Retired American track legend Allyson Felix, accompanied by her husband Kenneth, recently enjoyed a blissful vacation on the picturesque island of Jamaica. The couple, expecting their second child later this year, took time off to unwind and relish the beauty of the Caribbean paradise.

Felix, who bid farewell to her illustrious track career at the end of the 2022 season, has had a storied connection with Jamaica. The island served as the backdrop for some of her fiercest competitions against Jamaican rivals like Veronica Campbell Brown and Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce. The retired sprinter reminisced about her first encounter with Jamaica in 2002 when she competed as a junior at the World U20 Championships.

Sharing her Jamaican experience on Instagram, Felix expressed gratitude for the warm reception she received despite being a competitor. She reminisced about her 22-year journey, highlighting her medal-filled career that included an impressive tally of 22 gold medals at global championships, seven of which were Olympic and 14 World championships gold medals.

Felix, who shares a daughter named Camryn with Kenneth, posted a heartfelt message on Instagram, saying, "22 years ago, I went to Jamaica for the World Junior Championships and met my now-husband on that team. I also fell in love with the incredible people and the beautiful country. Even though they always cheered against me, I honestly feel so appreciated when I am here. It was only right for us to come back for our babymoon. Jamaica will forever hold a special place in my heart. Thank you for all of the love and hospitality, Jamaica."

The post garnered responses from fellow athletes, including Jamaican sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce, who welcomed Felix "home." In response, Felix conveyed her delight, stating, "@realshellyannfp definitely! Hahahah always good to be home."

Allyson Felix's Jamaican babymoon not only provided her with an opportunity to relish the island's beauty but also allowed her to reconnect with the memories of her impressive track career and the warm camaraderie she shares with her Jamaican competitors and her legion of fans on the island.

 

As news of her impending retirement continues to reverberate throughout the track and field community, two-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce continues to draw praise from some of the sport’s biggest stars.

The most recent to sing the Mommy Rocket’s praises were Olympic and World Champion Justin Gatlin and co-host Rodney Green on their Ready Set Go Podcast.

Since she won Olympic gold in Beijing in 2008, Fraser-Pryce has gone on to have one of the most dominating careers in track and field history. Her win in Beijing made her first Jamaican woman to win Olympic 100m gold. Her follow-up victory in 2012 made her only the third woman to win back-to-back Olympic titles joining other greats Wyoma Tyus and Gail Devers of the USA to accomplish the feat.

Winning the world 100 title in Berlin in 2009, saw her become the first woman to hold Olympic and World titles simultaneously, a feat she would accomplish twice after victories in London in 2012 and Moscow in 2013.

Feats such as these are why Green lamented her decision to hang up her spikes after what will be her fifth Olympic campaign in Paris this summer.

“Man, we ‘bout to lose a female juggernaut of our sport, man, a staple. I mean, I think in her country they should, I don't know if a statue would do or they should name a track or something, man. Man, we going to lose Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce this year, man, this is our last year around the world, you know, competing. What do you think about that?

(Jamaica unveiled a statue of Fraser-Pryce at Independence Park in Kingston in 2018.)

In response, Gatlin, the 2004 Olympic 100m champion and 2005 and 2017 World Champion, lauded the Jamaica superstar for her work on and off the track, stating, “Man, Shelly-Ann has been such an inspiration to the sport for so long. Watching her make her first Olympic team in 2008 and her dominance for so many years into the sport and watching her grow. She was out there in the world and watching her mature into the powerful, successful woman she is now, hat’s off to her. She deserves everything.”

Gatlin, who enjoyed a fierce rivalry against Fraser-Pryce’s contemporary, Usain Bolt, made reference to her fierce rivalry with compatriot Elaine Thompson-Herah and what it did to bring energy to the sport.

“We wish she could run many, many more years because she is the kind of person that rises to the occasion,” said Gatlin of the Jamaican who has only once failed to win a 100m medal in a global championship. That was in 2011 when she finished fourth in the 100m final in Daegu, South Korea.

Fraser-Pryce won 100m gold at the World Championships in 2007, 2009, 2013, 2019 and 2022. She was third at the most recent championships in Budapest, Hungary. She missed the 2017 championship because she was pregnant with her son Zyon.

“Watching her duke it out with Elaine (Thompson-Herah) throughout the years,” Gatlin continued, “they’d be seeing who would get to 10-7 first and then who would get to 10-6, and it made for pure entertainment because they both rose to the occasion.”

Green then chimed in clarifying that Fraser-Pryce not only battled with her Jamaican counterpart but also with the very best the USA had to offer.

“Elaine is just the recent one. She battled with many people that banged, like Carmelita Jeter. She went back and forth with Jet, man. She went back and forth with Veronica Campbell from her own country and the late great Tori (Bowie).”

 Gatlin then said, “She battled every elite female in this era.”

“Juggernauts, 10-6, 10-7 women through time, man,” Green remarked. “Like she has been amazing to our sport, she has been graceful to our sport. She has been nothing but a class act and I just think she will definitely be missed.

“I think as she makes her rounds this year, around the world, farewell tour, every country she goes, win or loss, when she runs, they should let her do a lap man, because this is the last time we’re going to get to see an amazing athlete grace track and field; the Mommy Rocket. It’s sad to see her go but I understand why she has to go.”

In a recently published interview with Essence Magazine, the 37-year-old Fraser-Pryce explained that her decision to retire after the Olympic Games in Paris stems from her wanting to dedicate more time to her family.

“There’s not a day I’m getting up to go practise and I’m like, ‘I’m over this’,” she said. “My son needs me. My husband and I have been together since before I won in 2008. He has sacrificed for me.

“We’re a partnership, a team. And it’s because of that support that I’m able to do the things that I have been doing for all these years. And I think I now owe it to them to do something else.”

 

Gatlin said he understood her decision.

"She said she owes it to her family to do something else now, especially her husband said she's been competing from 2008.She's been married for some time now for her husband and her child too. She owes it to them to just do something else and that's very honorable. Absolutely.

"I mean, when you when you are an athlete of her stature, your time is limited because your focus is on your own success, because that's what got you to where you're at, and you try to kind of juggle or balance family time, personal life around your successful career but everything, everything in your life is kind of floating around track, so now it's like with her son becoming older and having more time to be able to be a wife and a mom that's important.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Saturday, December 15, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce's Pocket Rocket Foundation brought the spirit of Christmas to Ewarton as they hosted a festive treat for an estimated 300 children at the Windalco Sports Complex. Fraser-Pryce's husband, Jason Pryce, hailing from the community, played a significant role in bringing this heartwarming event to his hometown.

Through the generous support of sponsors and the unwavering commitment of Fraser-Pryce, the children of Ewarton enjoyed a day filled with laughter, gifts, and exciting activities. This marks the third consecutive year that the Pocket Rocket Foundation has organized such an event in Ewarton, a testament to the foundation's dedication to spreading joy during the holiday season.

Fraser-Pryce, a decorated athlete and Olympic gold medalist, has not only excelled on the track but has also embraced the role of a benefactor to the community, particularly the children who eagerly anticipate the annual Christmas treat. With support from sponsors, including Digicel, the treat featured an array of delightful activities for the children, including rides on bounce-abouts, a rock climbing experience, and merry-go-rounds.

"We are very grateful for the support of our sponsors who have made this event possible. It's heartening to see the smiles on the children's faces as they enjoy the festivities," expressed Fraser-Pryce.

 

Sponsored in part by Digicel, the treat not only brought joy but also provided practical gifts for the children. NIKE contributed drawstring bags, socks, and pens, adding a touch of excitement to the holiday season. Digicel covered the costs of toys and rides, while Gracekennedy sponsored refreshments, ensuring the children had a memorable and enjoyable experience.

To make the occasion even more special, the foundation purchased 30 gallons of ice cream, adding a sweet touch to the festivities. Excelsior, a valued partner, distributed snack packs to all 300 children who gathered at the Windalco Sports Complex. This year, Windalco Sports Complex collaborated with the Pocket Rocket Foundation to create a safer and more conducive environment for the children.

Highlighting the sense of community and continuity, some past and present recipients of the foundation's support traveled to Ewarton to volunteer and share in the joyous occasion. Toyota Jamaica once again played a crucial role by providing transportation, ensuring that the children had a seamless and enjoyable experience.

As the sun set on a day filled with laughter, gifts, and shared moments, the Pocket Rocket Foundation, through Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce's vision, once again demonstrated the power of giving back and spreading the true spirit of Christmas in Ewarton.

Celebrating the outstanding achievements and enduring legacy of one of Jamaica's greatest athletes, Dr. The Honorable Mrs. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce OJ, a three-time Olympic gold medallist and a five-time 100m world champion, is set to receive The University of the West Indies (UWI) Alumni Exemplar Sports Award for 2023 on Friday night.

 This prestigious accolade is a testament to Fraser-Pryce's unparalleled athletic prowess, unwavering discipline, dedication, tenacity, and sportsmanship.

The award will be presented at the UWI Gala, marking the 75th Anniversary Celebration of the institution. The recognition underscores Fraser-Pryce's remarkable journey, from her days as an Honorary Graduate of the University of the West Indies, where she showcased brilliance both on and off the track.

In 2016, Fraser-Pryce received the Honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of the West Indies, Mona campus, a testament to her exceptional contributions to the world of athletics and beyond. The University of Technology also conferred upon her an Honorary Doctor of Laws, further solidifying her impact on the academic and athletic spheres. In 2012, she graduated from the University of Technology with a Bachelor's Degree in Child and Adolescent Development with honours.

 

Fraser-Pryce's illustrious career has been adorned with numerous awards and accolades, reflecting her excellence on the global stage. She clinched the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association's Golden Cleats Award for Female Athlete of the Year four times (2009, 2012, 2013, and 2015).

Additionally, she secured the RJR National Sportswoman of the Year award in 2012, 2013, 2015, 2019 and 2022.

 Her international recognition includes nominations for the Laureus World Sports Award for Sportswoman of the Year in 2010, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2019 and 2022. She finally won the prestigious award in 2023.

One of the defining moments of Fraser-Pryce's career came in 2013 when she achieved an unprecedented feat in track and field. She became the first woman in history to win the Triple World Sprint Championship, securing gold in the 100m, 200m, and 4x100m at the Championship in Moscow. This remarkable achievement earned her the title of IAAF Athlete of the Year.

Beyond her athletic prowess, Fraser-Pryce has been recognized for her contributions to society. In 2008, she was conferred with the Order of Distinction, Officer Class, by the Government of Jamaica. The same year, she received the Prime Minister’s Youth Award for excellence in Sports. In 2010, she was named the 1st UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador for Jamaica and the Grace Goodwill Ambassador for Peace. In September 2014, the Prime Minister of Jamaica bestowed upon her the title of Ambassador at Large for Jamaica.

As Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce accepts the UWI Alumni Exemplar Sports Award, the celebration not only honors her extraordinary athletic journey but also recognizes her indelible mark on the global stage as a symbol of Jamaican pride and excellence.

Elaine Thompson-Herah will not be training with athletes of the Elite Performance Track Club in Kingston but will instead train separately under the guidance of the club’s Coach Reynaldo Walcott.

Informed sources have indicated that the athlete will have separate training schedules with Walcott ‘going to’ Thompson-Herah in a private setting after he completes his duties with Elite Performance at the Ashenheim Stadium at Jamaica College each day. Walcott reportedly shared the news with the athletes in group on Thursday morning.

Prior to the recent developments, Thompson-Herah, who owns her own gym equipment, trained at the National Stadium at Kingston’s Independence Park.

Andi Sports Management, the agent representing Thompson-Herah, who won a historic 100/200m double at both the Rio 2016 and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, announced on Monday that the 31-year-old athlete will now take instruction from Walcott.

“Out of difficulties grow miracles. Happy Monday,” the sprinter posted on Instagram as if in celebration over the development.

The move represents a quick-turnaround from her much-publicized separation from Coach Shanikie Osbourne after both parties could not agree on terms of compensation for a long-term arrangement.

Osbourne had assumed coaching duties for the five-time Olympic gold medallist after the Jamaica National Athletics Championships in July and shepherded the injury-plagued sprinter to her best times of the now-concluded 2023 track season.

After Thompson-Herah finished fifth in the 100m final at the championships in a relatively pedestrian 11.06, Osbourne had got her running fast again clocking times of 11.00, 10.92, 10.84 and 10.79 in consecutive races to end her season on a high.

Following her split from Osbourne, Thompson-Herah’s husband, Derron, revealed in an interview on Sportsmax late last week that a new coaching appointment was not far off. The surprising announcement came on Monday morning.

The news of the choice of coach was a surprise given Thompson-Herah’s contentious relationship with five-time World 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, who has been coached by Walcott since early 2020. The relationship between the former good friends became increasingly strained while both were members of the MVP Track Club and was what eventually triggered Fraser-Pryce’s departure from the club to join what eventually became Elite Performance.

 

 

 

 Wary of the competition she's likely to face in her last Olympic Games in Paris next year, two-time Olympic 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is planning to participate in more races before heading to Europe for her final showdown.

 A knee injury and undisclosed physical challenges kept Fraser-Pryce from competing in many races leading up to the 2023 World Championships in Budapest in August, possibly contributing to her third-place finish in the 100m. As the only woman to medal in the 100m at four consecutive Olympic Games, she ran 10.77, a time insufficient to outpace the newly crowned World Champion ShaCarri Richardson of the United States, who finished in 10.65, breaking Fraser-Pryce's championship record of 10.67 set just a year earlier in Eugene, Oregon.

 Shericka Jackson, a gold medal favourite heading into Budapest, secured silver with a time of 10.72, 0.07s slower than her time at the Jamaica national championships in July.

 Recognizing the need to run faster in Paris, Fraser-Pryce understands that more races are essential in preparation for the ultimate showdown.

 "Yeah, for sure. Not only race sharpness but race confidence is something I definitely need. This year, I didn't have a choice not to race due to setbacks in my knee and other issues, and I didn't want to risk it," she shared with Sportsmax.TV. "So, I trusted my coach's judgment. Next year, once I'm healthy, I really want to start earlier and build that race momentum as I head into the Olympics."

 Fraser-Pryce believes that being healthy and competing in more races is crucial because the Olympics, as the pinnacle of sports, is where everyone brings their 'A' game.

 "The Olympics are so different. For some reason, athletes find a unique energy and motivation to come prepared. I want to ensure I give myself the best opportunity to represent myself."

"My sister, Shelly, won't let me give up on running," reveals Marie-Josee Ta Lou, the fastest woman in Africa, as she reflects on a remarkable season she describes as "great for me."

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, a three-time Olympic and 10-time world champion, serves as a constant source of motivation for Ta Lou. She reveals that the soon-to-be 37-year-old Jamaican icon is among the main reasons she plans to show up in Paris next year.

"She is constantly reminding me that she is older than me and she is still going strong. Her words are loud in my head every single day and she never gets exhausted of motivating me to wake every morning and do what I like,” the Ivorian speedster said. “Shelly-Ann is one of the many reasons you will see me in Paris for what could be my last Olympic Games."

While her love for the track spans a decade, Ta Lou acknowledges that her calling in athletics is greater than merely amassing medals.

Ta Lou, who achieved an African record time of 10.72 seconds during the 2022 Monaco Diamond League, making her the sixth-fastest woman of all time, has faced the heartache of coming agonizingly close to the podium at major championships. This season, she concluded the World Athletics Championships in Budapest with a fourth-place finish, a result that still stings.

"I wanted to get a medal but finished fourth. I have been in a situation where I have been crying alone in my room," Ta Lou reveals in an interview with the BBC. "The support I received from fans across the world and my fellow competitors has been my saving grace."

While Ta Lou is no stranger to narrowly missing out on top honors in athletics, she understands the profound impact she can have beyond the podium. She believes her calling extends to inspiring others to persevere and overcome the fear of failure.

"Sometimes I feel like my calling is different and way bigger than always being on the podium," she states. "It's about the hope I give to people to keep trying and about the legacy that I want to leave behind. I know there are people beyond athletics who see themselves through me in their daily struggles."

Ta Lou emphasizes that winning is not solely about crossing the finish line first but rather about the impact an athlete can have on people's lives. She aspires to be a beacon of the never-give-up spirit, encouraging others to pursue their dreams relentlessly.

Her journey has been marked by challenges, but Ta Lou maintains a positive outlook. She acknowledges the role of faith in her resilience, stating, "My strength comes from God," and sharing how quiet moments of meditation and prayer provide her with the vigor to persevere.

Despite moments of doubt and contemplating giving up, Ta Lou's motivation stems from the desire to make her mother proud, represent Africa, and inspire young girls on the continent to pursue their dreams. She sees herself as a source of light and hope for those facing complex challenges.

 

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s injury suffered during the second leg of the 4x100m relay on Saturday is not considered serious and the iconic Jamaican sprinter is said to be in good spirits.

Fraser-Pryce sustained a hamstring injury early on the second leg of the sprint relay but still managed to hand the baton off to third-leg runner Sashalee Forbes that enabled the Jamaicans to complete the relay and win a silver medal.

She was taken to hospital in Budapest where she underwent scans on the injured leg.

Overnight, there was concern about the severity of the injury to Fraser-Pryce who went into competition with an injured right knee that caused her to be well below her best in the 100m in which she ran a season-best 10.77 for a bronze medal.

However, the news on Sunday was encouraging as according to team doctor Dr Warren Blake, who spoke with the Jamaican Observer, the injury was not as bad as initially feared and that Fraser-Pryce, notwithstanding the circumstances, was in good spirits. Dr Blake revealed that her disappointment was with the fact that Jamaica did not win the gold medal.

Defending champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Shericka Jackson are through to the finals of the 100m. So, too, was Julien Alfred of St Lucia who continued her unbeaten run this season by taking her semi-final heat to advance to her first global final.

American medal hopeful Sha’Carri Richardson and the dangerous Marie Jose Ta-Lou are also through into what is expected to be a cracking final.

Fraser-Pryce who is going for her sixth world 100m title but whose preparation this season has been interrupted by a long-running knee injury, eased out of the blocks but rushed past the field to win her heat in 10.89.

The USA’s Tamari Davis secured her spot in the final by finishing second in 10.98.

Jackson, meanwhile, was more impressive getting a good start and cruised to victory in 10.79, just ahead of an impressive Ta Lou, who was just as easy finishing second on 10.79. Richardson, who was left in the blocks managed to take third in 10.84, a time that eventually got her into the final.

Alfred, who is unbeaten in the 100m this season, survived a scare in her heat after receiving a yellow card for a faulty start. However, having dodged a repeat of her fate at the 2022 World Championships, she started cautiously but stormed past the field to win in 10.92.

Britney Brown of the USA booked her finals berth after running 10.97 for a second-place finish.

Great Britain’s Dina Asher-Smith made it into the final having finished third in 11.01.

Defending champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Shericka Jackson and Julien Alfred all turned in impressive opening runs to advance to the semi-finals of the Women’s 100m dash at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Sunday.

American upstart Sha’Carri Richardson and the ever-improving Marie Josee Ta Lou of the Ivory Coast also demonstrated their immense talents setting up what is expected to be an intense semi-final round and an electrifying final on Monday.

Fraser-Pryce, who is going for a record-extending sixth world 100m title allayed fears about the impact of her injured knee, blasted out of the blocks but did not engage the after-burners as she cruised through the line in 11.01.

Swiss champion Mujinga Kambundji who has had her own issues with injury this season, came in second in 11.08. New Zealand’s fastest woman Zoe Hobbs advanced to the semis finishing third in 11.14.

 In similar fashion, Jackson the 2022 silver medalist, cruised to victory in Heat 4 in 11.06. Trinidad and Tobago’s veteran Michelle Lee Ahye took second place in a season’s best 11.16 with Germany’s Gina Lukenkemper third in 11.21.

Alfred, the NCAA champion, shook off her rust by winning her heat in 10.99 while holding off Great Britain’s Daryll Neita, who clocked 11.03 for second place. Gambia’s Gina Bass was third in 11.10.

Meanwhile, the USA’s gold medal hopeful ShaCarri Richardson cruised to an easy win in her heat stopping the clock in 10.92 with Jamaica’s Natasha Morrison 11.02 trailing in her wake. Italy’s Daynab Dosso ran a national record 11.14 to finish third and also advance to the semi-finals.

Ta Lou, who has run a lifetime best of 10.75 this season, let it known that she has no intention of being a bridesmaid at these championships, when she cruised to an easy time of 11.08 to win her heat ahead of Jamaica’s Sashalee Forbes, who clocked in at 11.12.

Buoyed by the cheers of her home crowd, Hungary’s Boglárka Takacs, finished third in 11.18.

Britanny Brown of the USA won her heat in 11.01 ahead of Great Britain's medal hopeful Dina Asher-Smith and Jaël Bestue of Spain who clocked 11.28.

Polish sprint star Ewa Swoboda also turned in an impressive performance storming to a 10.98 run to win her heat ahead of the USA’s Tamari Davis (11.06) and N'Ketia Seedo of the Netherlands, who clocked in at 11.11, a new personal best.

 

 

At the age of 36, with six World Championships behind her and 10 gold medals in her collection, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is preparing to venture into unknown territory at the World Athletics Championships Budapest 23.

“It’s a new situation for me to come back from injury and start my season so late,” the Jamaican sprint phenomenon confessed after contesting her first 100m race of the year, in Lucerne on 20 July.

Having won in Switzerland in 10.82 and in Madrid in 10.83 two days later, Fraser-Pryce heads to the Hungarian capital with an unbeaten record at 100m in 2023. Her only other races since overcoming a knee problem have been a 200m heat and final at the Jamaican Championships, where she finished second to Shericka Jackson, the world champion at the distance, in 22.26 – plus, of course, that celebrated victory in the mother’s race at her son’s school sports day.

Three women have gone faster: Jackson, with her scorching 10.65 at the Jamaican Championships, Sha’Carri Richardson with 10.71 in the heats at the US Championships and the bang in-form Ivorian Marie-Josee Ta Lou with 10.75 at the Bislett Games.

The Jamaican Supermom – who will be concentrating on the 100m, having withdrawn from the 200m – will need to close the gap on her rivals if she is to win the title for a sixth time and equal Sergey Bubka’s record haul of individual golds in one event.

In 14 years, Fraser-Pryce has only once failed to cross the line first in a World Championships 100m final, finishing fourth in Daegu in 2011.

In Oregon 12 months ago, she won in a championship record 10.67 – one of her record seven sub-10.70 performances in 2022 – with Jackson second in 10.73. This time Jackson has the super-fast time going into the championships, plus two 10.78 performances, but her only 100m wins have been on home ground in Jamaica. On the Diamond League circuit, the two-time world 400m bronze medallist has finished runner-up to Richardson in Doha and Silesia and third in Oslo and London.

In terms of head-to-heads, Fraser-Pryce boasts an 8-1 record against her compatriot and training partner and a 21-4 advantage over Ta Lou, but is tied at 3-3 with Richardson, her three successes against the US sprinter having come in their last three meetings.

At 34, Ta Lou is in the form of her life. A close second to the late Tori Bowie in London in 2017, losing the gold by 0.01, and third behind Fraser-Pryce and Dina Asher-Smith in Doha in 2019, the 5ft 3in African Pocket Rocket has blasted to 10 victories in 10 100m races in 2023, including Diamond League successes in Florence, Oslo, Lausanne and London, and looks a serious contender for a first global gold.

“I’m really going for the gold and I believe that I can do it,” Ta Lou said. “I know my finish is strong, but my start could be better. I need to improve it to make sure I can achieve my goal of winning gold.”

The 22-year-old Richardson, who will be making her major championship debut as a senior, has won eight of nine races at 100m this year, including Diamond League victories in Doha and Silesia. She has reached an impressive level of consistency, registering four of the fastest seven times in 2023, all 10.76 or quicker.

Her one defeat came in the Istvan Gyulai Memorial in Szekesfehervar on 18 July, when she clocked 10.97 as runner-up to the new kid on the blocks, Julien Alfred from St Lucia. The 22-year-old Commonwealth silver medallist prevailed in 10.89, stretching her unbeaten record to 10 wins.

Fifth fastest in the world at 100m with 10.83, Alfred has also clocked the third fastest 200m (21.91), suggesting she has the speed endurance to feature at the end of a close contest.

Brittany Brown and Tamari Davis, second and third behind Richardson at the US Championships, both have the potential to make the final and mount a challenge, while 2012 world U20 champion Anthonique Strachan of The Bahamas clocked 10.92 as runner up to Ta Lou in Oslo in June.

The European challenge will be led by Asher-Smith, who clocked an encouraging 10.85 as runner-up to Ta Lou in the London Diamond League, and Poland’s 2019 European indoor 60m champion Ewa Swoboda, who broke 11 seconds for the first time with 10.94 for third place in Silesia.

Newly minted men’s 100m champion Rohan Watson and defending world champions Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce and Shericka Jackson headline a powerful Jamaican team named Wednesday to represent the country at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

Watson, the surprise winner of the men’s 100m will campaign alongside Ryiem Forde and 2022 World Championship finalist Oblique Seville. Ackeem Blake who just missed out on the top three spots in the 100m has been listed as an alternate but he will be a member of the 4x100m squad that will also include Tyquendo Tracey and Michael Campbell.

Fraser-Pryce will be going for her sixth world title with Shericka Jackson, the reigning national champion in both 100m and 200m, campaigning alongside her. Also down to contest the 100m is Sashalee Forbes and Natasha Morrison.

Briana Williams and Elaine Thompson-Herah have been selected as members of the 4x100m relay team.

Andrew Hudson and Rasheed Dwyer will contest the men’s 200m while Jackson, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Natalliah Whyte and Kevona Davis will take on the 200m. Sashalee Forbes has been named as an alternate for the 200m, presumably on the likelihood that Fraser-Pryce will not go in the half-lap sprint.

The Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) put to rest the likelihood of Rusheen McDonald, who is the fastest Jamaican in the world this year over 400m, contesting the one-lap sprint. McDonald, who has run 44.03 this year, the third fastest time ever run over 400m by a Jamaican man, failed to show up for the semi-finals of the national championships.

Zandrian Barnes has been given the nod, who failed to finish in the top three at the national championships in early July, but has met the qualifying entry standard of 45.00. He will contest the 400m along with national champion Sean Bailey and runner-up Antonio Watson.

Jevaughn Powell, Malik James-King and Demish Gaye will make up the 4x400m relay squad.

Nickisha Price, Candice McLeod and Charokee Young will compete in the 400m for women with Joanne Reid named as an alternate. Janieve Russell, Rhonda Whyte and Shian Salmon will make up the 4x400m relay squad.

Reid, meanwhile, will contest the 4x400m Mixed Relay along with Stacy-Ann Williams, Rusheen McDonald and D’Andre Anderson.

Navasky Anderson, who dramatically met the entry standard of 1:44.70 on the final day for qualification on Sunday, is only male 800m runner named on the team while Natoya Goule and Adelle Tracey will take on the women’s event. Tracey will also compete in the 1500m.

An area of great strength for Jamaica is the sprint hurdles. World leader Rasheed Broadbell, the 2022 Commonwealth Games champion, will lead Jamaica’s hunt for medals along with Olympic champion Hansle Parchment and the fast-rising Orlando Bennett. Tyler Mason has been named as an alternate.

 Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper will lead the charge for the Jamaican women in the 100m hurdles alongside NCAA champion Ackera Nugent, who is making her debut on the senior team, and 2015 World Champion Danielle Williams, who is also the 2019 bronze medallist.

Amoi Brown is selected as the alternate.

Newly crowned senior national champion and World U20 record holder Roshawn Clarke will take on the world’s best in the 400m hurdles along with Jaheel Hyde and Assinie Wilson while Russell, Andrenette Knight and Rushell Clayton, the 2019 bronze medallist, will go in the women’s race.

Salmon is the alternate.

Romaine Beckford is to represent the black, gold and green in the high jump for men with Lamara Distin and Kimberly Williamson set to take on the women’s event.

The impressive teenager Jaydon Hibbert, the world leader in the triple jump, will try to add world title to his World U20, Carifta, NCAA Indoor and Outdoor titles. Two-time World championship silver medalist Shanieka Ricketts will go for a third medal in the women’s event and will be accompanied by NCAA silver medallist Ackelia Smith and Kimberly Williams.

Jamaica’s strength in the field events is further bolstered by the selection of Carey McLeod, Wayne Pinnock and the 2019 World Champion Tajay Gayle for the long jump while Tissana Hickling and Smith will contest the event among the women.

Newly crowned national record holder Rajindra Campbell and Danniel Thomas-Dodd will throw the shot put in their respective events.

Fedrick Dacres, the 2019 silver medalist, national champion Traves Smith and NCAA silver medallist will throw the discus in Budapest with Samantha Hall set to take on the women’s event. Last but certainly not least is the impressive Nyoka Clunis who will throw the hammer at the prestigious event where the world’s best athletes will congregate on August 19, 2023.

 

Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce, a name synonymous with excellence in track and field, continues to defy expectations and push the boundaries of what is possible in the sport. With an awe-inspiring record of five 100m world championships and two Olympic 100m gold medals, one might wonder what keeps her coming back to compete.

She answered that question on Thursday with a post on social media saying, “I think I’ve reached a point where I have nothing to prove to anyone but, at the same time, I think I have a lot to prove to myself.

“There’s a difference when you believe something and you know what you’re capable of or what’s within your reach. You want to make sure that you’re pushing yourself towards it and trying to accomplish it. I think that was me last year, where I just totally forgot about anybody else’s expectation and just focused on what I know I can do.”

The post reiterated sentiments expressed in a recent interview with Athletic Weekly, where she revealed her burning desire to run faster as the driving force behind her relentless pursuit of greatness. She states, "I used to refrain from stating clearly what I want, and I believe I can run faster – that’s really what has kept me here. I believe that with every fibre of my being."

Last year's consistent runs of seven 10.6 seconds showcased her immense potential, but Fraser Pryce firmly believes there is more to achieve. The prospect of dropping her time further propels her forward, as she remains steadfast in her pursuit of perfection.

What truly sets Fraser Pryce apart is her insatiable hunger for something new, something undiscovered. Despite her remarkable accomplishments, she remains excited and enthusiastic about her journey. The Jamaican sprint queen admits, "I wake up every morning and I go to practice and I’m like, 'man, I’m still doing this.' I still feel good, I still feel hungry."

As her career progresses, Fraser Pryce now views her role as an opportunity to inspire and impact the younger generation of athletes. She sees herself as a living example of what can be achieved with unwavering conviction and dedication. "It’s about impact, showing other athletes what you can do if you really have that conviction," she passionately states.

At 36 years old, Fraser Pryce understands that age should not limit her aspirations. She challenges the notion of ageism in sports, expressing frustration that other athletes in different disciplines can continue, while track and field athletes often face premature retirement. As long as she remains healthy, she vows to keep showing up, rewriting the record books along the way.

Fraser Pryce's dedication to her craft is unparalleled, and she is mindful of how she spends her time. Despite being a devoted mother, she prioritizes her training and even delegates cheering duties to her son's father during football matches. She knows that every second counts in her pursuit of greatness.

Surprisingly, after so many years at the pinnacle of the sport, Fraser Pryce remains humble and self-aware, acknowledging that she still has room for improvement.

 “I don’t have the best technique. I really have to work hard to cement it. It’s something that I have to go to the line and actively process in my head to say ‘this is what we’re doing, this is what we’re doing Shelly’ so I’m still learning to do that,” she states.

“I think one of the things is learning to do it being relaxed, as well as making sure that it’s automatic, it’s something that I can switch on and switch off if I need to. A lot of that takes concentration and replicating it daily in practice. It must be consistent and I think the more times I’m able to do it is, the easier it will become.”

 As the highly anticipated 2023 World Athletics Championships draw near, all eyes are on the legendary sprinter Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce.

With an incredible record of five 100m world titles under her belt, Fraser-Pryce's quest for a sixth crown has been the talk of the athletics world. However, recent knee injury concerns have raised doubts about her chances of defending her title.

In May, Fraser-Pryce suffered a knee injury during her training stint in Kenya. Despite the setback, the determined athlete refused to be deterred. Last week, she showcased her resilience by running times of 10.82 seconds in Lucerne last Thursday and 10.83 seconds in Madrid three days later. However, the question lingers – has her injury jeopardized her chances of clinching another gold?

As the competition heats up, Fraser-Pryce faces fierce opponents, each vying for the coveted top spot on the podium. Gold medal contenders such as Shericka Jackson (10.65), Sha’Carri Richardson (10.71), and Marie Josee Ta Lou (10.75) have all posted impressive times this season, times that Fraser-Pryce has yet to achieve this season.

Fraser-Pryce's comments after her race in Madrid on Sunday have fueled concerns about her fitness level. When asked about her recovery, she candidly admitted, "If I'm being truthful, then it's no, it's not 100 per cent, but you know it is what it is." Despite the uncertainty surrounding her injury, the Jamaican sprint queen remains focused on the task at hand.

Acknowledging the formidable competition she faces, Fraser-Pryce recognizes that other athletes are in peak form. However, she remains undaunted, mentally preparing herself to give her all on the starting line. "There are so many other athletes that I think I are dealing with different things," she stated, emphasizing her determination to perform at her best.

For Fraser-Pryce, the key lies in focusing on what she can control. While her injury recovery may not be at full strength, she refuses to let it define her performance. "I just focus on what I can do and maximizing on those things," she asserted.

As fans and fellow athletes eagerly await the World Championships, the burning question remains – will Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce's indomitable spirit and sheer talent be enough to secure a historic sixth 100m world title? Only time will tell as the world's fastest women take to the track, each one vying for glory and immortality in the sport of athletics.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce got her 100m season to a blazing start with a dominating victory at the Top Athletics Lucerne meeting in Switzerland on Thursday.

Having missed out on her first 100m race in Botswana and Kenya earlier in the season, the five-time world champion, ran her first competitive races over 200m at the Jamaican national championships in early July.

However, with those races out of the way, the Pocket Rocket lined up for her first blue-ribbon dash of the season and she did not disappoint. After recovering from a poor start, Fraser-Pryce tore through the field to win a new meet record of 10.82.

She was well clear of New Zealand’s Zoe Hobbs, who took the runner-up spot in 11.08 with the USA’s Kennedy Blackmon close behind in 11.11.

The Men’s A final was also a Jamaica affair with Julian Forte breaking 10 seconds for the first time this season while edging newly minted Jamaican champion Rohan Watson.

Forte took the lead early and held on to win in 9.99 over the fast-finishing Watson, who clocked in at 10.03 for second place. The USA’s Brandon Carnes was third in 10.06.

The 110m hurdles featured another thrilling battle between the Jamaican duo of Tyler Mason and Orlando Bennett. On the final day of the Jamaican national championships earlier this month, Bennett nipped Mason at the line to deny the former Jamaica College standout of a place on Jamaica’s team to the World Athletics Championships in Budapest.

On that Sunday, Bennett finished third in 13.19 to Mason who was fourth in 13.22. On Thursday, Mason turned the tables on his compatriot winning a hard-fought race in 13.19 with Bennett finishing second in 13.22.

Eric Edwards of the USA was a close third in 13.24.

Jamaican champion, Janieve Russell ran a new season’s best and meet record of 53.65 to record a comfortable victory in the 400m hurdles over Dalilah Mohammed of the USA who clocked in at 54.01 just ahead of Andrenette Knight, who finished in 54.13.

On Sunday, Rusheen McDonald ran the third-fastest time ever run by a Jamaican when he raced to a season-best 44.03 to finish behind Bahamian Steven Gardiner’s who ran a world-leading 43.74.

On Thursday, he proved it was no fluke as he stormed to a commanding victory in 44.80. He was metres clear of Botswana’s Collen Kebinatshipi who ran 45.15 for second place. Germany’s Manuel Sanders was third in 45.28.

 

 

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