and Roston Chase set about another repair job with a 55-run partnership but with the score at 192, Pooran skied Taylor to Jahangir on the sweeper boundary to be out for 43. With his very next delivery Taylor had Rovman Powell caught Gajanand Singh inside the long off boundary.

At 192-6, the West Indies were in danger of being bowled out for under 250 runs but were spared those blushes courtesy a 74-run seventh-wicket partnership between Chase and Jason Holder, who took the score to 266 when Chase lost his wicket to Netravalkar for 55.

Kyle Phillip dismissed Holder for 56 and Alzarri Joseph for three two balls later as the West Indies closed on 297.

Phillip took 3-56 while Netravalkar and Taylor each took 3-53 in a solid effort against their supposedly superior opponents.

 

Defending champion Matt Fitzpatrick enjoyed another magical moment in the US Open as Rory McIlroy’s fast finish kept him firmly in contention to end his major drought.

Fitzpatrick recorded the third hole-in-one of the week on the 115-yard 15th at Los Angeles Country Club, his tee shot spinning back into the hole just as those of Matthieu Pavon and Sam Burns had done in round one.

However, Fitzpatrick could not see where the ball had landed and was walking off the tee before the roar from the crowd sparked enthusiastic, if somewhat belated, celebrations.

The eagle briefly lifted Fitzpatrick into red figures, but he eventually slipped back to where he started the day on one over to trail early clubhouse leader Wyndham Clark by 10 shots.

Clark carded four birdies and a solitary bogey as he added a 67 to his opening 64 to reach nine under par, a shot ahead of four-time major winner McIlroy.

McIlroy looked set for a frustrating day as he covered the back nine in 37, but then birdied the first, third, fifth, sixth, eighth and ninth to storm home in 30 – as far as it is possible to ‘storm’ in a round which took five hours, 39 minutes to complete.

McIlroy revealed he had been inspired to take a somewhat more cautious approach this week after watching the highlights of his 2014 Open victory at Royal Liverpool, which will host the year’s final major again next month.

“For whatever reason I went on to YouTube a few weeks ago and was looking back at Hoylake 2014 and I could not believe how many irons and three woods I was hitting off the tee and it set something off in my mind,” McIlroy said.

“You know how to do this, you know how to play smart. You don’t have to take driver – yes it’s a big weapon but I feel like I have more weapons in my arsenal than I did then so I may as well use them.”

Asked how much he wanted to win another major after a drought of almost nine years, McIlroy added: “I started thinking about winning this thing on Monday and no-one wants me to win another major more than I do.

“The desire is obviously there. I’ve been trying and I’ve come close over the past nine years and I keep coming back.

“I feel like I’ve showed a lot of resilience in my career, whether I get rewarded or punched in the gut I’ll always keep coming back.”

Dustin Johnson had recovered from a quadruple-bogey eight on the second to add a 70 to his opening 64 and remain six under par, a total matched by Australia’s Min Woo Lee thanks to a superb 65.

Overnight leaders Rickie Fowler and Xander Schauffele were among the later starters, Fowler starting brilliantly with three straight birdies to improve to 11 under.

Fowler and Schauffele had both shot 62 in the first round to record the lowest score in US Open history and equal the lowest in any men’s major, while the scoring average of 71.38 was another tournament record.

Tournament officials insisted they would not respond by making conditions “stupid hard”, although the par-three 11th was playing 297 yards and water had only been applied to “isolated spots on the greens for turf health”.

John Bodenhamer, chief championships officer of the USGA, told NBC: “[On Friday], as planned, we will play the golf course longer.

“We’re not going to force anything. We could do things that could make it stupid hard. We’re not going to do that.”

Defending champion Matt Fitzpatrick enjoyed another memorable moment in the US Open as he recorded the third hole-in-one of the week at Los Angeles Country Club.

Fitzpatrick’s tee shot on the 115-yard 15th pitched beyond the flag and span back into the hole, although he could not see where the ball had landed and was walking off the tee before the crowd’s roar sparked wild celebrations.

The eagle lifted Fitzpatrick from one over par to one under, eight shots behind the lead held by American Wyndham Clark, who had covered his first seven holes in three under to overhaul Rickie Fowler and Xander Schauffele.

Fowler and Schauffele had both shot 62 in the first round to record the lowest score in US Open history and equal the lowest in any men’s major, while the scoring average of 71.38 was another tournament record.

Tournament officials insisted they would not respond by making conditions “stupid hard”, although the par-three 11th was playing 297 yards on Friday and water had only been applied to “isolated spots on the putting greens for turf health”.

John Bodenhamer, chief championships officer of the USGA, told NBC: “[On Friday], as planned, we will play the golf course longer.

“We’re not going to force anything. We could do things that could make it stupid hard. We’re not going to do that.”

Dustin Johnson found the going hard enough on his own early on, the 2016 champion running up an eight on the second after tangling with a fairway bunker, thick rough and the barranca which runs down the left of the hole.

Rory McIlroy was also among the early starters and had dropped a shot on the 11th, but bounced back in style by holing a 32ft birdie putt on the 12th which had several feet of break from left to right.

McIlroy bogeyed the 13th after a pulled drive finished underneath the branches of a tree and failed to birdie the par-five 14th to remain four under.

The PANAM Hockey 5's World Cup Qualifiers concluded on Sunday, June 11, 2023 with Jamaica sealing a World Cup spot after defeating Paraguay in the 3rd place game, while the USA clinched the title with a penalty shootout win over Trinidad and Tobago.

With blazing speed and clinical finishing, the Jamaican team dominated Paraguay, securing an impressive 5-2 victory.

Nickoy Stephenson turned in a Man of the Match performance, scoring a hat-trick, while Shemar Gordon added a brace to secure a well-deserved win. The Jamaicans flew out of the blocks as Nickoy Stephenson opened the scoring in the 2nd minute, then doubled the lead with a 6th minute strike. The Paraguayans were stunned by the intensity and fast attacking play when Shemar Gordon added a third in the 8th minute for a 3-0 lead. However, the Paraguayans thought they got a lifeline when Vera Elias scored in the 10th minute but those hopes were quickly dashed as Stephenson completed his hat trick a minute later.

Despite going down to three men after a quick succession of cards, the Jamaicans were able to hold off the Paraguayans, led by a valiant display of tactical discipline backed up by truly astute goalkeeping from Goalkeeper of the Tournament and captain, Ajani Burton.

The Jamaicans were able to seal victory and put the game beyond doubt with a 19th minute goal from Shemar Gordon for a final score of 5-2.

This momentous accomplishment is a testament to the talent, dedication, and resilience of the Jamaican players, as echoed by Head Coach Duvaughn Henlon.

"We are very elated and ecstatic that we made it to the World Cup, and I’m very proud of the players who have been playing some very good hockey over the week. We are happy that we delivered for Jamaica but will turn our attention to preparing for the Central America and Caribbean Games, which start in the next two weeks, to try and achieve those goals."

Henlon went on to thank the coaching staff, management team, sponsors, family, and friends and called for additional support from corporate Jamaica.

Meanwhile, the final between United States against Trinidad and Tobago ended in a 2-2 draw. In the nerve-wracking shootout, the United States of America showcased nerves of steel, emerging triumphant with a 3-2 score line.

Trinidad & Tobago took a very early lead when Pierce Mickell scored in the 1st minute before the USA equalized eight minutes later through Sundeen Tyler. Marcano Teague then gave the Trinidadians another lead in the 15th minute before the USA equalized, once again, through Michael Barminski Jr in the 17th minute.

Cricket West Indies has rubbished reports about the International Cricket Council (ICC) possibly asking England to step in and hist next year’s ICC T20 World Cup, originally scheduled to take place in the West Indies and the USA.

A number of media outlets including CricTracker, Sportskeeda and the Daily Mirror have reported that the venue shift is being considered due to a lack of infrastructure in the USA but CEO of Cricket West Indies, Johnny Grave, denied these claims and questioned the source of the information.

“No!” was Grave’s answer when asked about the validity of the claims being reported.

“I don’t know where that’s coming from. I’m in London for the World Test Championship final and I’ll be here again for the ICC Annual General Meeting (AGM) in a few weeks’ time so who knows what the agenda is. There’s no truth to it,” Grave added.

The West Indies previously hosted the ICC T20 World Cup in 2010.

Texas’s Julien Alfred will have a chance to defend her NCAA Outdoor 100m title after securing her spot in the field on the final day of the NCAA West Regionals in Sacramento on Saturday.

The 21-year-old St. Lucian, who won the NCAA Indoor 60m and 200m double earlier this season, sped to a meet record and collegiate leading time of 10.83 to comfortably be the fastest qualifier to the Championships set for June 7-10 on her home track at the University of Texas's Mike A. Myers stadium.

Her Jamaican teammate, Kevona Davis, also made it through the preliminaries with an 11.06 effort.

The Texas duo also made it through in the 200m with Davis running a season’s best 22.33 and Alfred running 22.45.

Arkansas’s Ackera Nugent, a two-time NCAA Indoor Champion, ran 12.69, a new meet record to advance fastest in the sprint hurdles. Her countrywoman, Texas Tech’s Demisha Roswell, also made it through with a season’s best 12.77.

Arkansas’s Nickisha Price and Joanne Reid both advanced in the one-lap event with personal best times of 50.49 and 51.49, respectively.

In the field, defending NCAA high jump champion, Lamara Distin of Texas A&M, easily cleared 1.85m to secure her opportunity to defend her title. Texas’s Ackelia Smith, world leader in the long jump, also booked her spot in the field for the triple jump with 13.96m.

Meanwhile, at the East Regionals in Jacksonville, Ohio State’s Yanique Dayle and Kentucky’s Anthaya Charlton made it through in the 100m.

Dayle, the Jamaican Senior, produced a big personal best 11.05 while Charlton, the Bahamian Freshman, produced 11.08 (2.3 m/s) to advance.

Dayle also advanced in the 200m with a season’s best 22.58 while LSU’s Brianna Lyston also made it through with 22.92.

In the field, Georgia’s Vincentian Junior, Mikeisha Welcome, jumped 13.50m to make it through in the triple jump.

 

Jamaicans Sean Bailey, Ackeem Blake and the Dominican Republic’s Marileidy Paulino all achieved lifetime bests to come out on top in their respective events on day two of the 2023 USATF LA Grand Prix at the UCLA Drake Stadium in California on Saturday.

The 25-year-old Bailey, younger brother of Olympic and World Champion Veronica Campbell-Brown, produced a career-best 44.43 to chase down Grenadian Olympic and World Champion, Kirani James, who had about a five-meter lead over Bailey heading into the final 100m of the race.

James’s time in second was a season’s best 44.50 while Quincy Hall was third in 45.09.

Paulino, the Olympic and World Championship silver medallist, produced a new national record and world leading 48.98 to win ahead of Salwa Eid Nasser (50.27) and Lynna Irby Jackson (50.38).

Puerto Rican defending Olympic Champion Jasmine Camacho-Quinn ran a world leading 12.31 to win the 100m hurdles ahead of Americans Keni Harrison (12.35) and Tia Jones (12.50).

Trinidadian World Indoor 400m Champion and Commonwealth Games 200m Champion, Jereem Richards, ran a season’s best 20.08 for second in the 200m behind Terrance Laird (20.06). Elijah Morrow was third in 20.22.

Moving to the 100m, Ackeem Blake produced a big personal best 9.89 to get a win over Americans Cravont Charleston (9.91) and Christian Coleman (9.91).

American Morolake Akinosun capitalized on the absence of both Sha’Carri Richardson and Marie- Josee Ta Lou from the Women’s equivalent to win in 10.97 ahead of countrywoman Melissa Jefferson (11.07) and Jamaican Junior Alana Reid (11.08).

In the field, 2019 World Championships silver medallist, Danniel Thomas-Dodd, produced a new personal best and national record 19.77m for third in the Women’s shot put. The event was won by the USA’s Maggie Ewen in a personal best and world leading 20.45m ahead of her teammate, Chase Ealy (19.98m).

Two-time World Champion Anderson Peters, won the javelin in 83.16m ahead of Curtis Thompson (75.27m) and Caspers Williamson (75.02m)

 

Following Wednesday night's washout of the Group A matches in the final round of the Concacaf Women U20 Championships qualifiers, Jamaica will now play their opening match against Canada on May 26.

They will then play the USA on May 28 with their final group match against Panama set for May 30.

Adverse weather conditions resulted in water-logged fields in the Dominican Republic on Wednesday night causing the games to be postponed.

 

The other Group A fixture between the United States and Panama was also called off.

 

Jamaica's U-20 Reggae Girlz Head Coach, Hugh Bradford, is gearing up for what he believes will be one of the most challenging and demanding Concacaf Women's Under-20 Championships in the country's history. However, Bradford remains confident in the depth of his 20-player squad, which he expects to showcase their competitiveness and secure a historic spot at the FIFA Women's Under-20 World Cup next year.

In the first phase of qualifiers, the young Reggae Girlz displayed their prowess by defeating Anguilla 6-0, Bermuda 2-0, and Honduras by a similar scoreline, securing the top spot in their group. However, their upcoming matches in Group A will prove to be tougher, as they face the defending seven-time champions, the United States, along with another powerhouse, Canada, and Panama.

Their campaign kicks off against Canada on Wednesday at 3:00 pm, followed by a clash with the United States two days later at 5:00 pm, and concluding with a match against Panama on Sunday at 2:00 pm. Meanwhile, Group B will witness Mexico, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and the host nation Dominican Republic battling it out.

To strengthen the team's chances, Bradford made eight changes to the squad that excelled in the first phase of qualifying. These alterations indicate his determination to secure one of the three World Cup spots up for grabs.

"Our expectation is to qualify, but we are aware of the challenges that lie ahead due to the tough draw. Therefore, we are taking it one game at a time and aiming to perform at our best in each match," stated Bradford. He emphasized the importance of depth at this stage, noting that the young ladies, especially those who were part of the previous tournament in Nicaragua, have demonstrated their determination to fight for World Cup qualification.

Among the new additions to the squad are defender Amelia Van Zanten, sister of senior Reggae Girlz winger Kalyssa "Kiki" Van Zanten, and West Bromwich Albion's Una Moy Lue. Additionally, players such as Canada-born Taijah Fraser, as well as American-born athletes Kaitlyn Ennis, Anaiyah Robinson, Njeri Butts, and Njeri Lewis, have caught Bradford's attention.

Despite facing challenges in achieving team cohesion due to unavailability for a planned camp before departure, Bradford remains optimistic about his team's ability to overcome the stiff competition. He explained that while it's beneficial for players to get touches on the ball, the local league doesn't fully prepare them for the tournament's intensity. Consequently, Bradford incorporated new players into the squad to bring a fresh dynamic to their gameplay. He believes that with the right application, the team will compete strongly in the tournament, which promises to be both demanding and exciting.

Following the round-robin stage, the two best teams from each group will advance to the knockout stage. The finalists and the third-placed team will secure qualification for next year's World Cup.

Jamaica's highest placement in the Concacaf Women's Championship, during its 12 appearances, was a fourth-place finish in 2006. Jody Brown, a diminutive forward, holds the record for the country's all-time leading scorer in the tournament, with nine goals.

Squad: Andrene Smith, Shaneil Buckley, Una Moy Lue, Davia Richards, Liha Williams, Taijah Fraser, Tiny Seaton, Kaitlyn Ennis, Natoya Atkinson, Destiny Powell, Akeila Johnson, Janiel Mignott, Amelia Zanten, Liya Brooks, Avery Johnson, Maya Raghunandanan,

 

The Jamaica Football Federation has named a 20-player squad that will represent the country at the 2023 Concacaf Women’s U20 championship in the Dominican Republic from May 22 to June 3. The players are scheduled to depart for the championship on Saturday, May 20.

Jamaica will play in a tough Group A that also comprises the United States, Canada and Panama. Group B is made up of Mexico, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Dominican Republic.

After round-robin play, the two best teams from each group will advance to a knockout stage. All knockout stage matches with the two finalists and the third-place match winner qualifying for next year’s FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup.

The matches will be played across two venues - the Estadio Felix Sanchez in Santo Domingo and the Estadio Panamericano in San Cristobal.

The United States is the current champion (seventh title overall) of the CWU20 after defeating Mexico 2-0 in the 2022 Final.

The Jamaica squad is as follows: Andrene Smith, Shaneil Buckley, Una Moy Lue, Davia  Richards, Liha Williams, Taijah Fraser, Tiny Seaton, Kaitlyn Ennis, Natoya Atkinson, Destiny Powell, Akeila Johnson, Janiel Mignott, Amelia Zanten, Liya Brooks, Avery Johnson, Maya Raghunandanan, Anaiyah Robinson, Njeri  Butts, NjerI Lewis, Katie Oakley.

Minnesota’s Kion Benjamin ran a swift 10.18 to win the 100m title at the Big 10 Championships on Sunday in Bloomington, Indiana.

The 22-year-old Trinidadian secured first place ahead of Wisconsin’s Lawrence Johnson (10.22) and his Minnesota teammate and fellow Trinidadian, Carlon Hosten (10.22).

Jamaican Ohio State senior Yanique Dayle was third in the Women’s equivalent in 11.19. The event was taken by her teammate Leah Bertrand in 11.15 while Minnesota’s Amira Young ran 11.15 for second.

Dayle went two better in the 200m, running 22.87 to win ahead of Michigan’s Ziyah Holman (23.08) while 100m runner-up Young was third in 23.09.

Minnesota’s 19-year-old Trinidadian sophomore, Devin Augustine, ran 20.45 for third in the Men’s equivalent behind Iowa’s Austin Kresley (20.26) and 100m third-place finisher Carlon Hosten (20.43).

Jamaican Ohio State sophomore, Zidane Brown, ran 45.75 for second in the Men’s 400m behind Iowa’s Jenoah Mckiver (45.59). Michigan’s Dubem Amene ran 46.20 for third.

In the field, Nebraska’s Lotavia Brown took the Women’s triple jump in 13.33m ahead of Ohio State’s Jaimie Robinson (13.24m) and Michigan’s Riley Ammenhauser (13.07m)

Jamaican national junior record holder Alana Reid continued her sensational 2023 season with a dominant victory in the 100m at the 2023 Puma East Coast International Showcase in Maryland on Saturday.

In what was a highly anticipated contest, Hydel’s Reid, who ran 10.92 to set the national junior record en route to a gold medal at the ISSA Grace Kennedy Boys and Girls Championships in March, sped to a meet record 11.01 to comfortably take the 100m title.

The BVI’s Hodge, a 17-year-old Montverde Academy standout who won the Austin Sealy award at the 2022 Carifta Games in Kingston, was second in 11.16 and Friends’ Central’s Avery Lewis was third in 11.41.

Reid and Hodge were expected to clash at the recently concluded Carifta Games in Nassau before Hodge was forced to withdraw from the meet du to a rolled ankle in warm-ups ahead of her 100m heat. Reid ended up taking gold in 11.17.

Archbishop Carroll’s Nyckoles Harbor ran 10.28 to win the boys final just ahead of Catoctin High School’s Brody Buffington (10.29) while Motorcade Track Club’s Adrian Kerr was third in 10.40.

Excelsior’s Daniel Wright took victory in the Boys 110m hurdles in 13.87 ahead of DeMatha Catholic’s Anthony Waterman (13.91) and Our Lady of Sacred Heart’s Antonio Votour (14.41).

Holmwood Technical’s Kiara Meikle ran 13.36 for second in the Girls 100m hurdles behind Bullis School’s Myla Greene (13.28). Greene’s schoolmate Kennedy Flynn was third in 13.56.

Moving on to the one lap event, Meikle's teammate Rickiann Russell ran 52.24 for second in the girls 400m behind Hertage's Madison Whyte (52.49) while Hydel's Abigail Campbell ran 53.30 for third.

The boys equivalent saw Bullis School's freshman phenom Quincy Wilson run 46.11 for victory ahead of St. Elizabeth Technical's Jasauna Dennis (47.01) and James W. Robinson's Harry Economon (48.25).

STETHS and Excelsior ran 40.57 and 41.64, respectively, to finish first and second in the boys 4x100m relay.

Michelle Smith of Montverde Academy and the US Virgin Islands ran a meet record 58.34 to win the girls 400m hurdles ahead of Holmwood Technical's Annalice Brady (1:01.77) and St. Elizabeth Technical's Chennai Jarrett (1:03.97).

The boys equivalent was won by Edwin Allen's Tyrece Hyman in 53.58 ahead of DeMatha Catholic's Anthony Waterman (54.39) and St. Elizabeth Technical's Ronaldo Johnson (56.69).

Hydel's Danielle King took top spot in the girls 800m in 2:10.98 ahead of Holmwood's Jodyann Mitchell (2:11.92) and Bullis School's Lauren Leath (2:13.10). The boys equivalent was won by St. Elizabeth Technical's Barrain Smith in 1:53.79 ahead of DeMatha Catholic's Daden Grogan (1:55.65) and Mount St. Joseph School's Pierce Schulze (1:57.54). 

In the field, Holmwood Technical’s Cedricka Williams produced a dominant display to win the discus throw. Williams’ winning mark on 53.60m was more than 20m further than second placed Andrea Countiss of Gar-Field (33.10m). Bullis School’s Aleah Schwartz was third with 32.76m.

Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Hon. Olivia “Babsy” Grange, says Jamaica intends to throw their hat in the ring in hopes of being able to host matches at next year’s ICC T20 World Cup set to be held in the West Indies and the USA in June.

“In relation to the World Cup, we are interested. We are looking at the numbers and I’m in discussion with Billy Heaven, President of the Jamaica Cricket Association,” Grange told SportsMax.TV.

“A letter was written to the Prime Minister about it by Cricket West Indies and he has referred the matter to me. We’re looking at the numbers and having discussions. The bid is coming up shortly so we have to make a decision very soon but it is something we’d like to do,” the minister added.

For context, Jamaica has not hosted a Caribbean Premier League (CPL) match since 2019 and will, once again, not host any in the upcoming season. The country last hosted an international game in January 2022 when the West Indies hosted Ireland for three ODIs and three T20Is.

As it relates to 2023, “things didn’t quite come together for matches” according to CPL Head of PR and Communications Peter Miller.

“Talks are ongoing for 2024 and we are hopeful that we will have matches in Jamaica in the future.”

The main problem, as put by CPL CEO Pete Russell, has been “a lack of support from the Government and the private sector.”

“We have made no secret of the fact that we have lacked support in terms of bringing the CPL to Jamaica over the years and this has been a challenge,” Russell told the Jamaica Observer recently.

The CEO emphasized his point by drawing a comparison with Guyana, who will host the playoffs for this year’s tournament and have also submitted a proposal to host games at the World Cup.

“We feel that what CPL does for the host countries speaks for itself, with Guyana Government’s Cricket Carnival a prime example of what can be achieved if stakeholders work together. There was a 90% increase of international arrivals into Guyana in September 2022 with 31,050 international visitors arriving in the country. There were no hotel rooms available, and money was being put into the Guyanese economy,” he said.

“We want to be able to come back to Jamaica but, for this to happen, we need support from the Government and the private sector,” he added.

 

2022 Commonwealth 110m hurdles champion Rasheed Broadbell opened his 2023 outdoor season with a 13.12 effort to finish second in the preliminaries of the 110m hurdles at the Tom Jones Memorial Invitational at the Percy Beard Track in Gainesville on Saturday.

Broadbell, who opened his season last year with 13.31 in Kingston, was beaten by American World Champion Grant Holloway who produced a world leading 13.03 for victory. American Robert Dunning was third in 13.40.

Broadbell didn’t run in the final that was, once again, won by Holloway in 13.05 ahead of Dunning (13.23) and Brazilian Rafael Pereira (13.34).

Bahamian Commonwealth Games silver medallist Devynne Charlton opened her outdoor season with a 12.64 effort for third in the Women’s 100m hurdles. The race was won by American 2019 World Champion Nia Ali in 12.53 ahead of Nigerian Olympic Champion and World Record Holder Tobi Amusan (12.59).

Jamaican 2015 World Champion Danielle Williams was fourth in 12.74 while 2022 World Under-20 Champion Kerrica Hill was fifth in 12.86 in her first outing since going pro.

Jamaicans Rajay Hamilton and national indoor record holder Tarees Rhoden both produced personal bests to finish first and second, respectively, in the Men’s 800m.

Hamilton, 27, dipped below 1:46.00 for the first time in his career with 1:45.91 for victory.

Clemson’s Rhoden, who set a national indoor record 1:46.61 earlier this season at the ACC Indoor Championships, ran 1:46.20 for second while Kameron Jones, running unattached, was third in 1:46.47.

Hamilton’s personal best before this meet was 1:46.16 in June last year while Rhoden’s was 1:47.43 done in May 2022.

 

 

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