Bahamian sprint hurdler Devynne Charlton dazzled at the World Athletics Indoor Tour Gold meeting in Madrid, coming within a hair's breadth of equaling her own world indoor 60m hurdles record. The impressive performances unfolded on Friday as athletes geared up for the impending World Athletics Indoor Championships in Glasgow.

 Two-time European indoor champion Nadine Visser set the tone with a 7.79-second victory in the first 60m hurdles heat, equaling the meeting record. Charlton seamlessly matched this time in the second heat, visibly easing down toward the end of the race. The Bahamian sprinter then took center stage in the final race of the evening, showcasing her prowess.

 Devynne Charlton's flawless performance saw her gracefully navigate the hurdles, ultimately crossing the line in 7.68 seconds. Although slightly adjusted from an initial 7.67, this remarkable time stands as the equal third-fastest in history and set a new meeting record. Nadine Visser secured second place in 7.78, just 0.01 seconds shy of her personal best, while Pia Skrzysowska claimed third in 7.83.

 Expressing her joy, Charlton said, "I set myself all of these goals. I said I wanted to win the World Indoor Tour and break the world indoor record and I want to be a world indoor champion, so I’m just ticking all of the boxes. There’s just one more to go. If this is any preview to the World Indoors, then I’d say I’m on the right track. I’m having fun."

 In the men's shot put, Jamaican athlete Rajindra Campbell delivered a stunning performance, saving his best for last. While two-time world indoor champion Tom Walsh initially seized the lead with a 21.44m heave, Campbell responded with a 21.75m throw in round three. Walsh counteracted with a meeting record of 21.95m in round four.

 In a dramatic turn of events, Campbell, competing in the city where he set an outdoor Jamaican record last year, unleashed a colossal 22.16m throw in his final attempt. This not only secured his victory but also established a new meeting record and a Jamaican indoor record. Walsh concluded with a season's best of 22.02m, earning just enough points in the World Indoor Tour to clinch the series title, despite falling short of individual victory.

Newly-minted World record holder for the women’s 60 metres hurdles, Devynne Charlton, headlines a six-member team selected by The Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) to represent the island at the upcoming World Athletics Indoor Championships in Glasgow, Scotland.

Anthonique Strachan, Charisma Taylor, Ken Mullings, LaQuan Nairn and Alonzo Russell, are the others that will fly the Bahamian flag at the event scheduled for March 1-3.

Charlton is overwhelmingly favoured for the gold, given her smashing world record run of 7.67 seconds during the 116th running of the Millrose Games at the Nike Track and Field Center in New York City, last Sunday.

In addition to Charlton’s pursuit of global gold, Strachan will go after a medal in the women’s 60m, Taylor will contest two events – the women’s triple jump and she will join Charlton in the hurdles. Mullings will try his hand in the men’s indoor heptathlon, with Nairn set to soar in the men’s long jump, while Russell will compete in the men’s 400m.

Veteran high jumper Donald Thomas could be added to the team, pending an invitation from World Athletics.

Demarius Cash, who will serve as head coach/manager of a major senior team for the first time, has high expectations.

“Based on what Devynne was able to do on Sunday, a lot of the athletes are excited and ready to go. There is nothing like when one of your colleagues does something special like this and running a world record is as exciting as it comes in track and field,” Cash said.

“What Devynne did, speaks volumes for where we are in track and field as a nation. This is a very exciting time for us, and I believe Bahamians will be pleased by the performances of these athletes at the world indoors. I believe we could bring home some hardware,” he added.

Russell, who was a part of the silver medal winning 4x400m relay team at the 2016 Championships, and Charlton, who won silver in the women’s 60m hurdles in Belgrade, two years ago, are the only World Indoor medallists on the team.

However, Charlton is not the only world leader on the team. Mullings has a world leading mark of 6,340 points in the indoor heptathlon. He scored that national record at the Illini Challenge at the University of Illinois in Champaign, in January.

“This would be the first time that we would have had an athlete going into the World Indoor Championships as the world leader in the multi events. This is great for Ken and it’s going to be a good challenge for him. I believe he will step up to the plate and do well,” said Cash.

The team will no doubt be led by Charlton though. Cash said she appears to be in the right frame of mind, and shape, to win gold this time around.

“She’s a special athlete and I believe there is a lot more in store for her this season. From the management side, I’m ready for the challenge. I’m here to work for the athletes and make sure they are prepared for everything.

“I believe this is going to be a high intensity meet for The Bahamas. I just want to thank the BAAA, and the executive team of the BAAA, for the opportunity to serve as head coach and manager. I’m looking forward to the challenge,” Cash ended.

Following her electrifying run that resulted in a new world record at the Millrose Games in New York on Sunday, Bahamian sprint hurdler Devynne Charlton is poised to rewrite the record books again, perhaps as early as next month at the World Indoor Championships in Glasgow, Scotland.’

Charlton stunned the sellout crowd at the Millrose Games with a jaw-dropping time of 7.67 seconds that shattered the previous world record of 7.68 seconds set by Sweden's Susanna Kallur back in 2008.

In a post-race interview, Charlton said she wasn’t surprised at the time she ran, indicating that training has been going really well. Rolando ‘Ronnie’ Greene, the Head Track Coach at the University of Kentucky and mastermind behind Charlton's remarkable journey, was also not surprised by the performance revealing that she ran that all-time best while still having the effects of heavy training in her legs.

"It was not a surprise at all. I told her and her training mate, Masai Russell; I said to them, one of you going to break the world record, you have to decide which one is going to do that,” he emphasized, highlighting the rigorous training and unwavering dedication that paved the way for Charlton's historic performance. "Just the things she's been doing in practice; the numbers she's been putting up... I knew the world record was going to fall,” said Greene, who has seen Charlton produce times of 7.88, 7.82, 7.75 and 7.76 heading into New York on Sunday.

“The only thing that we did differently (last week) was I didn't let her pull sled. That's the only thing we did, everything else remain the same. Normally on Mondays we would do some contrast work where we're pulling sleds for four to six times 40 metres with 90 seconds recovery. That's the only thing I took off the plate before this past week before she went to New York. Everything else remained the same, the same amount of volume, the same amount of hurdling.”

He said he made a few tweaks to her technique after her run in Boston the week before she ran on Sunday.

Greene, who has coached Charlton ever since she was standout athlete at Purdue University and who has now given him his first world record, told Sportsmax.TV that she has been racking up scary numbers in training all season.

She's stronger, she's lighter, she's doing things that she's never done. The power to weight ratio in terms of her body weight to what she's cleaning, to what she's squatting is through the ceiling right now. Devynne is five feet, three, 3 1/2 inches. She was 126 lbs last year, she's now 119. She paralleled 325 lbs in a squat and she pulled right at 200 lbs in a clean, so that's almost doubling her body weight. However, you want to put it is much greater, she's never been able to do that before.”

These startling numbers are among the reasons why he feels she will be even faster when she lines up in the 60m hurdles next month.

“We'll do a small taper for Glasgow, I think. People will say, you're not saying this, but I believe she can she can threaten the world record. I think she's got another half a 10th in there or something.”

With the Olympic Games in Paris less than six months away, Greene also believes that this is the year when Charlton should be among the medals, if not at the very top of the podium. She was seventh at the Olympic Games in Tokyo and seventh at the World Championships in Oregon a year later.

In Budapest in 2023, she came closest to a place on the podium when she finished fourth. This time, things are likely to be a lot different. "I truly believe that she is going to be a major factor going forward. She is at that right age of 27/28 when I think athletes hit their peak, their prime, she is at that point,” Greene opined.

“In life, there is a timing that God releases in our lives to accomplish things when we stay the course and I think this is that timing.”

He revealed that when she finished fourth in Budapest last year, in her disappointment, she told him she wished she hadn’t come so close. “She said I wish I was sixth and I said ‘no, baby girl, the devil is alive. You got fourth it just wasn’t your time and when that time arrives, no one can stop it. Nothing or no one can stop it.”

Charlton will race next in Madrid before returning to her training base for a few days of training before they depart for Glasgow.

 

 

Bahamian Devynne Charlton was not surprised by her record-breaking performance in the women’s 60m hurdles at the 2024 Millrose Games in New York on Sunday.

The 2022 World Indoor Championships silver medallist produced a stunning 7.67 to win and establish a new world record in the event, breaking the previous mark of 7.68 done back in 2008 by Sweden’s Susanna Kallur in Germany.

“I knew it was in me. I knew the type of numbers I’ve been putting up in practice but it was all about just executing it,” said the 2022 Commonwealth Games silver medallist in a post-race interview.

Charlton, who is currently training in Lexington, Kentucky and being coached by Rolando “Lonnie” Greene, has been in sensational form to start her 2024 indoor season. The 28-year-old produced 7.88 to win at the UK Rod McCrary Memorial on January 13 before, eight days later, running 7.75 for victory at the Corky Classic.

She then produced 7.76 to win at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix in Boston on February 4. She credited the race at the Corky Classic as the one that made her know she was in world record shape.

“I think early on we were just trying to see where we were at and get an idea of what was going on,” she said.

“After my second meet when I ran 7.75, I went to my coach and said that was a sloppy race and so I knew once we went back and started working on it, this race would show up. I thought I could’ve got it in Boston but once I didn’t get it so once I went back to practice, the focus was on executing that perfect race,” she added.

 The main difference between her races in Boston and New York, according to Charlton, was being more “locked in.”

“All I was thinking about was just executing the start. I did that and it was just a blur. I knew I crossed the line first,” she said.

“I was anticipating the time and I thought I heard him say world record and didn’t really catch it until everyone got so excited, started to embrace me and started jumping up and down so I thought I must’ve done something special. It didn’t really hit me until they brought me around to the clock and I saw my name and world record,” added Charlton.

She said the thought of breaking the world indoor record has been on her mind for a long time but, after her performance at the 2023 World Championships in Budapest, it became her main focus coming into 2024.

She got to the final of the 100m hurdles in Budapest but just missed out on a medal, finishing fourth in 12.52.

“At the World Championships when I finished fourth place, just outside of a medal, it was a really disappointing feeling and one of the first things I said to my coach when I went back to the warm-up area was now I have to break the world record indoor,” she said.

“This has been a goal for a while but that moment was when we really put a plan in place. We went back and looked at everything I did indoor and outdoor last year, focused on my weak points and built on that in practice,” she added.

As for when fans can expect to see Charlton in action again, “we’re going to stick to the plan. Madrid in two weeks and the World Championships in three,” was her response.

 

In a display of explosive speed and flawless execution Bahamian Devynne Charlton set a new world record in the 60m hurdles at the 2024 Millrose Games in New York on Sunday.

Racing against a stacked field that included world champion Danielle Williams and former world leader Tia Jones and last season’s NCAA 100m hurdles champion Ackera Nugent, Charlton exploded from the blocks and surged to the lead early. She flashed across the line in an astonishing 7.67 a new world record and national record. She broke the previous record of 7.68 held by Sweden's Susanna Kallur since 2008.

Williams, whose focus is on the Paris Olympics this summer, ran a season-best 7.79 for second place with Jones clocking the same time for third.

Nugent also ran a season-best 7.80 for fourth place in the keenly contested event.

Olympic bronze medalist Megan Tapper was seventh in a personal best 7.98.

 

 Carey McLeod and Akeem Blake showcased their exceptional athletic abilities at the New Balance Invitational in Boston on Sunday, delivering standout performances in their respective events.

 In the long jump competition, Carey McLeod soared to a season-best mark of 8.20m, securing victory against a highly competitive field. This remarkable feat came shortly after his training partner Wayne Pinnock set a world-leading mark of 8.34m in New Mexico just a couple of days prior. The talented field included Jacob Fincham Dukes of Great Britain, who claimed second place with an impressive 8.02m jump, and Juvaughn Harrison, a multi-talented jumper who secured third place with a leap of 7.87m.

 Akeem Blake, while not claiming the top spot in his event, delivered a lifetime-best performance in the men's 60m. In a tightly contested race, Blake finished second, crossing the line in an indoor lifetime best 6.45. The victory went to American superstar Noah Lyles, who clocked a lifetime-best time of 6.44 which was also a meet record and world-leading performance.

 In the women's 60m hurdles, the competition was intense and thrilling, featuring 2022 world champion Tobi Amusan, Devynne Charlton of the Bahamas, and Tia Jones of the USA. Tia Jones emerged victorious with a lifetime-best and world-leading time of 7.72, showcasing her sprinting prowess. Amusan lowered her national record set in Kazakhstan a week ago, finishing second with a time of 7.75. Charlton closely followed, just outside her own national record, securing third place with a time of 7.76.

 Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper also participated, finishing seventh with a season's best time of 8.02.

 

 

 

 

Bahamian World Indoor Championships 60m hurdles silver medallist Devynne Charlton gave an early indicator into her form this season with a personal best and national record 7.75 to win at the Corky Classic at the Sports Performance Center in Lubbock, Texas on Saturday.

Charlton, who also took 100m hurdles silver at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, won ahead of Americans Tia Jones (7.80) and Masai Russell (7.88).

She also took the 60m hurdles at the UK Rod McCravy Memorial in Louisville in 7.88 on January 13.

Elsewhere on the track, Jamaican Texas Tech sophomore and former Wolmer’s Boys and Kingston College standout Shaemar Uter ran 46.04 for second in the men’s 400m behind Oklahoma senior Zarik Brown (46.03). Dubem Nwachukwu, running unattached, was third in 46.30.

In the field, Kentucky junior Luke Brown jumped 16.80m to win the men’s triple jump ahead of Miami’s Russell Robinson (16.59m) and Texas Tech’s Garison Breeding (15.82m).

Ralford Mullings threw 18.58m for top spot in the men’s shot put ahead of Baylor’s Gary Moore (18.20m) and Miami’s Milton Ingraham (18.07m).

Bahamian Olympic and World Championship 100m hurdles finalist Devynne Charlton opened her 2024 season with a 60m hurdles win at the UK Rod McCravy Memorial in Louisville on January 12 and 13.

Charlton, who took 60m hurdles silver at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade in 2022, won the event in 7.88 on Saturday ahead of Masai Russell (7.89) and UCF senior Rayniah Jones (8.09).

This was after she produced times of 7.99 in the heats and 7.98 in the semi-finals.

Charlton, who also won 100m hurdles silver at the 2022 Commonwealth games in Birmingham, also ran one heat of the 60m, running 7.38 to win heat eight.

Two-time World 100m hurdles champion Danielle Williams headlines a star-studded field assembled for the 60m hurdles at the Millrose Games set for February 11 in New York.

Williams shocked the world by winning her second World title last August with a 12.43 effort in Budapest.

She will be joined by countrywoman Ackera Nugent and fellow Caribbean star Devynne Charlton in the eight-woman field.

Nugent, who finished fifth at the World Championships in Budapest, dominated both the indoor and outdoor NCAA circuits last season.

She claimed the 60m hurdles title at the NCAA Indoor Championships in New Mexico in March with a brilliant 7.73 second effort, this after running a national record 7.72 in the semi-finals.

She followed that up with 100m hurdles gold at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in Texas in June with a wind-aided 12.25.

Charlton is also well-credentialed both indoors and outdoors. She was a finalist in the 100m hurdles at the World Championships in Budapest, finishing sixth.

In 2022, she won silver in the 60m hurdles at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade, Serbia. That same year, she also took silver in the 100m hurdles at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham.

Also in the mix will be former World 100m hurdles record holder Keni Harrison, two-time World Indoor champion Nia Ali as well as Tia Jones, Alaysha Johnson and Masai Russell.

 

Jamaica’s Ackera Nugent and Danielle Williams, as well as Bahamian Devynne Charlton secured their spot in the women’s 100 metres hurdles final, after safely navigating their respective semi-finals on Wednesday’s fifth day of the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

While it was unbridled joy for those three, it was heartbreak for another Jamaican Megan Tapper, as the Olympic medallist placed fourth and her time was not good enough to see her through to tomorrow’s final scheduled for 2:25pm Jamaica time.

Charlton and Tapper both ran from semi-final one, where they placed second and fourth respectively. Charlton, 27, secured the second automatic qualifying spot in 12.49s, behind American Kendra Harrison, who won in 12.33s.

Despite running her heart out, Tapper (12.55s) was out dipped by Switzerland’s Ditaji Kambundji (12.50s), who progressed to tomorrow’s final as one of the two fastest qualifiers on time ahead of the Jamaican.

The second semi-final was just an exciting with Ackera Nugent leading for most of the way but was pipped on the line by Nigeria’s World Record holder Tobi Amusan. Nugent stopped the clock in 12.60s, behind Amusan’s 12.56s.

The last of the three semi-finals saw Jamaica’s former World Champion Danielle Williams off to a blistering start, but she lost her composure close to the end and had to settle for third in a season’s best 12.50s. Fortunately, for her the time was good enough to progress to the final.

Puerto Rico’s Jasmine Camacho-Quinn produced a late burst to win in 21.41s, with American Nia Ali (12.49s), just bettering Williams on the line.

 

You can catch live action of the 2023 World Athletic Championships by downloading the Sportsmax App.

Ackera Nugent, Devynne Charlton, Danielle Williams and Megan Tapper all progressed to the semi-finals of the 100m hurdles on day four of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Tuesday.

Nugent, the NCAA Indoor and Outdoor Champion, was first up in heat one, producing 12.60 to narrowly win ahead of American Masai Russell who was credited with the same time. Ireland’s Sarah Lavin (12.69) and France’s Cyrena Samba-Mayela (12.71) completed the top four.

2019 World Champion, Nia Ali, ran 12.55 to win the second heat ahead of Poland’s Pia Skrzyszowska (12.65), South Africa’s Marione Fourie (12.71) and Hungary’s Luca Kozak (12.71).

2015 World Champion Danielle Williams and 2022 World Indoor Champion Devynne Charlton both lined up in heat three. Charlton and Williams were second and third with 12.44, a new Bahamian national record, and 12.51, respectively, as the race was won by American former world record holder in a blistering 12.24. Great Britain’s Cindy Sember was fourth in 12.83.

Puerto Rico’s Olympic Champion, Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, was next up in heat four. She continued her unbeaten run this season with 12.50 to comfortably win the heat ahead of the Netherlands’ Nadine Visser (12.68) and Switzerland’s Ditaji Kambundji (12.71). Celeste Mucci of Australia also made it through with 12.90 in fourth.

Jamaican national champion, Megan Tapper, finished second in the fifth and final heat in 12.51 to advance. Nigerian World Champion and world record holder Tobi Amusan ran 12.49 to win the heat while Australia’s Michelle Jenneke and Cyprus’ Natalia Christofi ran 12.71 and 12.90 in third and fourth, respectively.

Jereem Richards and Devynne Charlton won their respective events in some style at the 2023 Millrose Games at the Nike Track and Field Centre at the Armory in New York on Saturday.

Richards, Trinidad and Tobago’s reigning world indoor champion, rebounded from his narrow loss at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix last week when he ran 45.88, to win in a season-best 45.84.

The Trinidadian was in command from the gun and created daylight between himself and the USA’s Noah Williams, who was second in 46.20.

It was the American who edged Richards over 400m in Boston last week.

Third was the USA’s Bryce Deadmon who ran 46.34.

The Bahamian champion Charlton’s good form this season, continued Saturday in New York where she ran 7.91 to win a close race with the USA duo of Tonea Marshall, who clocked a season best 7.94 and veteran Sharika Nelvis, who finished third in 7.96.

Following his mediocre season last year after his two-year suspension for whereabouts rules violations, 60 world-record holder Christian Coleman signaled a return to form winning the 60m dash in 6.47.

It was supposed to be a clash between him and Noah Lyles who ran a personal best 6.51 in Boston last week. However, the latter was disqualified for a false start and that opened the door for Jamaica’s Traves Williams of the University at Albany, who ran a lifetime best of 6.59 for second.

Josephus Lyles was given the same time but awarded third.

Aleia Hobbs, meanwhile, notched another win on her belt with a 7.04 run to win the women’s race ahead of Tamari Davis (7.08) and Mary Beth Sant-Price (7.11).

 

 

 

Devynne Charlton was the only Caribbean athlete to win an event but several others were on the podium at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix at The Track at New Balance in Boston on Saturday.

The 27-year-old Bahamian, who won silver at the 2022 World Indoor Championships, clocked a season-best 7.87 whole holding off the challenge of Sharika Nelvis of the USA (7.93) and Celeste Mucci of Australia, who ran a personal best of 7.95.

Jamaica’s Danielle Williams ran 7.97 for fourth in the keenly contested battle for the minor place.

Meanwhile, 2022 World Indoor 400m champion Jereem Richards was nipped on the line by Noah Williams of the USA in a tight three-way finish.

The Trinidadian led most of the way but tightened up over the last 50m when Williams jumped at the chance to get past him on the inside to take the race by 0.04s.

Both were given the same time of 45.88. However, on closer inspection, Williams clocked 45.876 to Richards’ 45.880.

Vernon Norwood finished third in 45.92.

Jamaican’s Leah Anderson and Janieve Russell finished second and third, respectively, in the Women’s 500m in which Fembke Bol unleashed a new world’s best performance.

The Dutch athlete, who won silver in the 400m hurdles in Oregon in 2022, demonstrated superior speed and strength to pull away from the field and win in 1:05.63 to become the first woman to run faster than 1:06.00 in the event.

It was a new personal best, national record and world record.

Anderson made a late surge to get by Russell in the final stages to establish a new Jamaican national record of 1:08.34.

Russell, the now two-time Commonwealth Games 400m hurdles champion, faded to third in 1:09.18.

The Women’s 60m dash was billed as a clash between World 200m champion Shericka Jackson of Jamaica and World and Olympic 400m hurdles champion Sydney McLaughlin-Levrone.

Somebody forgot about Aleia Hobbs, who just last week ran 6.98 over 60m, tied for the ninth fastest time ever with Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson-Herah.

But while both Jackson and McLaughlin-Levrone failed to make the final finishing fifth in the respective heats, Hobbs dominated the field to take the final in 7.02 ahead of training partner Mikiah Brisco, who ran a season best 7.10.

Celera Barnes ran 7.21 for third in the American sweep.

Noah Lyles edged Trayvon Brommel by the smallest of margins to win the men’s event in a personal best 6.51 (6.507). Brommel 6.51 (6.509) took the runner-up spot.

Ghana’s Benjamin Azamati clocked 6.62 for third.

 

Rushell Clayton and Foirdaliza Cofil won their respective events at the Hanzekovic Memorial Meeting in Zagreb, Croatia on Sunday.

2020 Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper and 2022 World Indoor silver medallist Devynne Charlton both advanced to the final of the Women’s 100m hurdles at the NACAC Open Championships in Freeport, the Bahamas on Friday.

Jamaica’s Tapper qualified fastest with a 12.62 effort to win semi-final one while Charlton of the Bahamas finished second in the second semi-final in 12.76 to advance. Puerto Rico’s Paola Vazquez (13.34) and Cuba’s Acevedo Lopez (13.43) also advanced to the final.

Costa Rica’s Gerald Drummond (49.68), BVI’s Kyron McMaster (49.77), Jamaica’s Shawn Rowe (50.27), Cuba’s Lazaro Fernandez (50.37), The Bahamas’ Shakeem Smith (50.55) and Haiti’s Joshua Adhemar (52.21) all advanced to the final of the 400m hurdles.

In the 200m, Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte (22.78) and Ashley Williams (23.67) both advanced to the Women’s final along with The Bahamas’ Tynia Gaither (22.82), Trinidad & Tobago’s Mauricia Prieto (23.48) and Reyare Thomas (24.00) and Grenada’s Amanda Crawford (24.32).

On the Men’s side, Jamaica’s Andrew Hudson was the fastest qualifier to the final with 20.25. He’ll be joined in the event by teammate Jazeel Murphy (20.80), Trinidad & Tobago’s Kyle Greaux (20.68), The Bahamas’ Ian Kerr (20.89), Antigua & Barbuda’s Darrion Skerritt (21.17) and Bermuda’s Suresh Black (21.42).

In the field, Jamaica’s O’Dayne Richards threw 20.05m for bronze in the men’s shot put behind Americans Roger Steen (20.78m) and Adrian Piperi (20.76m).

The region also got silver and bronze in the men’s triple jump thanks to Bermuda’s Jah Nhai Perinchief (15.89m) and Antigua & Barbuda’s Taeco O’Garro (15.70m). Gold went to the USA’s Chris Bernard with 16.40m.

 

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