Harry Kane admits he would "swap everything I've done in my career" to win Euro 2024 with England, who face Spain in Sunday's final.

The Three Lions, who were runners-up to Italy in the delayed Euro 2020, are appearing in their second successive European Championship show-piece, and aiming to go the extra step by claiming their first major tournament silverware since lifting the 1966 World Cup.

Kane has already made history at this tournament, becoming the record goalscorer in the knockout stages of both the European Championship (six) and major tournaments overall among European players (nine).

England and Tottenham's all-time leading scorer, the Bayern Munich striker is still seeking the first team trophy of his impressive career, and he is desperate to end that wait in Berlin.

"It's no secret that I haven't won a team trophy," he told reporters during the pre-match press conference. "Every year that goes by, you are more determined and motivated to change that.

"I have the opportunity to win one of the biggest [trophies] you can ever win and make history with my nation.

"I am extremely proud to be English so, no question, I'd swap everything I've done in my career to have a special night and a win tomorrow evening, but that's not the case.

"[There will be] a lot of hard work from now and until that moment. I'm ready to go and to make tomorrow night a special one."

It will certainly not be easy for England against the most impressive team of the tournament in Spain, who have won all six of their matches while scoring 13 goals for the loss of just four.

La Roja have put host nation Germany and France to the sword along the way, and are widely regarded as the favourites to lift the Henri Delaunay cup at the Olympiastadion.

Asked if he thought that was the case, Kane added: "That's not for me or the players to decide. That's for the media, the fans to think of favourites.

"But Spain have had a fantastic tournament. They have probably been the best team, consistency-wise throughout the tournament, so they probably earn that right, but as we know in football, in one game, anything can happen.

"We back ourselves against anyone we play against. We've been through difficult spells in this tournament, but we've come through the other side. That builds a tremendous amount of belief and resilience, which is everything you need in a final.

"We expect a tough game. We're in a European final, so we expect nothing less, and Spain will be difficult tomorrow night."

Gareth Southgate believes England must win Euro 2024 on Sunday if they are to earn "the respect of the footballing world".

The Three Lions face Spain in the tournament's climax at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, aiming to land only the second major silverware of their history - 58 years after their World Cup triumph on home soil.

Runners-up to Italy at the delayed Euro 2020, England are only the fourth different nation to appear in successive European Championship finals - along with Spain, Germany and the Soviet Union.

Southgate, who has led his nation to their first major tournament final on foreign soil, has also guided them to the 2018 semi-finals and 2022 quarter-finals at the two World Cups he has overseen.

And the Three Lions head coach acknowledges all that is missing is a trophy.

"We tried to change the mindset from the start," he told reporters during his pre-match press conference. "We tried to be more honest about where we were as a football nation.

"I've travelled to World Cups, European Championships watching as an observer and watched highlight reels of matches on the big screens - and we weren't in any of them.

"We needed to change that. We had high expectations, but they didn't match where we were performance-wise. Now, the high expectations are still there, but we've had consistent performances, certainly over three of the last four tournaments and a quarter-final in the fourth.

"In the end, you have to be in the latter stages of tournaments to learn how to win the big games. A lot of records we have broken, but we know we have to do this one, to get this trophy to really feel the respect of the footballing world."

England endured an underwhelming start in Germany, topping Group C despite winning just one of their three games and scoring just two goals.

Jude Bellingham's stoppage-time strike and Harry Kane's extra-time header rescued them in their last-16 tie against Slovakia, while a penalty shootout was required to see off Switzerland in the quarter-finals.

Southgate switched from a 4-2-3-1 formation to a 3-4-3 in the latter contest, and stuck with that in the semi-finals, where England produced their best performance of the tournament as they saw off the Netherlands thanks to Ollie Watkins' last-gasp winner.

"We've had to find a different way of playing as the tournament progressed," the Three Lions head coach added. 

"We've been trying to find the right blend and balance for our attacking players because we've got super talent, but a lot who like to operate in similar areas.

"We feel we've started to find that balance. We've looked dangerous, like we could score goals again, and I'm happy with where the team were at going into this game."

Jesus Navas confirmed he will retire from international duty following Spain's Euro 2024 final showdown with England on Sunday.

The 38-year-old, who will bring the curtain down on an international career spanning 15 years, is the last remaining member of La Roja's 2010 World Cup and 2012 European Championship-winning sides.

Navas has appeared three times for Spain during this tournament, captaining the side in their final Group B game against Albania, while deputising for the suspended Dani Carvajal at right-back in the semi-final win over France.

The Sevilla wing-back, who will call time on his professional career later this year, admitted he has played through the pain barrier in recent years.

Speaking ahead of Sunday's final, Navas highlighted similarities between Spain's current crop and the side that won three successive major international honours from 2008 to 2012.

Although, he only lifted the lid on his international future following a conversation with skipper Alvaro Morata. 

"[Morata] told me that it was time for me to speak since it is my last game with Spain!" he told reporters during the pre-match press conference.

"I have been having a problem with my hip for four or five years, but playing for my country is everything for me.

"I just want to leave everything on the pitch. You have to die for every moment here, for your team and your country. It is the biggest thing, and I am so proud of that.

"Afterwards, everything hurts, but it is about giving it all you have on the day, to be the same person with the same kind of humility.

"I am excited about everything that I have done in football and in the national team. Being here as a 38-year-old is unique and incredible.

"In those years of success, we were a team both on and off the pitch. That was noticeable when we played, and it is the same here."

Luis de la Fuente says Spain "want to start to make history" when they face England in the Euro 2024 final on Sunday.

La Roja can become the most successful nation in European Championship history outright by lifting the Henri Delaunay cup for a record-breaking fourth time at the Olympiastadion in Berlin.

De la Fuente's side have undoubtedly been the most impressive side during the tournament, winning all six of their matches while scoring 13 goals for the loss of just three.

The 63-year-old is looking to complete a treble of European Championship triumphs, having also won the tournament at under-19 and under-21 levels.

And the head coach paid tribute to his players ahead of this competition's dramatic climax.

"We expect a complicated match because we are two great teams, the best [of the Euros]," he told reporters during his pre-match press conference.

"We are in a great moment, but I believe this will be a very balanced match. It is a final, and in finals, it is the details that define the matches.

"Many of our players have experience in these types of games, and we are approaching the final with peace of mind and pride.

"Reaching the final of a European Championship is a football milestone, and we really want to play this match. I see the player's faces, their spirit. These players have given everything for us.

"It's a brilliant generation, many of them have come through successful youth levels, and that usually bodes well for success.

"The enthusiasm that this team has generated is not something to be taken for granted. They have earned this and worked for it. Seeing a country fully behind this team is something wonderful.

"We want to start to make history - and we have made history already in the run to [the final]. I trust in a great future. There's both present and future."

England are "desperate to go one step further" in their Euro 2024 final against Spain on Sunday, says Harry Kane.

Kane captained the Three Lions team that fell at the final hurdle at Euro 2020, losing to Italy on penalties at Wembley.

Gareth Southgate's team have been far from their best in Germany, almost exiting the competition in the last 16 until Jude Bellingham's spectacular late leveller against Slovakia, while they needed penalties to overcome Switzerland and a last-gasp Ollie Watkins winner to sink the Netherlands.

But Kane praised England's consistency in reaching back-to-back Euros finals, and is desperate to right the wrongs of three years ago. 

"I think it shows unbelievable consistency, first and foremost [to reach another European final]. A lot of us after that final [against Italy] we were obviously heartbroken with the result, as always a long journey back to getting where we are now," Kane said in his pre-match press conference. 

"Full credit to the boys for the resilience that we've shown. It speaks volumes for the mentality of the squad, extremely happy to be in this situation and to be back in a European final. Of course we are really desperate to go one step further than we did last time."

There was more penalty heartbreak at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, though this time in normal time, as Kane skied a spot-kick over the bar in a 2-1 defeat to France.

Kane has experienced hardship both at club and international level, but he pinpointed the Euro 2020 defeat as extra motivation in wanting to lead England to a first major honour since the 1966 World Cup. 

"I think it would mean everything [for the country to win the Euros]," said Kane. "It would be obviously be the most incredible feeling as a professional footballer and I'm sure also for fans to have that moment in history. It would be something very special.

"It was a tough finish in the last Euros so there's an extra hunger and fire in the belly to make sure this one goes our way, but we also know it's going to be an extremely tough night.

"Whenever you lose a final, it's tough to wipe it from the memory. I'm always someone who tries to learn from disappointment and times that are tough. I feel like it improves me as a player and a person.

"Of course, that moment was difficult but it was three years ago and a lot has happened since so I'm excited to be back on that stage, it's been a hard journey to get there and now it's about trying to go out there and execute the game-plan we want.

"We've done fantastic in a lot of tournaments but now it's time to get over the line and we have that opportunity tomorrow."

Coming into the encounter, England have failed to score in three of their four major tournament games against Spain, with the last two meetings both finishing 0-0. 

Their last meeting came in the Nations League, with England winning 3-2 in Seville, though they have not won consecutive games against La Roja since a run of seven between 1960 and 1980. 

"We've prepared well and we'll still have a couple of meetings from now until the game," concluded Kane, who is now the record goalscorer in the knockout stages at the Euros.

"It's going to come down to small details, which we've been able to get right throughout the whole tournament so far. We're going to need that and even more in tomorrow's final."

Gareth Southgate does not believe in fairytales, but the England manager is a firm believer in dreams, so he said on the eve of the Euro 2024 final.

England take on Spain with history on the line in Berlin on Sunday.

Win, and the Three Lions will end a 58-year wait for a second piece of silverware. Spain, on the other hand, could become the first team to win the European Championships on four separate occasions.

England lost to Italy on penalties in the final of Euro 2020 three years ago, and while they have stuttered their way through in Germany, Southgate wants to create a special moment in time.

"I'm not a believer in fairytales, but I am a believer in dreams," he said.

"We've had big dreams and felt the importance of that, but you've got to make those things happen.

"Fate, the late goals we've had, the penalties, that doesn't equate to it being our moment. We've got to make it happen tomorrow.

"It's in our hands, and it's our performance which is the most important thing."

England have made it into the semi-finals of three of the four major tournaments under Southgate.

To get to their second final in three years, they finished top of Group C despite winning only one match, before coming from behind to beat Slovakia and the Netherlands either side of overcoming Switzerland in a penalty shootout.

"We've got good experience of big matches now and I think at these moments you don't need to say too much to the players, they don't need motivating for a game like this - it's about making sure the small details are right as fine margins decide these games and we've got to make sure we're on the right side of them," Southgate added.

"We're excited for the challenge. Clearly the team have improved over the last few weeks, showed tremendous character and resilience - I have to say they have been a pleasure to work with every day on the training pitch.

"It's been a great environment to work in and now we have a fabulous opportunity tomorrow to achieve what we set out really from the moment we left Qatar a bit earlier than we'd have liked.

"I don't have any fear about tomorrow as I've been through everything.

"I want the players to have that fearlessness. If we're not afraid to lose it gives us a better chance of winning."

Southgate will be the third manager to take charge of more than one European Championship final (excluding replays), after Helmut Schon with Germany (1972, 1976) and Berti Vogts with Germany (1992, 1996), with all three doing so in consecutive editions. No coach has ever lost two finals in the competition before.

The Opta supercomputer rates England's chances of success at 28.5%, with Spain the favourites at 40.7%.

Marc Cucurella is hoping that Chelsea teammate Cole Palmer remains on the bench as he laid out his plan to stop Bukayo Saka ahead of Spain's Euro 2024 final against England. 

Palmer is yet to start for Gareth Southgate at the tournament, despite netting 22 goals in 34 Premier League appearances in a turbulent season at Stamford Bridge. 

However, the 22-year-old proved his worth from the bench, teeing up Ollie Watkins' late strike against the Netherlands to secure their place in back-to-back European Championship finals. 

Asked whether he had been in contact with his Chelsea teammate, Cucurella told Mundo Deportivo: “I spoke with him, but it was over a week ago. We talked for a while in the previous rounds.

“For me, it’s much better if he doesn’t play and stays on the bench.”

Having endured a difficult season at club level, Cucurella has starred for La Roja in Germany, starting all but one of their fixtures at the finals. 

Injuries to Jose Gaya and Alejandro Balde resulted in his inclusion in Luis de la Fuente's final 26-man squad. 

Although many expected Bayer Leverkusen's Alex Grimaldo to start at left-back, Cucurella has made that position his own and has been one of the most consistent players at the tournament. 

But when asked by The Athletic if there was an English player he particularly struggled against, Cucurella said: "He has not played a lot at Euro 2024, but it has to be Cole Palmer. 

"His football brain works so quickly, he is always a step ahead of the rest. His decision-making is almost always excellent, and that sort of intelligence is the most difficult thing to defend against, you just can’t predict what he’ll do next. I’ve suffered a lot in training.

"He reminds me a lot of Lamine Yamal. Same style of player. He is a guy who does not care too much about anything. They don’t take life or themselves too seriously.

"If you ran into Palmer in the streets, you would never tell he is a footballer. But then he plays and… oof.

"He arrived at a tough time for Chelsea, when the team was struggling, and he made an impact from the start. That helped him a lot to keep growing and getting more confident. If you manage to get those kinds of players in a situation of confidence, they make the difference.

"I’m so happy and hope he carries on like this… but after this weekend!"

Cucurella is likely to come up against Saka in Berlin should Gareth Southgate stick with the same side that edged past the Netherlands last time out.

The Spaniard knows all too well the threat that Saka possesses, having seen him notch an assist in each of their Premier League encounters last season. 

And Cucurella plans to make Sunday's final as uncomfortable as possible for the Arsenal man. 

"I know how Saka plays. I don’t really need to watch a lot of footage as I normally watch all the Arsenal games," Cucurella said.

"It is so tough to mark him, but those challenges are nice for me. Playing against rivals of such quality is nice, I’m sure we both can’t wait for it. 

"My main target is to make him feel uncomfortable. I also think that the game’s script will depend a lot on Spain and how we play, rather than what England do.

"If we dominate the ball as we’ve done and stay aware of the high pressure and everything we need to do to avoid counter-attacks, we’ll have plenty of chances to win."

Harry Kane insists full focus remains on securing England's first international trophy since 1966 as he prepares to do battle with Spain's Dani Olmo for the Golden Boot in the Euro 2024 final. 

England face Spain in the tournament's showpiece game on Sunday in Berlin having beaten the Netherlands in the semi-finals thanks to Ollie Watkins' late strike. 

Kane levelled the scores in Dortmund from the penalty spot, netting his third goal of the competition and putting him out on his own as the all-time top scorer in knockout games at the European Championships (six). 

He now has more knockout stage goals in major tournaments than any other European player (nine), overtaking Gerd Muller, Miroslav Klose, Antoine Griezmann, and Kylian Mbappe (all eight).

The Three Lions captain currently finds himself in a six-way tie for the Golden Boot, with Spain's Olmo posing the biggest threat. 

Olmo currently holds the edge over Kane, having recorded two assists along with his three goals in Germany for Luis de la Fuente's side. 

Cody Gakpo, Georges Mikautadze, Jamal Musiala and Ivan Schranz all have three goals to their name too. However, they have all exited the competition. 

But Kane insists scooping the Golden Boot will be an added bonus, with full focus on ensuring England lift the Henri Delaunay Cup in Berlin. 

"Ultimately, when you come this far in a tournament, you're not thinking about the golden boot," Kane said.

"You're thinking about winning the championship and that's all that matters.

"So, of course, as a striker I'd love to score on Sunday but if someone else scores and we win, I'm not going to be disappointed."

Kane's wait for a first trophy in his professional career could come to an end in Berlin, having come close in both his domestic and international outings. 

During his time with Tottenham, the striker received three runners-up medals, including one in the Champions League final against Liverpool in 2019. 

His switch to Bayern Munich promised to end that wait, but defeat on his debut in the DFL-Supercup and a third-placed finish in the Bundesliga saw the German club endure their first season without a trophy in 11 years. 

Kane also captained England to the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup, as well as their Euro 2020 final run which ended in defeat to Italy on penalties at Wembley. 

The Three Lions striker admitted the pain of their defeat to the Azzurri brings extra motivation, but confirmed that if England are to end their 58-year wait for an international trophy, it will be down to the team. 

"Everyone wants to achieve the same goal," he concluded.

"And whether you play one minute or you play every minute, if we win it, we're all going to celebrate together and we’re all going to be extremely happy, so that's the most important thing."

Harry Kane insists full focus remains on securing England's first international trophy since 1966 as he prepares to do battle with Spain's Dani Olmo for the Golden Boot in the Euro 2024 final. 

England face Spain in the tournament's showpiece game on Sunday in Berlin having beaten the Netherlands in the semi-finals thanks to Ollie Watkins' late strike. 

Kane levelled the scores in Dortmund from the penalty spot, netting his third goal of the competition and putting him out on his own as the all-time top scorer in knockout games at the European Championships (six). 

He now has more knockout stage goals in major tournaments than any other European player (nine), overtaking Gerd Muller, Miroslav Klose, Antoine Griezmann, and Kylian Mbappe (all eight).

The Three Lions captain currently finds himself in a six-way tie for the Golden Boot, with Spain's Olmo posing the biggest threat. 

Olmo currently holds the edge over Kane, having recorded two assists along with his three goals in Germany for Luis de la Fuente's side. 

Cody Gakpo, Georges Mikautadze, Jamal Musiala and Ivan Schranz all have three goals to their name too. However, they have all exited the competition. 

However, Kane insists scooping the Golden Boot will be an added bonus, with full focus on ensuring England lift the Henri Delaunay Cup in Berlin. 

"Ultimately, when you come this far in a tournament, you're not thinking about the golden boot," Kane said.

"You're thinking about winning the championship and that's all that matters.

"So, of course, as a striker I'd love to score on Sunday but if someone else scores and we win, I'm not going to be disappointed."

Kane's wait for a first trophy in his professional career could come to an end in Berlin, having come close in both his domestic and international outings. 

During his time with Tottenham, the striker received three runners-up medals, including one in the Champions League final against Liverpool in 2019. 

His switch to Bayern Munich promised to end that wait, but defeat on his debut in the DFL-Supercup and a third-placed finish in the league saw the German club endure their first season without a trophy in 11 years. 

Kane also captained England to the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup, as well as their European Championship final run which ended in defeat to Italy on penalties. 

The Three Lions striker admitted the pain of their defeat to the Azzurri brings extra motivation, but confirmed that if England are to end their 58-year wait for an international trophy, it will be down to the team. 

"Everyone wants to achieve the same goal," he concluded.

"And whether you play one minute or you play every minute, if we win it, we're all going to celebrate together and we’re all going to be extremely happy, so that's the most important thing."

Declan Rice lauded praise on England midfield partner Kobbie Mainoo for his leadership qualities during his run in the side at Euro 2024. 

Mainoo has started alongside Rice in the Three Lions' three knockout games against Slovakia, Switzerland and the Netherlands. 

The Manchester United midfielder, who enjoyed a breakthrough season under Erik ten Hag, made history in England's semi-final win over Ronald Koeman's side. 

At 19 years and 82 days, Mainoo became the youngest player to play for England in the semi-final of a major tournament.

Mainoo received the man of the match award, starring in midfield as he made more tackles (two) and interceptions (two) than any other Three Lions player in Dortmund. 

"You can just see. You speak to him and just feel his calm presence that he has and what I like about him is that he is not scared to say it how it is," said Rice.

"There was something towards the end [against the Netherlands] when he gave me a pass between the lines and I got sold short for it.

"We had to sprint back and we had bit at each other - but that is good because you need that relationship. At 19, I can't imagine many saying that to older players and that's what I love about him.

"That is what the lads love about him as well. He gets that respect, he has that leadership and the way he takes the ball and is comfortable.

"The conversations we've been having daily with each other and on the training pitch have brought us together, and we have become a nice partnership."

Rice has had another influential tournament with England, having played a major role in Gareth Southgate's side in their run to the delayed Euro 2020 final against Italy.

In Germany, the Arsenal midfielder has had more touches (300) and completed more passes (236) while under high pressure than any other player at the tournament.

He’s also made seven line breaking passes that have led to a shot within 10 seconds, more than any other England player, showcasing his ability in the forward areas. 

Rice was previously partnered with Trent Alexander-Arnold and Conor Gallagher during the group games at the tournament but insists he has found a nice balance with Mainoo ahead of their meeting with Spain on Sunday.

"I think when you're playing with a midfield partner, you need to understand each other's game. You need to play close to each other.

"That's why you see us playing a couple of little passes to each other in games. You know, those little first pass connections are so important. And we've been working really well together on the training pitch.

"So this boy is going to go on to be massive. He's destined for great things. And what I love about him as well is that he isn't big-headed. He's got a great family around him. You see his family in the stands after the game. They're so happy, smiley, speak to people. 

"Man United have got a top player on their hands for the next decade, I'm sure."

Gareth Southgate says he would find it "impossible to make a logical decision" on his England future before the Euro 2024 final.

The Three Lions are playing in the showpiece for the second consecutive Euros on Sunday, with Spain standing in the way of them winning their first major tournament in 58 years.

Under Southgate, England have reached at least the semi-finals in three of their four major tournaments, only failing to do so at the 2022 World Cup, when they were beaten by eventual finalists France in the last eight.

The manager's current contract runs out in December, with his uncertain future causing a lot of speculation.

"Emotionally, it would be impossible for me to make a logical decision at the moment on any of that because my sole focus for two years has been winning this tournament," Southgate told a group of reporters.

"The last five or six weeks have been an absolute rollercoaster, so I don't actually know where I am with anything other than being very focused on preparing the team for this game.

"I'm determined to keep leading them in the way I have over the last month.

"I definitely took the job to try and help English football improve. I know what it would mean, not only to the general public in England but particularly people involved in English football, from those that develop young players to those that run clubs, every level of the game, really.

"We've improved the credibility of English football in how it's perceived around the world but, ultimately, until you win that trophy then there will always be those questions both abroad and at home about what we've done."

Declan Rice wants to take inspiration from the Lionesses' European Championships success when England face Spain in the Euro 2024 final on Sunday.

England's women won their first major trophy at Euro 2022, dramatically beating Germany 2-1 in extra time to earn the country's first title since the men won the 1966 World Cup.

The Three Lions had come close to ending the trophy drought themselves the year before but lost on penalties to Italy in the delayed Euro 2020 final.

Having reached the final for the second consecutive Euros, Rice is aiming to build on the legacy created by the Lionesses.

"Yeah, it would mean everything I think to win something for your country,” Rice said.

"We saw when the women's team won it, what it meant to them and what it meant to the nation. I'm lucky enough now to see a lot of the girls who are in the Arsenal squad and to this day they still speak about it.

"You know that's what we want now as a men's team, you know we want it. We want to win; we want to make the nation proud. We want to make the fans proud.

"And it's a chance to create our own little bit of history. So yeah, look, we're ready. But like I said, it's another game of football and may the best team win."

As well as reaching the final in both European Championships under Gareth Southgate, England also reached the semi-finals and quarter-finals of the World Cups in 2018 and 2022 respectively.

However, the manager had come under criticism at the tournament in the early stages after lacklustre performances from the side, especially in the group stages.

"I can't speak highly enough of Gareth," Rice added. "I think he deserves it more than anyone.

"I think the England manager's job is probably one of the most scrutinised jobs in the world, but you look at what he's done for us in tournaments.

"Obviously, after the group games it was tough, the boos, people chucking stuff on the pitch, you have to see that, and you have to be calm in those moments.

"For him as the manager, he has to be calm and the way he still reacted with us after that, how calm he was, even though if he would have been feeling a different way, it still made us feel really calm. And we always still had a vision and a belief that we could go and do special things.

"Now we're feeling that love, that confidence, and we can't thank everyone enough for that and, yeah, just keep with us one more game. And, hopefully, we can do something special and give memories to you all for forever."

Lamine Yamal says his family hid the now-viral photos of him as a baby with Lionel Messi to avoid drawing comparisons between the two players.

Photos from 2007, which were part of a charity calendar, surfaced earlier this month, showing Messi bathing a six-month-old Yamal alongside the youngster's mother.

After an explosive start to his Barcelona career at just 15, the winger drew comparisons to the Argentinian as a left-footed winger on the right.

However, Yamal revealed the photos had been kept out of the limelight in a bid to avoid that kind of talk.

"Obviously, in the moment the photos were taken, I wasn't conscious of what was going on at that age," Yamal told Jijantes on Friday.

"My dad had the photos saved, and they never came out, basically because we didn't want comparisons with Messi.

"No one would be annoyed to be compared with the best to ever play the game, but it's something that could work against you because you're never going to be like him."

Yamal is currently preparing for the Euro 2024 final with Spain, having broken records throughout the tournament.

In their semi-final victory, the teenager became the youngest-ever goalscorer at a major tournament at 16 years and 362 days.

Spain will face England in the final on Sunday in Berlin.

Ollie Watkins labelled Spain's Lamine Yamal as a "generational talent" ahead of England's clash with La Roja in the Euro 2024 final on Sunday. 

Yamal played a key role in Spain reaching their first major tournament final since 2012, scoring a stunner to cancel out Randal Kolo Muani's opener before Dani Olmo's winner four minutes later. 

The teenager has had 13 shot involvements following a ball carry at Euro 2024 (six shots, seven chances created), at least three more than any other player.

Having beaten Pele's record in becoming the youngest player to score at a major tournament, more history beckons for Yamal in Berlin. 

A day after his 17th birthday, the Barcelona forward could be the youngest player to feature in a World Cup or European Championship final, again, beating Pele's record from the 1958 World Cup (17y 249d).

“Everyone's seen what he can do. It's not often that you are scoring a goal against France in the top corner in the semi-final of the Euros when you're 16," Watkins said.

"He’s got the world at his feet and is miles ahead of me when I was 16 or 17.”

England left it late to secure their place in their first major tournament final on foreign soil, with Watkins striking the deciding blow against the Netherlands. 

The Three Lions' hopes of reaching back-to-back European Championship finals were dented early on when Xavi Simons fired beyond Jordan Pickford from distance. 

However, Harry Kane levelled from the spot, before Watkins emerged from the bench to fire Gareth Southgate's side into the tournament's showpiece game. 

Watkins was under no illusions about the difficulty awaiting his side in Berlin, acknowledging Spain's run to the final where they have beaten Italy, Germany and France.

“They’ve had to come through a harder journey than us playing against Italy, Germany and France - the so-called bigger teams - and I feel like they have been probably the best team of the competition so far," he said.

“The wingers for Spain are very dynamic, young, full of confidence and direct but also across our team, we have goals from everywhere and world class talent, so it's going to be a very exciting match.

"I can't wait to watch it and be a part of it. And hopefully we can get the get the job done."

Like many England fans, Watkins has had his fourth international goal from their semi-final win over the Netherlands on repeat. 

"I watched it quite a few times, when I got back to camp," said Watkins. "I was manifesting it, a lot has led up to it.

"A good friend said he felt like I would score in the Euros final, I did it a match before, but you never know, I might be saving another one for the final."

Carlos Alcaraz is confident that Sunday will be a good day for the people of Spain as he prepares to defend his Wimbledon crown. 

Alcaraz became just the second Spaniard after Rafael Nadal to reach multiple singles finals at Wimbledon following his 6-7 (1-7) 6-3 6-4 6-4 win on Centre Court. 

The 21-year-old's match against either Novak Djokovic will take place hours before Spain face England in the Euro 2024 final in Berlin. 

"I feel like I am not new anymore. I know how I feel before the final I have been in this position before - I will try to do the things that I didn't do last year and be better," Alcaraz told Annabel Croft in his post-match interview. 

"I will also try the things that went well - it will be a good day for Spanish people as well!"

The world number three went on to jokingly reference the European Championship final, saying: "I didn't say Spain was going to win."

But Alcaraz's quest for a fourth grand slam title was anything but straightforward, coming from a set down to edge a classic against Medvedev.

In a game that saw nine break points converted (Alcaraz six, Medvedev three), Alcaraz acknowledged the difficulties he faced in SW19. 

"I tried to play long rallies and tried to play to the net as much as I can. I tried to not play his game," Alcaraz said. 

"There were a few points that were really long rallies, but I tried to put my own game [on the match]. It was difficult to break the wall!

"Different conditions, but happy with my performance today. He was dominating the match and playing great tennis with his serves. It was difficult for me and he tried to pull out all the shots."

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