Olympic champions Steven Gardiner and Shaunae Miller-Uibo were the standout names as the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) has officially confirmed its 27-member team for the World Athletics Relays set for May 4 and 5 at the refurbished Thomas A. Robinson National Stadium.

The Bahamas is expected to compete in the Men’s and Women’s 4x100m Relays, the Men’s 4x400m Relay and the Mixed 4x400m Relay.

Newly crowned World Indoor 60m champion and record holder Devynne Charlton was named in a Women’s 4x100m Relay pool which also included Camille Rutherford, Printassia Johnson, Jamiah Nabbie, Shayann Demeritte, Nia Richards, Charisma Taylor and Pedrya Seymour.

The Men’s 4x100m Relay pool consists of Samson Colebrooke, Samalie Farrington, Ian Kerr, Carlos Brown, Deedro Clarke, Blake Bartlett, Jeremiah Adderley and Warren Fraser.

The Men’s 4x400m Relay team includes Gardiner, Alonzo Russell, Wendell Miller, Zion Shepard, Deedro Clarke, Zion Miller, Lhevinne Joseph and Shakeem Hall-Smith. Finally,

The Mixed 4x400m Relay team for The Bahamas will consist of Miller-Ubio, Anthonique Strachan, Lacarthea Cooper, Robynn Rolle-Curry, Steven Gardiner, Alonzo Russell, Wendell Miller and Zion Shepherd.

The Bahamas hosted the World Athletics Relays in 2014, 2015 and 2017.

Reigning Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner continues to demonstrate strength, resilience and dazzling form in his push towards the 2024 Paris Games, as he opened his outdoor season with a tidy 31.99s-clocking to win the men’s 300m at the Hurricane Invitational in Miami on Friday.

The Bahamian won ahead of Trinidad and Tobago’s Asa Guevara, who finished in 32.78s and Barbadian Jonathan Jones (33.02s).

Though some ways off his 31.52s personal best in the event, Gardiner, has signalled that he is much stronger and better on return from last year’s injury, and is no doubt looking forward to repeating his 400m at this summer’s Olympic Games.

Last month, the 28-year-old clocked a world-leading 31.78s to win the men’s 300m at the Carolina Invitational indoor meet at the University of South Carolina. That time was the second fastest ever indoors, trialing his own 31.56s done at the same venue in 2022.

Gardiner, who is also the 2019 World Championships 400m gold medallist, was on his way to another undefeated season last year, but pulled up with an injury in the semifinals at the World Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

While heartbroken by the injury at the time, Gardiner promised not to give up and his recent performances reaffirms his determination to defend his 400m title in Paris with a clean bill of health.

Reigning Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner made a successful return to the track at the South Carolina Invitational at the University of South Carolina on Friday.

The Bahamian produced a world-leading 31.78 to win the men’s 300m ahead of American Matthew Boling (32.58) and British World Championship silver medallist Matthew Hudson-Smith (33.82).

The 28-year-old's time was also the second fastest ever indoors, only trailing his 31.56 done at the same venue in 2022.

Gardiner, who also took gold at the World Championships in Doha in 2019, was on his way to another undefeated season in the 400m before pulling up with an injury in the semi-finals at the World Championships in Budapest last August.

In the women’s equivalent in South Carolina, Jamaican Charokee Young ran 37.38 for second behind American Quanera Hayes who won in an excellent 36.36. Tierra Robinson-Jones was third in 38.44.

Two-time Jamaican national 200m champion Andrew Hudson ran 6.74 to take top spot in the men’s 60m ahead of Miles Stephens (6.89) and Doniven Jackson (6.92).

In the field, Guyanese Limestone College senior Lloyd McCurdy jumped 14.50m to win the men’s triple jump ahead of Wingate’s Dequan Thompson (14.44m) and Limestone’s Trevon Jenkins (14.18m).

In recognition of his exceptional contributions to Bahamian sports history, Tokyo Olympic gold medalist Steven Gardiner was on Monday bestowed with The Golden Jubilee Independence Award of Supreme Honor by the Government of The Bahamas. The accolade celebrates Gardiner's remarkable achievements on the track, solidifying his legacy as a trailblazer for the nation.

The Special Golden Jubilee of Independence Award recognizes citizens for their outstanding contributions to The Bahamas in various spheres of human endeavor encompassing both the pre-Independence and post-Independence periods of Bahamian history.

Gardiner's triumph in the 400m event at the Tokyo Olympics not only secured his status as the 2021 Olympic champion but also etched his name in Bahamian sports history as the first Bahamian man to clinch Olympic gold in any sport. The 28-year-old sprinter, also the 2019 World Champion, has had a stellar career, boasting Olympic bronze and World Championship silver medals.

Known for his blazing speed, Gardiner holds the Bahamas national records for the 400m and 200m, clocking impressive times of 43.48 and 19.75, respectively. Indoors, he has demonstrated his prowess with a national best performance of 31.56 over 300m, setting an area best and world-best performance.

Despite setbacks caused by injuries that sidelined him during the 2022 and 2023 World Championships in Oregon and Budapest, Gardiner remains hopeful for a triumphant return at the 2024 Paris Olympics.

Expressing his gratitude for the prestigious award, Gardiner acknowledged the consistent support from God, family, friends, and supporters. In an Instagram post, he shared his anticipation for the upcoming track season and the opportunities to showcase his talent, stating, "I look forward to this upcoming track season and the opportunities to showcase my talent and make my country proud."

Gardiner's achievements add to The Bahamas' proud legacy in track and field, a legacy that includes notable figures like contemporary athletes Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Tonique Williams.

 

Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner is back to full health and is determined to defend his title in Paris, France next year.

In one of the more heartbreaking moments of the 2023 World Athletics Championships, the Bahamian star, who won the 400m title in Doha in 2019 and on the rebound from an injury that kept him out of the championships in Oregon in 2022, suffered an injury in his semi-final heat, tragically ending his campaign in Budapest.

Running out lane six in the last of three semi-finals, Gardiner was in complete control when he suddenly collapsed and fell to the track. He later revealed he had suffered a grade-one sprain of the tendon extending into the knee of the right posterior thigh.

His injury opened the door for Jamaica’s Antonio Watson, who advanced to the final with the fastest time of 44.13, to win Jamaica’s first gold medal in the event in 40 years.

However, in an interview with Bahamian media platform Eyewitness News, the soft-spoken Gardiner expressed confidence about his coming campaign to win a second Olympic gold medal.

“I’m back 100 per cent. Between my doctors in Germany and my coach in the US, we all are on one accord to take it slowly at the beginning of the season and then we’ll be ready for Paris 2024,” he said.

Gardiner revealed that there is only one objective for the coming season.

“The gold medal is the main goal. You know, to bring the medal home to Bahamas once more and also to defend the title that I conquered in 2021, so I just want to do it all again.”

There were mixed fortunes for the Caribbean men in the 400m semi-finals on day four of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Tuesday.

Antonio Watson was first up and set the track ablaze with a massive personal best 44.13 to take semi-final one over the likes of South African world record holder Wayde Van Niekerk and American Vernon Norwood.

Norwood ran a personal best of his own with 44.26 for second while Van Niekerk ran 44.65 in third and Jereem Richards ran 44.76 in fourth.

Van Niekerk made it through to the final as one of the fastest losers while Richards was just beaten out Norway’s Havard Bentdal Ingvaldsen who ran 44.70 in heat two.

Great Britain’s Matthew Hudson Smith won the second semi-final in a personal best, British and European record 44.26 ahead of 2011 World Champion Kirani James who ran 44.58.

Unfortunately, reigning Olympic Champion Steven Gardiner looked set to book his spot in the final before pulling up injured while leading with about 100m to go in the third semi-final.

The race was eventually won by American Quincy Hall in 44.43 while Jamaica’s Sean Bailey also made it through to the final with 44.94.

 

In what was a demonstration of Caribbean excellence and depth of talent Steven Gardiner, the 2019 world champion, 2011 champion Kirani James and Jamaicans Sean Bailey, Antonio Watson and Zandrian Barnes all advanced to the semi-final round of the 400m during Sunday’s opening session on day two of the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

Jereem Richards of Trinidad and Tobago and St Lucia’s Michael Joseph also advanced to the next round of competition.

Gardiner, who was unable to defend his title in Eugene, Oregon in 2022, due to injury, indicated that he was ready to claim his second world title, cruising to victory in the opening heat in 44.65. Japan’s Kentaro Sato was the runner-up in the heat in a national record of 44.77. Hungary’s Attila Molnar also set a national record of 44.84 to finish third.

Josephs of St Lucia was fifth in 45.04 and advanced as one of the next sixth fastest after the three automatic qualifiers from each heat.

Wayde van Neikerk, the world record holder, ran 44.57 to win Heat 2 in which Alonzo Russell of the Bahamas was sixth in 46.95. He failed to advance.

Richards, Trinidad and Tobago’s best hope of an individual medal at these championships, eased to a third-place finish in Heat 3 in 45.15 to automatically qualify for the next round. Norways’s Håvard Bentdal Ingvaldsen won the heat in a national record of 44.39 with the USA’s Vernon Norwood trailing in for second place in 44.87.

Grenada’s James, whose coach Harvey Glance died during his final weeks of preparation leading into these championships, won Heat 4 in 44.91. Japan’s Fuga Sato clocked a personal best of 44.97 to finish ahead of Bailey, who finished in 44.98.

Watson comfortably won Heat 5 in 44.77 ahead of the USA’s Quincy Hall, who clocked in at 44.86. Japan’s Yuki Joseph Nakajima was the next automatic qualifier from the heat when he finished third in 45.15.

Barnes was third in the final heat running 45.05 to automatically qualify. His heat was won by Bayapo Ndori of Botswana in 44.72 with Belgium’s Alexander Doom finishing in second place in a personal best 44.92.

You can watch live action from the 2023 World Athletics Championships by downloading the Sportsmax app from the Google Playstore.

 

The Gyulai Istvan Memorial in Hungary on Tuesday proved to be an excellent day for Caribbean athletes.

The star of the day, however, was reigning Olympic 400m champion, Steven Gardiner.

The Bahamian, unbeaten since 2017, produced a world-leading 43.74, the second-fastest time of his career, to win ahead of Jamaica’s Rusheen McDonald and American Vernon Norwood.

McDonald ran a massive season’s best 44.03 in second while Norwood’s time in third was 44.63.

In the women’s equivalent, Commonwealth champion Sada Williams ran a season’s best-equaling 50.34 to take the win ahead of Romania’s Andrea Miklos (50.80) and Austria’s Susanne Gogl-Walli (50.87). Charokee Young was sixth in 51.35.

Moving to the 100m where NCAA champion Julien Alfred, on her professional debut, got her usual good start and held her nerve to maintain her unbeaten record this season with a 10.89 effort. The former Texas star handed Sha’Carri Richardson (10.97) her first loss of the season while Tamari Davis was third with 11.02.

It was a Jamaican sweep in the men’s equivalent, with Yohan Blake producing his second consecutive good performance since a disappointing Jamaican Championships last week.

The 2011 World Champion ran 10.04 to win ahead of Ackeem Blake (10.09) while Rohan Watson, Jamaica’s national champion, was third in 10.10.

Defending World Champion and fastest woman alive in the 200m, Shericka Jackson, bounced back from a 100m defeat at the Silesia Diamond League on Sunday to run 22.03 to take the 200m ahead of Ireland’s Rhasidat Adeleke (22.36) and Bahamian Anthonique Strachan (22.45).

The men’s equivalent produced an upset as the Dominican Republic’s Alexander Ogando ran 19.99 to take the event ahead of American teenage sensation, Erriyon Knighton (20.05) and Jamaican national champion, Andrew Hudson, who ran 20.36 in third. Julian Forte was fourth in 20.41.

Reigning Olympic 110m hurdles champion, Hansle Parchment, was narrowly beaten by American Daniel Roberts in the men’s sprint hurdles.

Roberts’ winning time was 13.12, just .02 seconds faster than Parchment in second and Tyler Mason in third.

Andrenette Knight led a Jamaican 1-2-3-4 sweep in the women’s 400m hurdles.

Knight, who lost to Janieve Russell at the Jamaican National Championships last week, turned the tables this time around with a near flawless race to win in a new personal best 53.26.

Russell ran a season’s best 53.72 in second while Rushell Clayton, who will also be on Jamaica’s team in Budapest, ran a season’s best 53.79 for third. Shiann Salmon ensured that Jamaicans occupied the first four places with 55.04 in fourth.

In the field, 2019 World Champion and Jamaica’s national record holder, Tajay Gayle, finished second in the long jump.

Gayle’s best distance, 8.24m, had him in the lead until the final round when Greek Olympic Champion, Miltiadis Tentoglu, produced a winning jump of 8.29m. The USA’s Jarrion Lawson was third with 7.97m.

 

World champion athletes Steven Gardiner and Shericka Jackson are among Caribbean headliners set to compete at the Miramar Invitational at the Ansin Sports Complex on Saturday.

Gardiner, who is making a return after missing the 2022 World Championships in Oregon with an inflamed tendon, will run the 200m against a line-up that includes Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes and Botswana’s World U20 100m champion Letsile Tebogo.

The USA’s Kenny Bednarek will also compete in the half-lap sprint that is expected to be electric.

Meanwhile, Jackson, the reigning world 200m women’s champion, will take on a crack field in what will be her third 400m run for the season. She will line up against fellow Jamaicans, the Olympic finalist Stephenie-Ann McPherson, Janieve Russell and Charokee Young as well as American 400m hurdler Shamier Little and Aliya Adams.

World championships finalist Oblique Seville is among 22 sprinters listed for the 100m. The Jamaican prospect will take on compatriots Ackeem Blake, Andrew Hudson, Raheem Chambers, Oshane Bailey, and Michael Campbell for a lane in the finals.

Cejhae Green of Antigua and Barbuda, Ian Kerr of the Bahamas and Eric Harrison Jr of Trinidad and Tobago will also be aiming to make it into the finals. American veteran Mike Rodgers and current star Ronnie Baker will also be in contention.

Among the women, Briana Williams returns to her former training ground, hoping to make up for her poor performance over 200m at the recent Velocity Fest meet at the national stadium in Kingston. However, she will have her work cut out for her as she runs her first 100m this season.

A crack field has been assembled that includes the mercurial American Sha’Carri Richardson, compatriots Twanisha Terry, Teahna Daniels, Cambrea Sturgis, Melissa Jefferson and Javianne Oliver as well as Jamaicans Natasha Morrison, Jonielle Smith, Shockoria Wallace and Kashieka Cameron.

The 200m dash for women also promises to be intriguing with the likes of Caribbean stars World Championship 400m bronze medallist Sada Williams lining up against Anthonique Strachan of the Bahamas and Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte.

The race will also include the supremely talented Abby Steiner, Tamari Davis and Kyra Jefferson.

Machel Cedenio lines up in the 400m against Jamaica’s Rusheen McDonald and Alonzo Russell of the Bahamas. They will represent Caribbean pride as they do battle with the USA’s Michael Cherry and Great Britain’s Matthew Hudson-Smith.

Shafiqua Maloney of St Vincent and the Grenadines will take up the USA’s Ajee Wilson over 800m while Rajay Hamilton goes in the men’s equivalent against Puerto Rico’s Ryan Sanchez.

BVI’s Kyron McMaster will take on Marvin Williams of Jamaica and Andre Colebrook of the Bahamas over the 400m hurdles while Orlando Bennett, Damion Thomas of Jamaica and Shane Brathwaite of Barbados will challenge the might of American Daniel Roberts in the 110m hurdles.

Amoi Brown of Jamaica faces a tough field of Tonea Marshall, Anna Cockrell and Gabby Cunningham in the 100m hurdles that also features Haitian talent Mulern Jean.

In the field events, the long jump for both men and women should provide solid entertainment as 2019 World Champion Tajay Gayle, who has been gradually making a return from a long-term knee injury has been included in a field that also has LaQuan Nairn of the Bahamas and Andwuelle Wright of Trinidad and Tobago.

They will have their hands full facing Japan’s Shoutarou Shiroyama.

The women’s event promises to be an evenly matched affair as Jamaica’s Chanice Porter and Barbados’ Akela Jones will match skills against the USA’s Tiffany Flynn and Taliyah Brooks.

Danniel Thomas-Dodd and Lloydricia Cameron will be aiming for podium spots in the shot put as they take on the likes of Adelaide Aquilla and Khayla Dawson of the USA.

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

Rising star Adeajah Hodge and Olympic and World Champion Steven Gardiner emerged triumphant in their respective events at the two-day 2023 Florida Relays that concluded at the Percy Beard Track Field in Gainesville on Saturday.

With the CARIFTA Games just around the corner, 16-year-old Hodge, the defending U17 Girls sprint-double champion, showed that she will enter competition for the British Virgin Islands in good form after running away with the 100m dash.

On Friday, the Montverde Academy Junior clocked 11.26 to win with daylight between her and McKenzie Travis of Evangelical Christian who finished in 11.47. Travis had to fight hard to hold off a fast-finishing Cynteria James, who was third in 11.49.

Also, on Friday, the outstanding Bahamian Gardiner, who missed the 2022 World Championships with injury, signaled a return to good health and form, clocking a fast 20.14 to win the 200m by some distance over Trevor Bassitt (20.53) and Matthew Hudson Smith (20.56).

It was Gardiner’s fourth-fastest time over 200m.

Meanwhile, on Saturday, former Texas A&M standout Charokee Young, in her first season as a professional was the runner-up in the 400m Olympic development race beaten by Gabby Scott who clocked 51.24.

Young, who’s high school, Hydel won the Girls’ title at the 2023 ISSA GraceKennedy Boys and Girls Championships in her home country of Jamaica, was a close second in 51.31.

Stephanie Davis was third in 51.87.

Her compatriot, Jelani Walker was also a runner-up, this time in the 100m dash that was won by American teen sensation Erriyon Knighton, who clocked a slightly windy 9.98 for the victory.

Walker was on his shoulder clocking 10.01 while the talented Joseph Fahnbulleh was third in 10.04.

Jamaica’s Andrew Hudson was fourth in 10.05.

Bahamian 400m superstar Steven Gardiner ran a season’s best to win the 300m at the Radd Collegiate Last Chance meet in Gainesville on Thursday.

The 27-year-old ran 32.58, the fifth fastest time in the world this year, to win the event ahead of Jamaica’s Mario Heslop (33.67) and Fabian Hewitt (34.42). Gardiner holds the World Record for the event with a 31.56 clocking in January 2022.

Gardiner, who finished top of the podium at the 2019 World Championships and 2021 Olympics, opened his season with a 33.03 effort to win his section of the 300m at the South Carolina Invitational on February 3.

The 2017 World Championship silver medallist is working his way back from a heel injury that forced him out of action for seven months, meaning he was unable to defend his World title in Eugene in July.

His last race before the layoff was on the 24th of June at the Bahamas Championships in Nassau where he won in 45.22.

Elsewhere, Guyanese Olympian Aliyah Abrams won the women’s 400m in 52.09 ahead of Jessica Gbai (53.64) and Alexis Williams (55.39).

 

Injury has forced defending 400m champion out of the 2022 World Championships set to begin in Eugene, Oregon this coming weekend.

Defending 100m World Champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce continued her spectacular start to the 2022 season with a dominant win at Saturday’s Paris Diamond League.

Fraser-Pryce ran her second sub 10.7 clocking this season, equalling her own world-leading 10.67 for victory ahead of Great Britain’s Daryll Neita (10.99) and Ivory Coast’s Marie-Josee Ta Lou (11.01).

The eight-time Olympic and nine-time World Championship medallist previously ran 10.67 at the Kip Keino Classic in Nairobi, Kenya on May 7.

Bahamian Olympic 400m Champions Steven Gardiner and Shaunae Miller-Uibo both also showed good form to secure 400m victories.

Gardiner, who is also the defending World Champion, produced a typically easy display of running to win in a season’s best 44.21, ahead of the Dominican Republic’s Lidio Andres Feliz (44.92) and South Africa’s Zakhiti Nene (44.99).

Miller-Uibo, on the other hand, went out extremely hard in the first three quarters of her race before shutting down with about 50 metres to go, to win in 50.10 ahead of Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek (50.24) and Anna Kielbasinska (50.28).

Bahamian Devynne Charlton ran a season’s best 12.63 to finish second in the 100m hurdles behind Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan who did a personal best and African record 12.41 for victory. Great Britain’s Cindy Sember ran 12.73 for third.

Cuba’s Jordan Diaz Fortun (17.66m) and Andy Diaz (17.65) were the top two finishers in the triple jump ahead of Olympic Champion Pedro Pichardo of Portugal (17.49m).

 

Reigning Olympic champions Hansle Parchment and Elaine Thompson-Herah were among winners at Thursday’s Puerto Rico International Classic in Ponce.

Parchment sped to a season’s best mark 13.15 for victory in the Men’s 110m hurdles ahead of the USA's current world leader Devon Allen (13.20) and Jamal Britt (13.30).

The Women’s 100m hurdles was won by the USA’s Alaysha Johnson in 12.50 ahead of Puerto Rican Olympic champion Jasmine Camacho-Quinn (12.52) and Jamaican 2015 World champion Danielle Williams (12.67).

Double Olympic sprint champion Thompson-Herah cruised to victory in the Women’s 100m in 10.93 ahead of Trinidad & Tobago’s Michelle Lee-Ahye (11.06) and the USA’s Shania Collins (11.08).

Bahamian reigning Olympic and World 400m champion Steven Gardiner won the Men’s 300m in 31.52 ahead of the USA’s Vernon Norwood (31.81) and Jamaica’s Nathon Allen (32.04).

2011 World and 2012 Olympic 400m champion Kirani James of Grenada was victorious in the Men’s one-lap event in a season’s best 44.70 ahead of Jamaica’s Sean Bailey (45.42) and the USA’s Trevor Stewart (45.50).

Jamaica’s Junelle Bromfield was third in the Women’s equivalent in 51.82 behind Americans Gabby Scott (51.42) and Olympic 800m champion Athing Mu (50.42).

Moving to the 400m hurdles, Jamaica’s Janieve Russell ran a season’s best 54.09 to win ahead of teammates Shiann Salmon (54.43) and Rushell Clayton (54.90).

In the field, Jamal Wilson of the Bahamas was victorious in the Men’s high jump with 2.22m ahead of the USA’s Jeron Robinson (2.17m) and Puerto Rico’s Luis Castro Rivera (2.17m).

 

 

Puerto Rico’s defending Olympic champion in the Women’s 100m Hurdles Jasmine Camacho-Quinn stamped her class on the field with a world leading 12.67 into a -2.5 m/s headwind at the USATF Bermuda Games in Hamilton, Bermuda on Saturday.

Camacho-Quinn won ahead of the American pair of Chanel Brissett (13.06) and Christina Clemons (13.15).

Barbados’ Shane Brathwaite won the Men’s 110m Hurdles in 13.77 ahead of the USA’s Michael Dickson (13.85) and Brazil’s Eduardo Rodrigues (13.87).

Jamaica took the top three spots in the Women’s 400m Hurdles as former Hydel standout Shiann Salmon (55.35) got the better of 2019 World Championships bronze medalist Rushell Clayton (55.89) and multiple time World Championship and Olympic finalist Janieve Russell (56.56).

Bahamian Anthonique Strachan secured a win in the Women’s 200m in 23.23 ahead of the USA’s Dezerea Bryant (23.72) and Jamaica’s Briana Williams (23.82).

It was a Caribbean one-two in the Men’s 200m as Bahamian World and Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner got home in 20.80 ahead of Trinidad and Tobago’s World Indoor 400m champion Jereem Richards (20.86) and Liberia’s Emmanuel Matadi (21.04).

Reigning Olympic 100m bronze medalist Shericka Jackson of Jamaica ran 51.40 to win the Women’s 400m ahead of teammate Candice McLeod (51.57) and the USA’s Jade Stepter Baines (51.93).

Kirani James made his return to the track with a 45.63 clocking to win the Men’s 400m ahead of Great Britain’s Alex Haydock Wilson (46.05) and Jamaica’s Jaheel Hyde (46.27).

Jamaica’s Chrisann Gordon-Powell was second in the Women’s 800m in 2:04.19. The event was won by the USA’s Ajee Wilson in 2:03.09 while Charlene Lipsey, also of the USA, was third in 2:04.50.

In the field, Shanieka Ricketts won the Women’s Triple Jump in 14.15 ahead of Great Britain’s Naomi Metzger (14.00) and the USA’s Michelle Fokam 13.42).

Jamaica’s Jordan Scott jumped out to 16.37m for second in the Men’s Triple Jump behind American Olympian Chris Bernard (16.57). Bahamian Kaiwan Culmer jumped 15.82 for third.

Jamaicans Chanice Porter and Tissana Hickning were second and third in the Women’s Long Jump with 6.70 and 6.50, respectively. The USA’s Quanesha Burks won with 6.77.

 

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