Eoin Morgan says the timing is not right for him to take over as England's limited-overs coach if Matthew Mott departs.

Speculation has suggested Mott could leave his role following England's failure to defend their T20 World Cup crown in the United States and West Indies last month, losing to India in the semi-finals.

Morgan captained the side to glory at 2019's 50-over World Cup and retired from international cricket in 2022, having been credited with transforming England's white-ball culture.

The 37-year-old, who played 225 ODIs and 102 T20Is for England, has been tipped to coach his country in the future, but he is not tempted by the role at this moment.

"I've been asked a lot over the last couple of months about the role and whether I would take it on," he told Sky Sports.

"My answer has simply been, the timing for everything in my life at the moment is not right.

"Yes, I want to coach down the line, but I've got a young family and I spend a lot more time at home.

"I'm loving what I'm doing, watching cricket through this [punditry work].

"This news is news to me. It's not nice when a coach comes under fire and there is a lot of speculation about his future. Only time will tell what will happen."

England's T20 World Cup campaign followed a miserable defence of their ODI crown in India last year, where they lost six of their nine games and crashed out in the group stage.

In a dominant display, Sri Lanka Women's cricket team crushed the West Indies Women by 160 runs in the third ODI in Hambantota on Friday, securing a comprehensive 3-0 series sweep. Sri Lanka's innings, led by half-centuries from Chamari Athapaththu, Nilakshika Silva, and Anushka Sanjeewani, set an imposing target of 275 for 6, before Sachini Nisansala's maiden five-wicket haul dismantled the West Indies, who were bowled out for a meager 115.

After being put into bat, Sri Lanka started strongly with an opening partnership of 93 runs between Athapaththu and Vishmi Gunaratne. Gunaratne fell just six runs short of her half-century, miscuing a lofted shot to Aaliyah Alleyne at mid-off. Despite losing two more quick wickets, Sri Lanka's captain Athapaththu steadied the innings with a vital 57-run partnership with Nilakshika Silva.

Athapaththu's innings came to an end at 91 off 106 balls when Afy Fletcher spun one through her bat and pad, leaving Sri Lanka at 156 for 4. However, any hopes West Indies had of restricting the hosts were dashed by Silva and Sanjeewani. The duo added 117 runs for the fifth wicket, propelling Sri Lanka to a formidable total. Silva scored 63 off 78 balls, while Sanjeewani contributed a quick-fire 55 off 46 balls. The pair's efforts saw Sri Lanka plunder 93 runs in the final 10 overs, ensuring a challenging target for the visitors.

In response, the West Indies struggled from the outset, losing both Rashada Williams and skipper Shemaine Campbell within the first six overs. The only resistance came from Chedean Nation and Stafanie Taylor, who put together a 57-run partnership off 82 deliveries. However, Taylor's dismissal, edging behind off Oshadi Ranasinghe, left the West Indies in dire straits.

Nation, who top-scored with 46 off 57 balls, was bowled by Athapaththu, reducing the West Indies to 69 for 4. From there, Nisansala took over, exploiting the grip and turn of the surface with her slow left-arm orthodox deliveries. She trapped Zaida James leg before and accounted for Chinelle Henry, Afy Fletcher, and Qiana Joseph, all of whom fell attempting aggressive shots.

Nisansala completed her five-for by dismissing Aaliyah Alleyne, who chipped a return catch after a brief cameo of 27 off 27 balls. The West Indies' innings folded for 115, with Nisansala finishing with figures of 5 for 28, marking her first five-wicket haul in ODIs.

This victory marks Sri Lanka's second series whitewash against the West Indies and highlights the stark difference in form and execution between the two sides. The West Indies will need to reassess and regroup after a disheartening series, while Sri Lanka can take confidence from their dominant performances as they look ahead to future challenges.

Kane Williamson has stepped down as New Zealand's captain in both ODIs and T20Is, while also declining a central contract.

New Zealand endured a disappointing T20 World Cup campaign, exiting at the end of the group stage after losing their opening two games against Afghanistan and Papua New Guinea.

Williamson played his 100th Test earlier this year, leading New Zealand in 40 of those, and has 165 ODI caps and 93 T20I caps.

As captain, he led them to the World Test Championship title in 2021, and two finals in the ODI World Cup in 2019, and the T20 World Cup in 2021, both of which they lost.

With the hopes of prolonging his international career, the 33-year-old explained his decision to decline the contract for 2024-25.

"Helping push the team forward across the formats is something I'm very passionate about and something I want to keep contributing towards," Williamson said in a New Zealand Cricket (NZC) release.

"However, pursuing an overseas opportunity during the New Zealand summer means I'm unable to accept a central contract offer."

Ahead of last season, Williamson had given up his Test captaincy, with Tim Southee appointed as his successor.

Despite not taking the offer of a central contract, he has not written off signing one in the future if the timing is right.

"Playing for New Zealand is something I treasure, and my desire to give back to the team remains undiminished.

"My life outside cricket has changed, however. Spending more time with my family and enjoying experiences with them at home or abroad is something that's even more important to me."

Stafanie Taylor's brilliant innings of 73 runs guided the West Indies Women to a nerve-wracking two-wicket win over Pakistan Women in the second ODI of their series at the National Stadium in Karachi on Sunday.

Chasing a challenging target of 223 set by Pakistan, the West Indies found themselves in a tense battle, eventually reaching 225-8 off the final ball of the match to secure an unassailable 2-0 lead in the series.

Player of the Match Taylor was the linchpin of the West Indies' chase, anchoring the innings with crucial partnerships. Taylor's stand with Shemaine Campbell, who contributed a valuable 52 runs, proved pivotal as they shared an 88-run partnership for the third wicket. Captain Hayley Matthews also made a significant contribution with 44 runs before departing.

The West Indies Women looked poised for victory but encountered late drama, losing quick wickets that put the match on a knife's edge. Nida Dar's exceptional bowling effort (4-52) created tension in the dying moments, but the Caribbean side managed to hold their nerve.

In a thrilling finish, with the West Indies needing three runs off the final delivery, Karishma Ramharack smashed a boundary off Fatima Sana to seal the victory in dramatic fashion.

Earlier in the day, Pakistan Women won the toss and opted to bat first, posting a competitive total of 222 runs. Sidra Ameen's half-century (50) and Bismah Maroof's valuable 65 laid a solid foundation for Pakistan, with the pair stitching together an 80-run partnership for the second wicket.

However, the West Indies bowlers fought back strongly, led by Chinelle Henry (3-37) and Ramharack (3-48), who inflicted crucial blows to derail Pakistan's innings. Afy Fletcher also contributed with the ball, taking 2-46 to restrict Pakistan's scoring.

Despite the loss, Pakistan Women showed resilience and fought hard throughout the match, setting up an enthralling contest with the West Indies Women.

West Indies Women's captain Hayley Matthews delivered a stellar all-round performance to lead her team to a commanding 113-run victory over Pakistan Women in the first One Day International (ODI) at the National Stadium in Karachi on Thursday.

Matthews played a pivotal role in setting up the win, first with the bat and then with the ball. She showcased her batting prowess by scoring an impressive unbeaten 140 runs, anchoring the West Indies' innings to a challenging total of 269-8 in their allotted 50 overs. Matthews' innings was decorated with 15 boundaries (fours) and a well-struck six.

After losing an early wicket, Matthews combined forces with Shemaine Campbell to forge a crucial partnership of 102 runs for the second wicket. Campbell contributed a valuable 45 runs to the cause before departing.

Chinelle Henry (23) and contributions from Chedean Nation and Aaliyah Henry, who scored 17 each, further solidified the West Indies' innings as Matthews led from the front, steering her team to a formidable total.

In response, Pakistan Women struggled to build partnerships against the disciplined West Indies bowling attack. Tuba Hassan top-scored with 25 runs, while Muneeba Ali and Nahida Alvi made contributions of 22 and 20 runs, respectively.

However, it was Matthews who turned the game decisively in her team's favor with the ball, claiming three crucial wickets for just 17 runs. Afy Fletcher and Zaida James also made significant contributions with the ball, picking up two wickets each to bundle out Pakistan Women for 156 runs in 35.5 overs.

Sadia Iqbal (2-38) and Tuba Hassan (2-48) were the standout bowlers for Pakistan, but they couldn't contain Matthews' brilliance.

With this commanding victory, West Indies Women have taken a 1-0 lead in the three-match ODI series against Pakistan Women, setting the stage for an exciting contest in the upcoming matches.

 

In the second One Day International (ODI) at the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG), Australia secured a series victory against the West Indies with an 83-run win, thanks to an exceptional all-round performance from Sean Abbott and a resilient batting effort.

Opting to bat, Australia found themselves in a precarious position at 91 for 5, with Cameron Green and Marnus Labuschagne back in the pavilion. However, Abbott played a crucial role with the bat, crafting a career-best 69 runs. Abbott's fifty, along with contributions from Matthew Short and Aaron Hardie, propelled Australia to a competitive total of 258 for 9.

Gudakesh Motie, the left-arm spinner for the West Indies, exhibited his bowling prowess by claiming 3-28, keeping Australia in check for the majority of the innings. However, the Australian lower order, including Abbott, showcased their batting depth and resilience. Romario Shepherd took 2-50 while Alzarri Joseph proved expensive taking 2-74.

Abbott continued his stellar performance, returning with the ball to take 3-40 alongside Josh Hazlewood's 3-48, bowling out the West Indies for 175. Keacy Carty, who shone in the first ODI with 88 runs, once again displayed commendable batting skills, scoring 40. However, the top order struggled, with Alick Athanaze, Justin Greaves, and Kjorn Ottley providing little resistance to the Australian bowling attack.

West Indies Captain Shai Hope and Roston Chase made starts but failed to convert them into substantial scores, contributing 29 and 25 runs, respectively. Alzarri Joseph's 19 runs were the only other notable contribution in a disappointing batting performance from the West Indies.

Despite the West Indies' bowling efforts, Abbott's all-round brilliance, complemented by Hazelwood's bowling display, proved decisive as Australia secured an 83-run victory. The series win highlighted Australia's batting depth and ability to perform under pressure.

In a spectacular display of cricketing prowess, Australia claimed a convincing eight-wicket victory in the first One Day International (ODI) against the West Indies at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG). Debutant Xavier Bartlett stole the show with an extraordinary bowling spell, and Cameron Green's exceptional all-round performance guided Australia to a comprehensive win.

Xavier Bartlett, making his ODI debut, showcased his talent by dismantling the West Indies' top order with a remarkable 4 for 17. This performance marked the second-best figures on ODI debut for Australia, placing him just behind current selector Tony Dodemaide. Bartlett's ability to swing the ball both ways troubled the West Indies batsmen, setting the tone for Australia's dominance.

Matthew Lee, Director of the Jamaica Badminton Academy, drew parallels between Bartlett's impactful debut and the academy's commitment to nurturing talent. "Just like in badminton, where a player's debut can shape their entire journey, Bartlett's remarkable introduction to ODI cricket showcased the impact a debutant can have on the game."

Bartlett, along with fellow debutant Lance Morris, became the first pair of Australian debutants to open the bowling in an ODI since 2016. Bartlett's early breakthroughs, including a magical outswinger that dismissed Justin Greaves, left the West Indies struggling at 59 for 4.

The West Indies, anchored by Keacy Carty's career-best 88 and Roston Chase's gritty 59, managed to post a total of 231. However, Bartlett's spell had already set up the victory for Australia.

Josh Inglis provided a fiery start to Australia's chase with a quick-fire 65 off 43 balls. Inglis's aggressive approach set the tone, smashing ten fours and a six, and his whirlwind knock allowed Cameron Green to settle into the innings. Steven Smith's unbeaten run-a-ball 79 and Green's composed 77 not out guided Australia to victory with 11.3 overs to spare.

Despite the West Indies showing resilience with half-centuries from Carty and Chase, Bartlett's brilliance and Green's all-round show ensured Australia took a 1-0 lead in the series.

The MCG witnessed a dominant performance from Australia, with Bartlett's debut spell earning him well-deserved accolades. As the series progresses, cricket enthusiasts eagerly anticipate more exciting contests between these two cricketing giants. The West Indies, though faced with a setback, will look to bounce back in the upcoming ODIs, showcasing the resilience that makes cricket a thrilling and unpredictable sport.

 

In the wake of Shamar Joseph's stellar performance in the just-concluded two-Test series against Australia, West Indies' white-ball coach, Darren Sammy, finds himself grappling with a welcome selection headache.

Joseph, the hero of the historic Test victory at the Gabba, where he took 7 for 68, has set tongues wagging with his remarkable debut in the longer format of the game.

The young bowler had already announced his arrival in style by claiming a maiden five-wicket haul in his debut Test in Adelaide, a feat that included dismissing none other than Steven Smith with his very first ball in Test cricket. The cricketing world couldn't help but take notice of Joseph's incredible talent and composure on the grand stage.

Despite Joseph's absence from the initial white-ball squads for the upcoming limited-overs series against Australia, Sammy is eager to integrate the Test hero into the T20 and ODI squads. While Joseph has limited experience in T20 cricket, having played only two matches and yet to take a wicket in the format, Sammy sees him as a potential all-format star for the West Indies.

"He will definitely be an all-format player," asserted Sammy. "I can't wait to get my hands on him in this squad. But look, everything has a process to it. That's the way myself and the chairman of selectors operate. What he's done, he's created a really good headache for me with the World Cup coming up, building forward in the ODI team."

 

England fast bowler Steve Harmison announced his retirement from one-day international cricket on this day in 2006.

Harmison had always intended to retire from one-day international cricket after the 2007 World Cup but brought the decision forward after not being included in the 16-man squad to compete in the New Year triangular tournament with Australia and New Zealand.

“After careful consideration and having taken advice from several people who have been close to me throughout my career, I have decided to retire from one-day International cricket with immediate effect,” the then 28-year-old said.

“This has been a difficult decision but I want to play at the highest level for as long as I can and believe that concentrating solely on Test cricket is the best way forward for me during the next phase of what will hopefully be a long England career.”

Harmison made his ODI debut in December 2002 in a 43-run victory over Sri Lanka in Brisbane, claiming the prized wicket of Kumar Sangakkara as the first of 76 scalps in 58 ODIs.

He announced his retirement from all forms of cricket in October 2013 at the end of Durham’s title-winning season, saying he had delayed his announcement so as not to take any of the attention away from his county’s achievement.

England head coach Matthew Mott suspects a switch from ODIs to T20s and a shift to the top of the order can get Jos Buttler firing on all cylinders again.

Buttler’s World Cup hangover followed him to the Caribbean with two single-figure scores either side of a sparkling unbeaten fifty in a new-look England side’s 2-1 ODI series defeat by the West Indies.

He was out for a golden duck in Saturday’s decider in Barbados, caught at fine-leg after an imprudent hook, bringing the England captain’s average down to a modest 18.09 in his last dozen innings.

With ODIs on the back-burner till September, England can focus on building towards the T20 World Cup in June with a five-match series against the co-hosts, where Buttler will be in his usual opening role.

“It’s always good when you lose a series to change the format, you move on pretty quickly,” Mott said ahead of the T20 series opener on Tuesday at the Kensington Oval.

“Jos showed his class the other day and he may well, at the top of the order, come out and take the bowling on as he has done for for a number of years.”

Will Jacks and Phil Salt have put on four opening stands of 50 or more in five ODIs, finding some fluency together in the manner predecessor Jason Roy did, first with Alex Hales then Jonny Bairstow.

The pair’s success invites speculation as to whether England could persevere with the pair in T20s and move Buttler down to number three in a reshuffle, but Mott dismissed the notion out of hand.

“Jos is a lock-in, definitely opening,” Mott said. “He’s proven over a very long period of time.

“It will be just what he needs to get up the top and really boss the game from the start and I know for a fact he’s looking forward to it.”

Mott’s position came under scrutiny after England’s shambolic World Cup and he has lost 18 ODIs in his tenure and won 16 – but five of those have been against non-Test playing Ireland and the Netherlands.

A series defeat against a side that did not qualify for the World Cup was another low moment but the success of this tour might be judged on how the T20s pan out with a more experienced bunch of players.

Moeen Ali, Adil Rashid, Chris Woakes and Tymal Mills are now in tow and, alongside Reece Topley, they trained in Bridgetown barely 12 hours after England’s rain-affected defeat at the same venue.

The quintet give England more depth with the ball, while Mills and Topley are attractive options at the death after their pacemen struggled at the back end in the ODI defeats in Antigua and Barbados.

On both occasions, England were in with a sniff of victory courtesy of their spinners – led by teenager Rehan Ahmed, who was described as “a bit of a revelation for us with the ball” on this tour by Mott.

But Sam Curran was flayed and recorded the most expensive ODI figures by an England bowler in the opener while Gus Atkinson leaked 24 in an over when the Windies needed 33 in 24 balls in the finale.

“We’ve got some really good (death bowling) options,” Mott added. “The guys getting an opportunity haven’t had a lot of opportunity in this format yet but I think they will be better for the experience.

“Sam’s definitely a player that we really want to invest in. He hasn’t missed too often at the death for us. But he’s that type of bowler that wants the ball in his hand at the back end.

“When you’ve got guys who want to do that, they’ll come out on top more often than they miss it as well.”

Andrew Flintoff is due into Barbados on Sunday night and is scheduled to be at training on Monday as he rejoins England’s coaching set-up in a paid role as a team mentor.

England battled hard, but their first ODI series since the World Cup debacle ended in defeat after the West Indies pinched a nail-biting decider in Barbados.

Chasing a Duckworth-Lewis-Stern adjusted target of 188 in 34 overs after several rain interruptions, the Windies lurched from 99 for two to 135 for six following Will Jacks’ unlikely three wicket-haul.

But after Jacks and Rehan Ahmed were bowled out, leaving the Windies requiring 33 off the last four overs, Romario Shepherd greeted returning quick Gus Atkinson with back-to-back sixes to turn the tide.

Atkinson leaked 24 from the over and Shepherd ushered the Windies to a four-wicket win, with 14 balls to spare, with a belligerent 41 not out off 28 balls alongside debutant Matthew Forde (13no).

Forde earlier took three for 29 as England stumbled to 49 for five, with captain Jos Buttler out for a golden duck after an ill-judged hook at Alzarri Joseph took a top edge and ballooned to the fine leg fielder.

Ben Duckett’s classy 71 off 73 balls, putting on 88 with Liam Livingstone (45), dug England out of a hole and was the backbone of their 206 for nine in 40 overs, with the lower order adding some grit.

A 2-1 loss in their first assignment is hardly the start Buttler and head coach Matthew Mott would have wanted in this reset post-World Cup, but a top-order collapse left them with a mountain to climb after they were asked to bat first when play belatedly got under way following a two-hour rain delay.

England’s openers had made four successive partnerships of 50 or more, but were separated in the first over as Phil Salt’s lame chip just about carried to Joseph.

Forde’s day got better when Zak Crawley shaped to leave but the ball reared up off a length, thudded into his glove and looped into the slips.

The rookie’s only misstep occurred with a misfield on the boundary after Duckett’s meaty pull, giving the left-hander the first of three fours in an over but Forde atoned in his next over, hitting a nagging length and finding a bit of shape to take the edge of Jacks.

Matters deteriorated even further in the 10th over for England as Joseph’s direct hit ran out a diving Harry Brook while Buttler’s rush of blood to his first delivery left them five down.

England have endured some epic collapses in the Caribbean down the years and this briefly threatened to be added to an ignominious list, but Duckett and Livingstone stabilised the tourists.

Duckett was especially impressive, strong on his favoured cuts and pulls off the back foot but he eschewed his customary sweeps to the spinners until he had adjusted to an unpredictable pitch.

After going past 50, the left-hander then Livingstone upped the ante, each hammering sixes off Joseph but both perished when they were too early on balls holding up in the pitch. Duckett got a leading edge to short midwicket while in Shepherd’s next over, Livingstone miscued to mid-on.

After a 45-minute rain delay which led to England’s innings being reduced from 43 to 40 overs, last-wicket duo Atkinson and Matthew Potts got them above 200 with an unbroken stand of 35 off 29 balls.

Another downpour took more overs out of the game and meant a revised target, with England making a breakthrough after eight deliveries when Brandon King punched Atkinson to Jacks on the ring.

While Sam Curran found lavish movement and Potts, in for the unwell Brydon Carse, was tidy, there were no further inroads as Buttler turned to Ahmed in the ninth over. The leg-spinner was greeted with a glancing cut by Alick Athanaze before ending his over being driven for another four by Carty.

Ahmed clipped Athanaze’s off-stump without dislodging the bails, tricking England into a review for caught behind, before Atkinson returned to pin the left-handed opener lbw five short of his 50.

After Shai Hope tamely chipped Ahmed’s googly to midwicket, Buttler opted for spin at both ends on an increasingly wearing pitch where prodigious turn was on offer.

Jacks capitalised as Shimron Hetmyer lobbed to point while Sherfane Rutherford holed out. Carty, who had dropped two simple catches when the Windies fielded, made a crucial 50 but gave Jacks a return catch.

Jacks drew the edge of Shepherd two balls later but the ball whistled away for four while the Windies big-hitter threw his hands at Ahmed to alleviate some of the building pressure.

Buttler opted to turn to Atkinson after Ahmed and Jacks bowed out but the paceman delivered two full tosses which were dispatched over the rope, the first following a fumble by Livingstone.

There was no coming back from that for England and Shepherd sealed victory in Livingstone’s next over with a slog sweep for four.

Ben Duckett spared England’s blushes after a top-order collapse as the tourists posted 206 for nine in their rain-affected ODI series decider against the West Indies in Barbados.

Matthew Forde had a Windies debut to remember with three for 20 early on before Jos Buttler’s ill-judged hook to fine-leg saw him depart for a golden duck, which left England reeling on 49 for five in the 10th over.

Duckett ensured there was no capitulation, amassing 71 in 73 balls, and Liam Livingstone contributed 45 but they were prised out in quick succession in an ODI reduced to 43 overs each then 40 due to rain.

The start of this third ODI – with the teams sharing a win apiece in Antigua – was delayed by a couple of hours because of intermittent downpours but the Windies won what seemed an important toss.

While Matthew Potts replaced Brydon Carse, who was feeling unwell, the Windies brought in Forde, a 21-year-old seamer who capitalised on some unpredictable bounce and a hint of sideways movement.

Forde broke through in the first over as Phil Salt’s lame chip just about carried to Alzarri Joseph. Salt had put on four successive fifty-plus opening stands with Will Jacks but had to trudge off forlornly for four after replays showed Joseph with his hands under the ball.

It got even better in Forde’s next over when Zak Crawley tried to leave only to be surprised by some extra bounce, with the ball thudding into his glove and looping gently to Alick Athanaze in the cordon.

Forde’s only misstep came when he misfielded on the boundary after Duckett’s meaty pull, giving the left-hander the first of three fours in an over off Romario Shepherd. Forde immediately atoned, though, hitting a nagging length and finding a bit of shape to take the edge of Jacks, out for 17 off 20 balls.

Luck was with the Windies following the run out of Harry Brook, whose momentary hesitation before setting off for a single after nudging into the leg-side was his undoing following Joseph’s direct hit following an excellent pick up and throw off his bowling. Not even a desperate dive could save the Yorkshireman.

Two balls later and Buttler’s rush of blood to the head left England five down after 9.4 overs.

England have endured some epic collapses in the Caribbean and this briefly threatened to be added to the list but Duckett and Livingstone ensured they avoided total calamity.

Duckett put away his customary sweeps to the spinners until he had adjusted to the bounce and was nearing 50, after which he unleashed a couple of unrestrained pulls off Joseph for six and four.

Livingstone was initially watchful but followed Duckett in going on to the attack as he also cleared the rope off Joseph before being dropped on 31 when Keacy Carty shelled a simple chance in the deep.

An 88-run stand was ended when Duckett got a leading edge to short midwicket while Livingstone also seemed to be undone by the ball holding up a little as he clubbed to mid-on in Shepherd’s next over.

Another shower led to a 45-minute delay and another reduction in overs, leaving England seven more to negotiate.

From 167 for seven, the challenge would have been to post a 200-plus total and they did so courtesy of a handy last-wicket unbroken partnership of 35 from Gus Atkinson (20 not out) and Potts (15no)

Sam Curran redeemed himself after his weekend drubbing and England captain Jos Buttler rediscovered his Midas touch in his side’s series-levelling victory over the West Indies in Antigua.

Chasing 203, Will Jacks put England into the ascendancy with a sparkling 73 off 72 balls, including four sixes and six fours, but his downfall left the tourists wobbling on 116 for four in the 20th over.

Buttler, who had been averaging 14.1 since the start of a miserable World Cup for himself and his team, gradually bloomed and his unbeaten 58 off 45 deliveries – his first fifty in 14 ODIs – sealed England’s six-wicket win.

Harry Brook finished on 43 not out as England prevailed with 17.1 overs to spare although the architect of them ensuring a decider in Barbados on Saturday was Curran, who took three for 33 in seven overs.

Having recorded the most expensive figures by an England bowler in Sunday’s four-wicket defeat, leaking 98 runs in 9.5 overs, the left-arm seamer snared top-order trio Keacy Carty, Brandon King and Shimron Hetmyer.

After the Windies lurched to 23 for four, captain Shai Hope did his bit for nominative determinism, following up his match-winning ton a few days ago with a run-a-ball 68 and rookie Sherfane Rutherford chipped in with 63 before the pair were dismissed by Liam Livingstone, who took three for 39.

Curran was initially wayward again and belted for three fours by King but an opening stand that put on 104 on Sunday was snuffed out for 15 here after Gus Atkinson scythed through Alick Athanaze, with England’s review for caught behind showing a big snick on UltraEdge.

Curran’s fortunes shifted as angled deliveries took the edges of Carty and King to Zak Crawley before Hetmyer was rapped on the back pad by a fuller ball. The not-out verdict was overturned after Ben Duckett seemed to persuade Buttler into sending the decision upstairs.

Curran’s three wickets in eight balls left Hope and Rutherford, in his second ODI, with a mountainous rebuild. A 129-run stand followed as smoke from the barbecue vendors beyond the stands occasionally drifted across the ground, Hope settling with three straight driven fours in an Atkinson over.

Brydon Carse was taken the distance by Hope as the partnership grew, with both Windies batters going past fifties, Rutherford doing so with a mighty heave off the otherwise parsimonious Rehan Ahmed.

Having been held back until the 26th over, Livingstone broke the union when Rutherford drove loosely to Phil Salt in the ring while Yannic Cariah was castled through the gate by a floaty off-spinner.

Livingstone had the big fish with a precision piece of bowling, his leg-spinner leaving Hope in two minds, missing an indeterminate prod and his off-stump as a consequence.

Livingstone’s figures were dented by Romario Shepherd’s four fours in an over but the Windies subsided after he holed out to Rehan, whose figures of 10-1-40-2 were identical to what he recorded on Sunday.

Despite tricky conditions, Salt and Jacks were authoritative from the off, evoking the spirit of predecessors Jason Roy and first Alex Hales then Jonny Bairstow.

The pair rode their luck, edging wide of slip off Alzarri Joseph before Salt’s luck ran out on 21, bowled by Shepherd, after a 50-run stand.

The early battle between Joseph and Jacks was worth the entry fee alone. A rising snorter took Jacks’ glove and ballooned over Hope but the opener responded by hammering over backward square-leg and then repeated the trick off Shepherd. Jacks then smeared Oshane Thomas over backward point for a third six.

Crawley chopped on off Gudakesh Motie, who found the glove when Duckett went for a customary sweep before Brook edged agonisingly short of slip from his first ball as tension crept in.

Nerves may have been jangling when Jacks was lbw to one that kept low from Rutherford, bringing out Buttler, who had been dismissed for single figures in five of his previous eight innings.

He made a cagey start and was beaten twice on the outside edge by leg-spinner Cariah but he steadily grew in confidence alongside Brook.

A whipped four off Joseph was followed by a skip down the track and thump for back-to-back sixes off Cariah as Buttler started to find some rhythm.

The second of those monstrous blows was measured at 94 metres before another mighty mow off Thomas brought up a 43-ball half-century. Buttler took 16 off that Thomas over to level the scores.

It was left to Brook to get over the line and he did so by sweeping Motie behind square for four in the 33rd over.

Shai Hope and Romario Shepherd powered the West Indies to a four-wicket victory in the thrilling series-opening ODI in Antigua on Sunday.

Following a meek World Cup, England are at the start of a new era and they amassed 325 all out but Jos Buttler made his fifth single-figure score in eight ODIs after being dismissed for three off 13 balls.

It looked to be enough as the Windies lurched to 213 for five in the 39th over but Hope’s unbeaten 109 off 83 balls and a punchy 48 from 28 deliveries from Shepherd underpinned a remarkable home triumph.

Hope’s three sixes in four balls off the expensive Sam Curran, who leaked 98 in 9.5 wicketless overs, helped the Windies get over the line with seven balls to spare as they drew first blood in the series.

There were positives for an England side who had six individuals in their XI who were out in India as Harry Brook top-scored with 71 off 72 balls while Phil Salt amassed 45 off 28 balls while Curran (38 off 26) and Brydon Carse (31no off 21) put on a lifted England beyond 300 after a middle-order wobble.

Rehan Ahmed was the pick of England’s attack but they were unable to pin down a side who failed to qualify for the World Cup, while Buttler’s form is an increasing concern and his run of innings with an ODI fifty stretched to 13 innings.

England started well as Salt crunched eight boundaries off fast bowlers Alzarri Joseph and Shepherd but a turbocharged innings ended in tame fashion, vindicating the decision to introduce Gudakesh Motie’s left-arm spin after six overs.

Backing away to leg, Salt’s cut looped to the cover fielder to end a 77-run stand, while Will Jacks was gone for 26 in the next over after Joseph extracted extra bounce and found the outside edge.

Zak Crawley consolidated, initially alongside Test opening partner Ben Duckett then Brook, all of whom were watchful early on as the pitch started to become more unpredictable. Put down twice in the 30s, Crawley got to 48 when he set off for a single only to be left high and dry by Brook and run out.

Brook took 12 singles from his first 18 deliveries before reverse sweeping to the boundary while he accelerated after Buttler’s downfall with dismissive sixes off Shepherd and leg-spinner Yannic Cariah.

Liam Livingstone briefly got in on the act with back-to-back sixes in a Cariah over yielding 23 but the all-rounder and Brook were out in successive Shepherd overs. Livingstone was lbw to a delivery that kept low and Brook slapped a pace-off ball to mid-off, having added one run after being dropped on 70.

At 239 for seven with nine overs left, England were grateful for their lower order adding 86, underpinned by Curran and Carse putting on a belligerent 66 in just 38 balls. The pair each cleared the rope twice while Ahmed chipped in with a maximum as England’s innings ended with a flourish.

The hosts had only chased down 300-plus totals three times in ODIs but their attempt to overhaul the highest 50-over total at this venue began brightly courtesy of the highly rated Alick Athanaze.

The left-hander, leading run-scorer at the 2018 Under-19 World Cup, feasted on Curran’s waywardness, hooking a six in the first over before ending the powerplay with a mighty mow off Gus Atkinson.

Brandon King was less fluent but put on 104 alongside Athanaze before Ahmed prised the pair apart. Athanaze missed a sweep at a googly and was given leg-before for 66 while Livingstone breached the defences of King on 35 eight balls later as England’s spinners gave them a foothold.

Keacy Carty made just 16 in a 39-ball stay before he was trapped in front by Carse’s grubber and the run-rate was steadily escalating when Shimron Hetmyer walked to the crease.

Both Hetmyer and ODI debutant Sherfane Rutherford were caught on the boundary off Atkinson and Ahmed respectively as the Windies went into the last 10 overs requiring 106 runs for victory.

Hope was the wicket England prized most, though. A standout ODI talent, he went effortlessly through the gears, rotating the strike well while he also thumped the only six Ahmed conceded in his 10-1-40-2.

He went past 5,000 ODI runs before, with 90 needed off 48 balls, Shepherd went on the attack to Curran, muscling two leg-side sixes in an over containing 19 runs.

The 45th over, also bowled by Curran, went for 15 and the 47th by Carse was taken for 17 as Hope and Shepherd turned the tide. While Atkinson took out Shepherd lbw, Curran was powerless to stop Hope repeatedly hammering him over the rope as the Windies claimed victory.

Harry Brook underscored England’s bid for regeneration with an important 71 but captain Jos Buttler’s lean run of form continued in their first ODI against the West Indies in Antigua.

A chastening World Cup campaign has ushered in a new era for England although it was largely the contributions of individuals out in India who had the biggest impact in the first of three ODIs.

Three weeks on from their final match in the subcontinent, Brook top-scored in England’s 325 all out, with all of their batters reaching double figures except for Buttler and number 11 Gus Atkinson.

Buttler had a torrid World Cup, averaging 15.33 without passing 50 once, and never got going in Antigua before being dismissed for three off 13 balls after gloving a reverse sweep to the lone slip.

Sam Curran and Brydon Carse put on 66 in 38 balls down the order to get England over 300 after they had slipped to 239 for seven against a new-look Windies side who failed to qualify for the World Cup.

Phil Salt gave England a turbocharged start with a boundary-laden 45 in 28 balls after winning the toss under sunny skies while the tourists went on to record the highest ODI score at this ground, helped by occasionally shoddy fielding from their opponents.

Salt wasted no time in settling, crashing five fours and three meaty leg-side sixes off fast bowlers Alzarri Joseph and Romario Shepherd, forcing Windies captain Shai Hope to turn to spin after six overs.

The change worked as Salt ended an electric innings in tame fashion. He has struggled against left-arm spin in the past and he was snared by Gudakesh Motie after backing away to leg and lofting to cover.

Will Jacks had been in Salt’s slipstream in a 77-run stand but still dispatched a 96-metre six arcing over cover, aided slightly by a breeze blowing across the ground, before nicking off as England’s openers departed in quick succession.

Conditions seemed to grow trickier, with the ball occasionally keeping low, as Test openers Zak Crawley and Ben Duckett attempted to build on England’s rapid start.

Duckett’s customary sweeps, both orthodox and reverse, came to the fore but he had his leg-stump pegged back by one that skidded on from leg-spinner Yannic Cariah, who should have had Crawley on 30 but a top-edged which looped gently to long-on was spilled by Motie, possibly unsighted by the sunshine.

Crawley was run out for 48 after setting off for a single, only to see Brook had not budged, allowing Hope to whip off the bails following Alick Athanaze’s throw from point.

Brook was initially quiet, nudging and nurdling 12 singles from his first 18 balls before reverse sweeping Motie for his first four. His second boundary was the result of more Windies misfielding as Keacy Carty got in a tangle and the ball sailed underneath his legs.

He kept England ticking over then accelerated after Buttler’s departure, clubbing Shepherd then Cariah for sixes. Cariah was also taken the distance twice by Livingstone in an over costing 23 but the England all-rounder fell for 17, trapped lbw by a grubber from Shepherd.

Brook was dropped at point on 70 but added just another run before being deceived by Shepherd’s pace-off delivery and thumping to mid-off.

At 239 for seven, England’s lower order had work to do but Sam Curran, who had a fringe role at the World Cup, and Carse, an unused squad member, helped the tourists finish with a flourish.

Both lower order batters cleared the rope twice to carry England beyond 300 before Curran was run out on 38. Carse was unbeaten on 31.

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