Six-time World champion Noah Lyles says his next goal is to add some indoor hardware to his collection.

Speaking in an interview with Trinidadian legend Ato Boldon last week, Lyles says his next goal is to take home the 60m world title at the upcoming World Indoor Championships set for March 1-3 in Glasgow, Scotland.

“The goal is to win the World Championships indoor,” the 26-year-old told Boldon.

To win that crown, Lyles will likely have to beat countryman and current World indoor 60m record holder, Christian Coleman, who took gold at the 2018 World Indoor Championships in Birmingham. Coleman set the current world record 6.34 earlier that year. 2022 World 100m champion Fred Kerley will also compete indoors this season.

Lyles is coming off a phenomenal 2023 outdoor season. He won a trio of gold medals at the World Championships in Budapest in August, becoming the first man since Usain Bolt to achieve the feat.

At those World Championships, Lyles produced a new personal best of 9.83 to win his maiden World 100m title.

Lyles also had one of his best indoor seasons last year, including a personal best 6.51 to win the 60m at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix in New York last February.

He has never competed at the World Indoor Championships.

 

 

The Paris Olympics and Euro 2024 will underpin next year’s sporting calendar.

Here, the PA news agency picks out 10 stars who are expected to shine.

Sky Brown

Britain’s skateboard superstar claimed an historic bronze medal at the delayed Tokyo 2020 Olympics and will head to Paris as the reigning world champion in the park category. Still only 15, Brown has still not given up hope of also representing Team GB in the Olympic surfing event in Tahiti.

Simone Biles

One of the world’s greatest ever gymnasts launched a spectacular return in 2023, after an extended hiatus to prioritise mental health. With a remarkable four world golds, including in the prestigious women’s all-around, Biles once again set her stall out as the star to watch in Paris.

Noah Lyles

The US track star dazzled in 2023, winning gold in both 100m and 200m at the World Championships in Budapest. Looking to build on the 200m bronze he took in Tokyo, Lyles is intent on expanding his horizons by potentially also forming a part of the men’s 4x400m relay squad.

Jude Bellingham

England’s Bellingham has made a stunning start to his Real Madrid career, scoring 12 goals in his first 14 LaLiga appearances and also becoming the first player to score in each of his first four Champions League appearances for the club. A sensational platform at Euro 2024 in Germany awaits.

Sam Walters

The 6ft 6ins Walters was one of the more dependable figures in another testing rugby league season for Leeds Rhinos, so it came as a great surprise that he was allowed to leave to join rivals and reigning Super League champions Wigan. Walters’ speed and power can only make the champions stronger.

Jannik Sinner

Speedy baseliner Sinner has been threatening to move into serious grand slam title contention for some time and the signs are that 2024 could be his year. Sinner won two of four meetings with Novak Djokovic – including a dramatic Davis Cup rubber – and more of the same is seemingly assured for 2024.

Luca Brecel

He probably will not practice and will be one of the first to write off his chances. But enigmatic Belgian Luca Brecel will return to the Crucible in April as the defending world snooker champion – and one of the few top-level current players who can boast the stamina to get to the end of the 17 gruelling days.

Kylian Mbappe

Mbappe might not be in the best of moods in relation to his club career but his importance to France – and his ability to light up the game’s biggest stages – will be in evidence during Euro 2024. Moreover, Mbappe still harbours hopes of appearing as an over-age player at the Paris Olympics.

Keely Hodgkinson

So far it has been a career of so near yet so far for the British 800 metres ace, who has had to settle for silver medals at consecutive world championships, as well as the Tokyo Olympics and the Birmingham Commonwealth Games. All eyes will be on her bid to go one better in Paris.

Nat Sciver-Brunt

The all-rounder, who has landed a deal to play for Perth Scorchers in the next women’s Big Bash, will play a pivotal role when England are scheduled to head to Bangladesh in 2024 as one of the favourites to clinch the women’s T20 world title.

Six athletes – Tigist Assefa, Mondo Duplantis, Kelvin Kiptum, Faith Kipyegon, Noah Lyles and Yulimar Rojas – have been announced as World Athletes of the Year for 2023.


The world champions and world record-breakers were the final winners to be revealed as part of the World Athletics Awards 2023 on Monday (11), following confirmation of this year’s Rising Stars: world 3000m steeplechase bronze medallist Faith Cherotich and world 800m silver medallist Emmanuel Wanyonyi.


The adaptation of the World Athlete of the Year honours awarded this year follows feedback received during the voting process. Many sensational performances – including an extraordinary 23 world records* – were achieved in 2023. When it came to compiling the votes, athletes, fans and World Athletics Family members commented that it was incredibly hard to limit the vote to just one athlete, because of the various disciplines and the vast differences in skill sets required. As a result, for 2023 the World Athlete of the Year awards have been divided into three event categories: track, field and out of stadia.


“The depth of talent and the outstanding performances in our sport this year more than justify the expansion of the World Athletics Awards to recognise the accomplishments by these six athletes across a range of disciplines,” said World Athletics President Sebastian Coe. “Our World Athletes of the Year alone have achieved seven world records between them in 2023, as well as a host of world titles and major wins, so it is only fitting that they be recognised as the athletes of the year in their respective fields.


“I congratulate our award winners and all of the athletes nominated for these honours.”


World Athletes of the Year for 2023

Women’s track: Faith Kipyegon, KEN, 1500m/mile/5000m
Women’s field: Yulimar Rojas, VEN, triple jump
Women’s out of stadia: Tigist Assefa, ETH, marathon
Men’s track: Noah Lyles, USA, 100m/200m
Men’s field: Mondo Duplantis, SWE, pole vault
Men’s out of stadia: Kelvin Kiptum, KEN, marathon


Assefa, Duplantis, Kiptum and Kipyegon set world records in their respective events in 2023, while all six World Athletes of the Year secured world titles or major marathon wins.

 

 


The moment of the year for Assefa came at the BMW Berlin Marathon in September, when the Ethiopian 27-year-old ran 2:11:53, smashing the world record by two minutes and 14 seconds and achieving the biggest single improvement on the mark for 40 years.


She finished almost six minutes ahead of her nearest rival after clocking 1:06:20 for the first half and an even faster 1:05:33 for the second half – a time that just seven women have beaten this year in a standalone half marathon.


Kiptum also achieved his world record in a World Athletics Platinum Label road race, running 2:00:35 at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in October. Becoming the first athlete to break 2:01 in a record-eligible marathon, the 24-year-old Kenyan won the race by almost three and a half minutes and took 34 seconds off Eliud Kipchoge’s previous world record.


Just one year on from his marathon debut, Kiptum now has three of the seven fastest times in history to his name having also won the TCS London Marathon in April in 2:01:25.


Duplantis improved his world pole vault record both indoors and outdoors in 2023, while he also retained the world title and achieved 20 clearances of 6.00m or higher.

 


Indoors, the Swedish 24-year-old added a centimetre to his previous outright best, clearing 6.22m in Clermont-Ferrand. During the outdoor season, he secured his second consecutive world title in Budapest and then won his third Wanda Diamond League trophy with a clearance of 6.23m on his first attempt to better his world record by another centimetre.


Kipyegon set world records at an incredible three distances during a season in which she also achieved a golden double at the World Athletics Championships Budapest 23.


First, the 29-year-old Kenyan improved the world 1500m record to 3:49.11 in Florence, taking almost a full second off the previous mark. Just one week later, and despite having raced the 5000m just twice before, she improved the world record for that event, too, clocking 14:05.20 in Paris to shave 1.42 seconds from the old record. Her third world record came in Monaco, where she smashed the previous mile mark by five seconds, clocking 4:07.64. Then, in Budapest, she won her third senior world 1500m title and her first world 5000m crown.


Lyles also achieved an individual title double at the World Championships in Budapest, winning 100m gold and retaining his 200m title before forming part of USA’s victorious 4x100m team.


The 26-year-old won the 100m in 9.83 – which saw him end the season as joint world leader – and the 200m in 19.52. He went even faster at the Diamond League meeting in London, clocking 19.47 to maintain his position as world 200m leader for the sixth consecutive year, during a season in which he was undefeated in six 200m finals.


Rojas won her fourth world outdoor title in Budapest and the Venezuelan 28-year-old also claimed her third consecutive Diamond League trophy.


Despite being in eighth place going into the final round at the World Championships, the world record-holder kept her cool and managed to soar 15.08m with her final attempt, moving her into the lead by eight centimetres. That secured her an eighth global gold medal. Then, at the Diamond League Final in Eugene, she improved her world lead to 15.35m for a mark just 39cm off her own world record.

 

 

 

 

 

American Christian Coleman followed up his 9.83-second clocking in Xiamen with a similar performance at the Prefontaine Classic to claim the men’s 100m Diamond League crown in Eugene on Saturday.

It was always expected to be a breathtaking dash and despite Ackeem Blake’s false-start disqualification, the event lived up to its hype with Coleman’s time, like it did in China, again equalled the world lead of 9.83s, which was first set by Noah Lyles in August.

Lyles the World Champion, closed fast for second in 9.85s, while Kenya’s Omanyala Ferdinand was third with a similar time of 9.85s.

Jamaican Kishane Thompson, 22, in his first real competitive season got out well but faded into fourth in 9.87s. Another Jamaican Yohan Blake was sixth in 10.08s.

Jamaica’s Kishane Thompson clocked a new lifetime best 9.85s for second in the men’s 100m, behind American Christian Coleman, who equalled the World Leading time of 9.83s at the Wanda Diamond League in Xiamen, China on Saturday.

Thompson, who has been holding good form since his first sub-10 second clocking at Jamaica’s National Championships in July, produced a top performance, which not only shattered his previous personal best of 9.91s, but also makes him the fastest Jamaican this year. He overtook Oblique Seville at 9.86s.

Additionally, the 22-year-old Thompson’s time also makes him the sixth-fastest Jamaican of all time. Only Usain Bolt (9.58s), Yohan Blake (9.69s), Asafa Powell (9.72s), Nesta Carter (9.78s) and Steve Mullings (9.80s), have gone faster.

While Thompson’s achievement, which makes him the 22nd fastest man of all time and also earned him a spot in the Diamond League final, may come as a surprise to many, his coach Stephen Francis did indicate that there was more to come after his one-round run at the national championships.

“He would have run significantly faster but the most important thing is that he feels healthy and can look forward to the rest of the summer. Our plan is to ensure that next year, in the Olympic year, he will have the necessary race experience and a different attitude to tackle the full program,” Francis said then in an interview with Sportsmax.tv.

Thompson just failed to get back to Coleman, who equalled Noah Lyles World leading time, as they competed in a slight tailwind of 0.4 metres per second. American Fred Kerley (9.96s) was third.

Meanwhile, the other Jamaicans, Yohan Blake (10.04s), Rohan Watson (10.18s), were sixth and ninth respectively, while Ackeem Blake, who seemingly picked up an injury finished at the back of the pack in well over 25 seconds.

Jamaica's Andrew Hudson and Alexander Ogando of Dominican Republic failed to challenge for a medal, as American Noah Lyles completed the sprint double with another dominant performance in the men’s 200 metres final at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Friday. 

Lyles, who entered the Championships brimming with confidence to not only win three gold medals, but also to challenge Usain Bolt's World Record of 19.19s in the half-lap event, delivered to some extent, adding the gold to his 100m triumph. However, his winning time of 19.52s, was well off Bolt's mark set back in 2009.
 
Another American Erriyon Knighton (19.75s) was second with Botswana's Letsile Tebogo (19.81s) in third.
 
Hudson, who was a late addition to the final after he got glass in his eyes from an accident which hindered his semi-final performance, placed eighth in 20.40s, while Ogando was seventh in 20.23s.

World 100m champion Noah Lyles remained on course for the sprint double after winning his semi-final heat in a fast 19.76s at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Thursday. Also through are Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes and Letsile Tebogo, the other medallists in the blue-ribbon sprint.

After initilally failing to progress with compatriot Rasheed Dwyer, Andrew Hudson was added to the medal event which will now see all nine lanes being occupied.

Lyles unleashed his superior speed and put distance between himself and Alexander Ogando of the Dominican Republic who clocked in at 20.22 to seal his spot in the final.

Meanwhile, Tebogo show-boated down the home stretch looking across at Kenneth Bednarek of the United States, who won the heat in 19.96, with the Botswanian close behind in 19.97.

The USA’s Erriyon Knighton is also in the final after winning his heat in 19.98 with Hughes close behind in 20.02. Four athletes from the heat advanced to the final as Canada’s Andre DeGrasse (20.10) and Liberia’s Joseph Fahnbulleh (20.21) took the spots for non-automatic qualifiers.

Hudson, who was fifth in his heat in 20.38, almost didn’t compete as the cart taking to the stadium collided with another and resulted in flying glass getting into his eye. As such, the officials felt it was only fair to give him a lane in the final.

Dwyer was sixth in the final heat in 20.49.

 

Andrew Hudson and Rasheed Dwyer of Jamaica both advanced to the semi-final round of the 200m during the opening session of Day 5 of the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Wednesday.

Hudson, the Jamaican champion, came home in second place in Heat 2 that was won by 100m champion Noah Lyles. The American who is favoured to win the sprint double, cruised through the finish line in an impressive-looking 20.05, barely breaking a sweat in sweltering conditions.

Hudson, meanwhile, who challenged Lyles over the first 150m, visibly backed off to take an automatic qualifying spot in 20.25. Ondřej Macik of the Czech Republic also advanced from the heat after finishing third in 20.40.

Dwyer also ran 20.40 for third place in Heat 5.

Towa Uzawa of Japan surged to the lead late to win the heat in 20.34 with the USA’s Courtney Lindsay close behind in 20.39.

Also through to the semi-final round are medal contenders, Letsile Tebogo of Botswana, Zharnel Hughes of Great Britain and Erriyon Knighton of the USA.

Tebogo, the 100m silver medalist, who is expected to challenge Lyles for the gold medal, was in complete command of Heat 3, striding to victory in an easy 20.22 while Knighton won Heat 6 in 20.17 over Canada’s Andre DeGrasse, who ran 20.28.

Hughes, the bronze medallist in the 100m, easily won the opening heat in 19.99, the fastest time heading into the semi-finals with Canada’s Aaron Brown a close second in 20.08.

Brown’s compatriot, Brendon Rodney won Heat 4 in a season’s best 20.14 as did the USA's Kenny Bednarek, who sped to a 20.01 clocking to win the final of the seven heats. Alexander Ogando of the Dominican Republic crossed in second place in a time of 20.14.

 

 

In a stirring battle for the 100m gold medal at the end of day two of the 2023 World Athletics Championships on Sunday, the USA’s Noah Lyles emerged victorious in 9.83 but it was not close to the 9.65 that he had predicted.

In what was one of the closest finishes in years, the battle for the other two medals came down to mere milliseconds as Letsile Tebogo, Zharnel Hughes and Oblique Seville were each credited with the same time of 9.88. Tebogo’s time was a new national record for Botswana.

Seville lost the bronze medal by 0.003 seconds as Tebogo was timed in 9.873, Hughes in 9.874 and Seville 9.877.

Christian Coleman, the 2019 champion, was fourth in 9.92.

Jamaica’s Ryiem Forde, in his first global final, was eighth in 10.08.

Though disappointed with the outcome, Seville thought he did his best under the circumstances but admitted to crucial errors late in the race. “I think it was an excellent performance up to the last part of my race which wasn’t that good but as my coach always told me it’s milliseconds that separates us  and I think  that was what separated me from a bronze medal,” he said.

He explained further the mistakes he made in the race.

“Well, everyone was close at the line and I think I should have stayed with my technique a little bit more because I dipped very early, which actually cost me.”

Great Britain’s speed king Zharnel Hughes grabbed brilliant bronze to make history in the 100m final at the World Championships.

The 28-year-old clocked 9.88 seconds to finish third on Sunday night – less than an hour after Katarina Johnson-Thompson won heptathlon gold in Budapest.

Hughes becomes the first British man to win an individual 100m sprint medal at the worlds in 20 years – since Darren Campbell’s bronze in 2003.

The USA’s Noah Lyles took the title in 9.83 seconds with Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo winning silver just a thousandth of a second ahead of Hughes.

European 200m champion Hughes went into the race as the fastest man in the world this year and was boosted after defending champion Fred Kerley crashed out in the semi final, along with Olympic champion Marcell Jacobs.

Hughes, ranked 12th in the world ahead of the Championships, had qualified fourth fastest after running 9.93s in his semi.

Yet he had struggled with a slow start in the heat and semi and, despite the fastest reaction time in the final, still needed to recover in the last 50m to ensure he snatched a podium place in a tight race.

It caps a remarkable summer for the Anguilla-born star, who trains under Usain Bolt’s former coach Glen Mills, after he broke two long-standing British records.

In June, he shattered Linford Christie’s 30-year 100m record by running 9.83s in New York.

A month later in London, he broke John Regis’ 200m mark to post 19.73s.

Eugene Amo-Dadzie, an accountant who is due back to work as a senior management accountant for property developer Berkeley Group on August 29, bowed out in the semi-final after running 10.03s – still quicker than Olympic champion Marcell Jacobs.

Reece Prescod ran 10.26s and also failed to qualify, ending his Championships with the 25-year-old pulling out of the 4x100m relay squad last week.

After three electrifying semi-final rounds of the 100m on Sunday, Oblique Seville announced himself as a possible contender for the gold medal in the blue-ribbon sprint at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Sunday.

Seville will be joined by compatriot Ryiem Forde in the event that will crown a new champion this year, as defending champion  Fred Kerley was eliminated after finishing third in Seville’s heat.

Seville exploded from the blocks in the last of the three heats and took control mid-race before easing across the line in 9.90 and looking like he had much more in the tank. Letsile Tebogo of Botswana clinched the other automatic qualifying spot when he finished second on 9.98.

The big surprise was Kerley, the 2022 champion, who looked out of sorts while finishing third in 10.02 and will take no further part in the competition.

Noah Lyles, the brash American, who said he was going to win the gold medal in 9.65, stormed to victory in his semi-final heat in 9.87 punching the air as he crossed the line as he booked his place in the final. Japan’s Abdul Sani-Brown ran a personal best 9.97 to book his spot.

Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala who was third in 10.01 and who was on the bubble and dependent on how the other heats unfolded, celebrated his spot in the final as his time was 0.01 faster than Kerley’s.

Jamaica’s champion Rohan Watson missed out on a berth in the final when he finished fifth in the heat in 10.07.

Christian Coleman raced to a time of 9.88 to win the second semi-final heat comfortably ahead of Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes, who clocked 9.93 for second place. Forde ran a personal best 9.95 for third place and a spot in the final.

 

 

There were no surprises, as Jamaica’s trio of Oblique Seville, Rohan Watson and Ryiem Forde all secured their spot in the men’s 100 metres semi-finals, along with Guyana’s Emanuel Archibald, after all safely navigated their respective heats on the opening day of the World Athletic Championships in Budapest, Hungary, on Saturday.

After a series of delays and false starts, Seville, who just missed the podium in Eugene, ran a comfortable race from lane seven in heat five and stopped the clock in 9.86s, which equalled his personal best.

The 22-year-old, who was the fastest qualifier across all seven heats, won ahead of one of the gold medal favourites in American Fred Kerley, who cruised to 9.99s. Belize’s Brandon Jones, who was also in the heat, placed seventh in 10.95s.

Seville pointed out that he had no concerns about the delays, as the experience gained over the years prepared him for what transpired.

“It is something that happens often in Jamaica, so it actually prepared me for now on the big stage. It was just for me to go out and execute and run a good time, I didn’t expect it but my coach did because he told me I am in the best of shape, so it was just for me to go out there and do what I have to,” Seville said shortly after performance.

Jamaica’s national championship Watson recovered from a slight stumble at the start to place second in the following heat.

He clocked 10.11s, behind Japan’s Sani Brown, who clocked a season’s best 10.07s, with Italy’s Lamonth Jacobs, also finishing in a season’s best 10.15s, as he continues to work his way back to form.

British Virgin Islands Rikkoi Brathwaite (10.18s) and Terrence Jones (10.32s) of Bahamas, fifth and sixth respectively in the same heat.

Earlier, another Jamaican Forde, also comfortably secured his spot, clocking 10.01s for second behind Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes, who clocked a flat 10.00s in winning heat one.

Favourite Noah Lyles was the second fastest in qualifying, as he stormed to 9.95s in heat two, with the powerfully built Kenyan Ferdinand Omanyala (9.97s), joining him.

Meanwhile, Antigua and Barbuda’s Cejhae Greene (10.23s) missed out on the semi-finals after placing sixth in heat four, which was won by Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo in 10.11s.

Guyana’s Emanuel Archibald, who ran earlier this morning to progress to the heats, successfully went one step further as he booked his spot in the semi-finals.

Archibald was given joint third with a time of 10.20s, along with Japan’s Hiroki Yanagita, behind South Africa’s Akani Simbine, who won the final heat in 9.97s, just edging American Cristian Coleman (9.98s).

The semi-finals are scheduled for Sunday at 9:35am Jamaica time.

 

You can catch live action of the 2023 World Athletic Championships by downloading the Sportsmax App.

Noah Lyles will be on a double mission in Budapest later this month as he goes for World Championships sprint glory while trying to drag track and field into the modern age.

The charismatic 26-year-old, a two-time world 200m champion, has his own popular Youtube channel and organises fashion ‘walk-ins’ at athletics events.

He is also the driving force behind the latest Netflix sport documentary, focusing on sprinters, in which he will star along with fellow American Fred Kerley and Britain’s Dina-Asher Smith.

However, Lyles’ enthusiasm with track and field’s potential is tempered by his frustration at what he sees as the ambivalence of those in authority.

 

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Noah Lyles (@nojo18)


“What’s wrong with track and field? How much time you got?,” he smiled.

 

“Let’s just say I’m a very ambitious individual. When I see growth in other areas of my life or places where I want it to be better, I’m very eager to be like, ‘how can I help?’

“What I’m realising is where there are athletes like that and people like me, the people who are actually in charge don’t have a goal, or don’t want to create a goal and it’s been a very frustrating realisation.

“Where I’ve seen a lot of people make pushes and be ready to step out of their comfort zone, again there’s a lot of people who aren’t and that’s disappointing.

“I was having a conversation with another athlete who wants to make a track meet in his city and that’s cool.

“But he wants to get it ratified and was struggling with that. That’s just a risk they’re not willing to take.

“The hoops you have to jump through… this shouldn’t be a hard process, just create a one-day track meet, get some advertising behind it, invite athletes.

“But it’s not one of those things that can be done and I feel his pain because I have goals like that. It should be simple but it’s not and people are just ignoring the idea of it as a whole.”

Last month Lyles won the 200m at the London Stadium in the race in which Zharnel Hughes broke John Regis’ British record.

 

Lyles came out on top in the warm-up for the World Championships (John Walton/PA)

 

The man from Florida will face a gruelling schedule in Hungary as he bids for glory on three fronts – to retain his 200m crown and add golds in the 100m and the relay.

“Yeah, I’ve recently had a look at it and my chiropractor has already asked what day he should come,” he added.

“We got the 100m rounds and then two days off, which is nice, but then another four rounds – three in the 200 and then the last round of the 4×100 finals – so it’s going to be really busy. But I’m confident in my team that we can get it done.

“I’ve qualified for the 100, and I already have gold medals in the 200 and the 4×100 from 2019, so I definitely want to add another gold medal to that.”

Janieve Russell, Natoya Goule-Toppin and Shericka Jackson made the podium in their respective events at the London Diamond League meeting on Sunday.

In what was the last Diamond League meet before the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest next month, Femke Bol produced the performance of the day with a record-break run in the 400m hurdles and Noah Lyles emerged victorious from stern battle with Letsile Tebogo in the 200m.

Russell continued her solid form this season after coming in second in the 400m hurdles at the London Diamond League on Sunday. However, her performance was overshadowed by the massive lifetime best performance of Bol of the Netherlands.

Russell, who won at the Jamaican trials earlier this month, clocked in a smart time of 53.75 but she was more than two seconds behind Bol, who joined the pantheon of two women who have run the event in under 52 seconds.

The European champion smashed her previous best of 52.03 when she stormed across the finish line in a world-leading 51.45. Only world record holder Sydney McLaughlin-Levrone and Dalilah Mohammed have run faster.

The world-leading time was also an Area Record, Diamond League record and National Record.

Shamier Little of the United States was third in 53.76 with Rushell Clayton fourth in a blanket finish where 0.02s separated second, third and fourth.

Goule-Toppin has been consistently fast over 800m this season and she showed that again Sunday with a new season’s best time of 1:57.61 for a second place finish in the 800m. She managed to hold off Uganda’s Halimah Nakaayi for set a new national record of 1:57.62 in finishing in third place.

Jemma Reekie of Great Britain won the keenly contested event in a new meet record of 1:57.30, a season’s best for the 25-year-old Briton.

An obviously fatigued Shericka Jackson, running her third race in a week, finished third in the 100m dash in which Marie Josee Ta Lou stormed to a new meet record of 10.75. Dina Asher-Smith took the runner-up spot in 10.85 with Jackson laboring through the line in 10.94 for third.

The men’s 200m was electrifying with Lyles just managing to hold of Letsile Tebogo to win in a new meet record and world-leading time of 19.47. Tebogo ran a brand new personal best of 19.50 for second place. It was a new lifetime best and African Area record for the youngster. In third was Zharnel Hughes who ran a new British record of 19.73.

Holloway, the two-time defending world champion, sped to a 13.01 clocking to win the 110m hurdles. Japan’s Shunsuke Izumiya was close behind in 13.06 while Jamal Britt of the USA crossing in 13.25 to edge out Olympic champion Hansle Parchment (13.26) for third place.

World-record holder Wayde van Niekerk won a close battle in the 400m over Bryce Deadmon and Vernon Norwood. The South African clocked 44.36 to edge Deadmon who came in second in 44.40 with Norwood not far behind in 44.46 for third place.

 

 

 

 

Olympic and World Championship silver-medalist, Marileidy Paulino of the Dominican Republic, continued her unbeaten start to the 2023 season by outdueling American 400m hurdles world record holder, Sydney McLaughlin-Levrone, to win the 400m at the Paris Diamond League on Friday.

McLaughlin-Levrone, the reigning Olympic and World Champion and in the 400m hurdles, ran extremely aggressively in the first 300m before Paulino used her experience in the flat 400m to reel her in and cross the line first in 49.12. The American ran a personal best 49.71 for second while 2019 World Champion Salwa Eid Naser ran 49.95 for third.

Elsewhere on the track, Kenyan Faith Kipyegon, who set a spectacular 1500m world record in Florence last week, was at it again, running 14:05.20 to set a new world record in the 5000m. Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey, the previous world record holder, was second in 14:07.94 while her countrywomen Ejgayehu Taye was third in 14:13.31.

Commonwealth Champion, Kyron McMaster, ran a season’s best for fifth in the 400m hurdles.

The BVI native, who fell at the LA Grand Prix on May 27, ran 48.65. The race was won by American CJ Allen in 47.92 ahead of France’s Wilfried Happio (48.26) and World Championship bronze medalist Trevor Bassitt (48.28).

Jamaica’s Natoya Goule ran a season’s best 1:58.23 for third in the Women’s 800m. Keely Hodgkinson took the race in a new personal best, British record and world leading 1:55.77 while American Ajee Wilson was second in 1:58.16.

2011 World 100m champion, Yohan Blake, ran 10.16 for fourth in the Men’s 100m behind reigning 200m World Champion, Noah Lyles (9.96), Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala (9.98) and Botswanan World Junior record holder Letsile Tebogo (10.05).

In the field, Jamaican 2019 World Championship silver medalist Danniel Thomas-Dodd threw 19.25m for fourth in the Women’s shot put behind Portugal’s Auriol Dongmo (19.72m) and Americans Chase Ealey (19.43m) and Maggie Ewen (19.26m).

 

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