Citing the presence of the BVI Olympic Committee and financial support from a shoe sponsor in PUMA, Steve Augustine, President of the British Virgin Island Athletics Association (BVIAA) is not overly concerned about the possibility of athletes from his country switching allegiance to represent the United Kingdom in international competition.

Augustine was speaking recently on the online Talk Sports show with Michael Bascombe in the wake of the success the BVI enjoyed at the recent 49th edition of the Carifta Games held at the National Stadium in Kingston, Jamaica.

At the Games held from April 16-18, the BVI won four gold medals, two silver and a bronze for one of their best-ever medal hauls. Three of those gold medals were won by the imperious 16-year-old Adaejah Hodge, who was voted the winner of the coveted Austin Sealy Award.

But as is the case with many small island nations, there have been occasions when athletes choose to transfer allegiance to other countries in search of greater stability and support. In the recent past, Olympian Miguel Francis, who was born in Montserrat and resided in Antigua, chose to represent the United Kingdom in international competition.

Augustine said while the issue has surfaced in recent conversations with colleagues, he is not overly concerned.

“It’s something that we have spoken about at a high level, at the association level but we have never had to face that battle,” said Augustine, whose islands boast two of the best athletes in the world – Kyron McMaster and Chantal Malone – in the 400m hurdles and long jump respectively and who still represent the BVI in international competition.

“One of the good things about the BVI is that we have an Olympic Committee existing on the island, the BVI Olympic Committee. There are other territories that are under the umbrella of the United Kingdom that do not and for them, that becomes the obvious option to perhaps leave their home countries and compete for the United Kingdom.

“It’s not something that we have paid much attention to. It is indeed an option of athlete wants to do that, there is a process through World Athletics, you can’t just jump up and compete for the UK tomorrow, there is a process.”

That said, Augustine believes the BVIAA treats its athletes well which in all likelihood makes them want to remain at home.

“We were super happy a few years to be sponsored by PUMA, so our athletes are well geared. They look really nice in their uniforms. Those simple things that probably would have been problematic for us in previous years, are no longer an issue, so the little things that we do do, our athletes are appreciative.

“There is a whole lot more than we can do. Perhaps there is a benefit if they were to compete for the United Kingdom but there is no better place to be a king than at home.”

 

 

 

 

The tremendous success at the 49th Carifta Games in Kingston, Jamaica, is only another step on the pathway for the British Virgin Islands towards putting their athletes on the podium at the pinnacle of the sport.

At the Games that concluded last week, the BVI enjoyed their best-ever medal haul with four gold, two silver and a bronze medal surpassing their medal tallies from 2012 when they won five. Their medal haul saw them finish third in the standings behind Jamaica with 92 medals, 45 of them gold and the Bahamas 17. What was instructive was that BVI had the same number of gold medals, four, as their neighbours from the Bahamas.

Three of those medals were won by the imperious 16-year-old Adaejah Hodge, who the U17 100m, 200m and Long Jump to come away with the coveted Austin Sealy Award as the most outstanding athlete of the three-day meet.

But according to Steve Augustine, President of the BVI Athletics Association (BVIAA), the best is yet to come and is not too far away.

“What’s next for the BVIs, it’s back to the drawing board and putting in the work.  We have a long list of local, regional and international competitions remaining,” he said.  “While we are there, we haven’t officially arrived until we make the Olympic podium, we fell just short of this with two fourth-place finishes at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.  This year, we are, of course, eyeing World U20, the Commonwealth Games and World Championships at which I am certain we will again show up.”

Augustine’s confidence stems from his belief in the BVI’s strong grassroots programme that has consistently produced world-class talents from their population of just over 30,000 inhabitants.

“The BVIs formula for success at the Carifta Games speaks of a preparation process that has taken training and mental preparation processes to a higher level, a level that is more in keeping with our competitive Caribbean counterparts,” he reveals.

“Our local club system has resulted in on-island competition whereby our athletes are pushed, much more than before, to perform at higher levels for victories.  We monitor regional performances, we are well-advised by statisticians such as Rey O’Neal, and we are aware of where we need to be performance-wise if we are to be competitive.

“Our coaches are trained and certified, our athletes are hungry and they all aspire to be the next Kyron McMaster, Chantel Malone, Tahesia Harrigan Scott, Eldred Henry and now the next Adaejah Hodge.”

Hodge, he believes, will inspire a new generation of stars given what she has managed to accomplish at the 49th staging of the Games founded in 1972 by Sealy, who was on hand to present the award to her in front of an appreciative crowd.

“Yes, this will certainly happen but I must say our people naturally gravitate to athletics and despite all the struggles we may face as a growing territory, we have never had a numbers problem in athletics,” Augustine said.

“Support from the BVI Olympic Committee, World Athletics, our government, our fan base and with sponsors such as Puma onboard, we have been able to annually attract scores of athletes into our club system.

 “The level of performance that Adaejah exhibited at the Carifta Games is a reality that our people have become accustomed to over the years.  Adaejah has been performing at the top of her age group for years.  She’s remained world ranked as a junior and she has continued to dominate at the US high school level.  Adaejah was originally scheduled to make her Carifta debut at the 2020 Carifta Games and then the 2021 Carifta Games but for obvious reasons, those intentions had to be put aside.  As it relates to our young ones, they are certainly inspired by Adaejah. It’s been this way for years and perhaps more so now.” 

Augustine is confident that in the years to come, what unfolded in Kingston in mid-April will be more the norm than the exception.

“As it relates to other talents, the truth is there is only a handful of athletes on this year’s team that won’t be back next year and as it relates to those in the pipeline, we have a handful of gifted athletes that I know will represent the BVI well and will prove that they are indeed the next Adaejah Hodge, Kyron McMaster, Chantel Malone, Eldred Henry and Tahesia Harrigan-Scott.  

“The storybook on BVI Athletics is far from finished.”

 

 

 

Adaejah Hodge of the British Virgin Islands secured her status as the standout athlete of the meet with 200m gold as the 49th Carifta Games came to an end at the National Stadium in Kingston on Monday.

Hodge ran 23.43 to win the U-17 Girls 200m ahead of Jamaica’s Sabrina Dockery (24.25) and Theianna-Lee Terrelonge (24.64) and add to her gold medals in the 100m and long jump.

Jamaica’s Rickoy Hunter took gold in the U-17 Boys section with 22.13 ahead of St. Vincent’s Keo Davis (22.19) and Jamaica’s 400m champion Marcinho Rose (22.26).

Jamaica’s Brianna Lyston took gold in the Girls U-20 in 23.16 ahead of Trinidad and Tobago’s Shaniqua Bascombe (24.18) and Jamaica’s Kaylia Kelly (24.33).

Jamaica’s Bryan Levell completed the sprint double with 21.18 to win the U-20 Boys ahead of teammate Sandrey Davison (21.35) and Grenada’s Nazzio John (21.70).

Bryana Davidson then won gold for the hosts in the U-17 Girls 100m hurdles in 13.50 ahead of USVI’s Michelle Smith (14.31) and Jamaica’s Jody-Ann Daley (14.45).

The top two spots in the Boys U-17 110m hurdles went to Jamaica’s Shaquane Gordon (13.69) and Jadan Campbell (13.91) while St. Kitts & Nevis’ Jermahd Huggins was third in 15.21.

Jamaica once again found themselves with the top two spots on the podium in the Girls U-20 race as Alexis James ran 13.32 for gold ahead of teammate Oneka Wilson (13.67) and Barbados’ Nya Browne (14.63).

Curacao’s Matthew Sophia held his composure to triumph in the Boys U-20 110m hurdles in 13.74 ahead of Jamaica’s Demario Prince (13.88) and the Bahamas’ Antoine Andrews (13.91).

Moving into the 800m, USVI’s Michelle Smith incredibly recovered from her 100m hurdles silver medal a few minutes earlier to win the U-17 Girls section in 2:10.78 ahead of Jamaica’s Andrene Peart (2:13.07) and Guyana’s Attoya Harvey (2:14.08).

Jamaica won the U-20 Girls event through Jody-Ann Mitchell with 2:09.73. Barbados’ Layla Haynes ran 2:10.58 for second while Guyana’s Adriel Austin was third in 2:13.62.

The Boys U-17 event was won by Jamaica’s Ainsley Brown in 1:58.08 ahead of Trinidad and Tobago’s Keeran Sriskandarajah (1:58.45) and Jamaica’s Rasheed Pryce (1:58.51).

Jamaica’s J’Voughnn Blake added to his 1500m gold medal from Saturday with a 1:49.89 effort to win the U-20 Boys section ahead of Trinidad & Tobago’s Nathan Cumberbatch (1:51.86) and Jamaica’s Adrian Nethersole (1:51.96).

The Bahamas’ Mitchell Curtis won the U-20 Boys 5000m in 16:07.57 ahead of Jamaica’s Nicholas Power (16:08.93) and Trinidad and Tobago’s Tafari Waldron (16:35.73).

The Jamaican team of Sabrina Dockery, Quana Walker, Deandra Harris and Abigail Campbell were dominant to win the U-17 Girls 4x400m relay in 3:43.59 ahead of Bermuda (4:03.23) and the Bahamas (4:04.11).

Zachary Wallace, Ainsley Brown, Princewell Martin and Marcinho Rose combined to win the Boys U-17 section in 3:17.85 ahead of Trinidad & Tobago (3:18.89) and the Bahamas (3:21.35).

Sahfia Hinds, Onieka McAnuff, Shackelia Green and Rushana Dwyer combined to give the hosts their third 4x400m relay gold medal in the U-20 Girls section in 3:36.81 ahead of the British Virgin Islands (3:45.67) and Bermuda (3:48.69).

Shemar Palmer, Roshawn Clarke, Bryan Levell and Delano Kennedy combined to run 3:08.94 to secure gold for Jamaica in the U-20 Boys section ahead of Trinidad and Tobago (3:09.67) and Barbados (3:10.71).

In the field, Jamaica’s Kobe Lawrence threw an impressive new record 20.02m to win the U-20 Boys shot put ahead of teammate Christopher Young (19.12m) and Barbados’ Kevon Hinds (16.18m).

Jamaica’s Dionjah Shaw was also in record-breaking form in the U-17 Girls discus with a winning throw of 45.32m to better Paul Ann Gayle’s 2012 record of 43.99m.

Her Jamaican teammate Rehanna Biggs was second with 42.41m and Trinidad & Tobago’s Adriana Quamina was third with 35.23m.

Jamaica’s Jaydon Hibbert produced a wind-aided 17.05m to take gold in the Boys U-20 triple jump ahead of Barbados’ Aren Spencer (15.80m) and Jamaica’s Royan Walters (15.59m).

Sabrina Atkinson of Jamaica took gold in the U-17 Girls triple jump with 12.00m ahead of French Guiana’s Leane Alfred (11.77m) and the Bahamas’ Zoe Adderley (11.45m).

Jamaica finished at the top of the medal table with 92 medals including 45 gold, 29 silver and 18 bronze. The top five was rounded out by the Bahamas (four gold, six silver, seven bronze), the British Virgin Islands (four gold, two silver, one bronze), Trinidad & Tobago (two gold, 10 silver, 11 bronze) and Guyana (two gold, three silver, two bronze).

  

 

 

 

Dior-Rae Scott celebrated the Bahamas’ second javelin record at the 49th Carifta Games at the National Stadium in Kingston on Monday.

Scott threw a new Carifta record 44.57m to win the U-17 Girls javelin ahead of Trinidad & Tobago’s Kenika Cassar (42.86m) and Suerena Alexander of Grenada (42.57m).

Her countryman Keyshawn Strachan threw a new record of 79.89m to win gold in the U-20 Boys section on Saturday.

Interestingly, Scott's throw broke the record of current West Indies women cricketer Deandra Dottin who threw 42.90 in 2007 while representing Barbados.

Jamaica’s Serena Cole, a member of the world record breaking U-20 Girls 4x100m quartet from Sunday, jumped out to 5.89m to win the U-20 long jump ahead of French Guiana’s Kayssia Hudson who jumped 5.77m for second while Cole’s Jamaica teammate Kay-Lagay Clarke recorded 5.64m for third.

Jamaica’s Annishka McDonald (1.75m) and Malaika Cunningham (1.70m) won gold and silver in the U-20 Girls high jump ahead of Grenada’s Ahsharean Enoe (1.65m).

 

It was a record-breaking evening session on day two of the 49th Carifta Games at the National Stadium in Kingston on Sunday as Jamaica’s U-20 Girls 4x100m team of Serena Cole, Tina Clayton, Brianna Lyston and Tia Clayton sped to a new world junior record 42.58 to win gold ahead of Barbados (45.36) and Trinidad and Tobago (46.12).

Jamaica’s U-20 Boys team comprising Bouwahjgie Nkrumie, Bryan Levell, Deandre Daley and Sandrey Davison were also impressive with a Carifta record 39.15 to win gold ahead of the Bahamas (40.41) and the Cayman Islands (40.72).

Camoy Binger, Bryana Davison, Shemonique Hazle and Theianna-Lee Terrelonge combined to win Jamaica’s third sprint relay gold of the evening in the U-17 Girls section in 45.38 ahead of the Bahamas (47.13) and Trinidad & Tobago (48.19).

The hosts completed a clean sweep of the sprint relays as Jadan Campbell, Gary Card, Rickoy Hunter and Shaquane Gordon combined to dominate the Boys U-17 section in 41.74 ahead of Trinidad and Tobago (42.77) and the Cayman Islands (43.40).

Moving into the 400m hurdles, Michelle Smith of the US Virgin Islands won gold in the U-17 Girls section in 58.61 ahead of the Jamaican pair Jody-Ann Daley (1:02.22) and Deandra Harris (1:02.26).

Jamaica secured gold and silver in the U-20 Girls section through Sahfia Hinds (58.96) and Shackelia Green (59.77). Trinidad & Tobago’s Natasha Fox was third in 1:02.35.

The hosts once again swept the top two places in the Boys U-17 section thanks to Princewell Martin (53.00) and Jordan Mowatt (54.40) while Jermahd Huggins of St. Kitts & Nevis took third in 55.57.

Jamaica’s Roshawn Clarke won gold in the U-20 Boys section in 50.68 ahead of Shamiar Bain of the Bahamas (52.83) and Craig Prendergast of Antigua & Barbuda (55.08).

Moving into the field, Jamaica’s Chavez Penn cleared 2.05m to win the U-17 Boys high jump ahead of Andrew Stone of the Cayman Islands (2.00m) and Jamaica’s Aaron McKenzie (1.95m).

Penn was also victorious in the triple jump with 14.63m to win ahead of teammate Euan Young (14.41m) and Jonathan Rogers of the Bahamas (13.99m).

The British Virgin Islands’ emerging star and 100m champion Adaejah Hodge continued her stellar showing at the Games so far with gold in the U-17 Girls long jump with a distance of 6.20m ahead of Jamaica’s Shemonique Hazle (5.85m) and Rohanna Sudlow (5.65m).

 

Jamaica secured gold in the Boys U-20 long jump through the supremely talented Jaydon Hibbert on day two of the 49th Carifta Games at the National Stadium in Kingston on Sunday.

The Class I gold medallist in both the long and triple jump at last week’s ISSA Boys and Girls Championships jumped out to 7.62m to win gold ahead of St. Vincent’s Uroy Ryan (7.52m) and Barbados’ Aren Spencer (7.48m).

Hibbert will be looking for a second gold medal in the triple jump on Monday, an event in which he is currently the world U-20 leader with a massive 16.66m done to win gold at Champs.

Guyana’s Anisha Gibbons won gold in the U-20 Girls javelin with 42.54m ahead of the Barbadian pair of Vivica Addison (41.92) and Vanessa Greaves (41.17).

Dominica took gold in the U-20 Girls shot put through Treneese Eloui Hamilton’s 14.58m effort. Jamaica’s Brittania Johnson threw 14.19m for her second silver medal of these games while Suriname’s Alicia Grootfaam threw 12.97m for bronze.

In the 800m semis, Guyana’s 1500m champion from Saturday Attoya Harvey was the fastest qualifier to the U-17 Girls final in 2:15.76 ahead of Jamaica’s Andrene Peart (2:15.79) and her Guyanese teammate Narissa McPherson (2:19.89).

Bermuda’s Nirobi Smith Mills was the fastest qualifier to the Boys U-20 final with 1:55.11 ahead of Trinidad & Tobago’s Nathan Cumberbatch (1:55.75) and Jamaica’s 1500m silver medallist Adrian Nethersole (1:55.89). 1500m Gold medallist J’Voughnn Blake also advanced to the final comfortably in 1:58.31.

The 800m finals are scheduled for Monday. Both the Girls U-20 and Boys U-17 800m will be straight finals.

 

 

Jamaica’s Deandre Daley and Tina Clayton were crowned U-20 100m champions on day one of the 49th Carifta Games at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

Daley sped to a personal best 10.23 to win the Boys event ahead of Jamaican teammate Bouwahjgie Nkrumie (10.28) and Zachary Evans of the Bahamas (10.45).

Clayton won the Girls equivalent in 11.22 ahead of her twin sister Tia (11.30) and T&T’s Shaniqua Bascombe (11.57).

The Girls U-17 100m was won in impressive fashion by Adaejah Hodge of the British Virgin Islands in 11.29, miles ahead of Shatalya Dorsett of the Bahamas (11.80) and Jamaica’s Theianna-Lee Terrelonge (11.87).

Antigua and Barbuda’s Dwayne Fleming won the Boys U-17 equivalent in 10.72 ahead of Jamaica’s Gary Card (10.75) and St. Vincent’s Keo Davis (10.77).

Moving on to the 400m, Jamaica’s Delano Kennedy (46.66) and Shemar Palmer (46.97) secured first and second place ahead of St. Vincent’s Amal Glasgow (47.06) in the U-20 Boys final.

Jamaica secured another 1-2 finish in the U-20 Girls with Kaylia Kelly (52.32) and Oneika McAnuff (52.52) securing the top two spits ahead of Bermuda’s Caitlyn Bobb (53.12).

The Jamaican pair of Marcinho Rose (48.41) and Tajh-Marques White (48.82) secured another quinella for the hosts in the U-17 Boys section ahead of Kaiyin Morris of Trinidad and Tobago (49.01).

Jamaica’s Abigail Campbell comfortably won the Girls U-17 section in 53.83 ahead of Guyana’s Narissa Mohammed (55.39) and Jamaica’s Quana Walker (55.65).

In the 1500m, Jamaica secured the top two spots in the U-20 Boys as J'Voughnn Blake (4:00.04) and Adrian Nethersole (4:01.45) finished ahead of Trinidad and Tobago's Troy Llanos (4:01.47).

The U-20 Girls had a similar outcome as Jamaica's Rickeisha Simms (4:44.18) and Samantha Pryce (4:44.77) took gold and silver ahead of Barbados' Layla Haynes (4:45.10).

The Boys U-17 equivalent was won by Trinidad & Tobago's Keeran Sriskandarajah in 4:10.58 ahead of Guyana's Javon Roberts (4:12.54) and Jamaica's Yashon Bowen (4:13.15).

Guyana's Attoya Harvey took gold in the Girls U-17 section with 4:45.75) ahead of T&T's Kayleigh Forde (4:52.14) and Jamaica's Kededra Coombs (4:52.19).

Moving into the field, Jamaica's Kobe Lawrence (60.77) and Christopher Young (54.30) secured gold and silver in the U-20 boys discus. T&T's Jaden James threw 52.28m for bronze.

T&T's Aaron Antoine won gold in the Boys U-20 high jump with a 2.16m clearance ahead of Jamaica's Brandon Pottinger (2.14m) and St. Vincent's Verrol Sam (2.00m).

Andrew Stone of the Cayman Islands took gold in the Boys U-17 long jump with 6.76m ahead of T&T's Andrew Steele (6.61m) and Jamaica's Euan Young (6.60m).

Jamaica's Cedricka Williams threw 51.24 to win the Girls U-20 discus ahead of her teammate Brittania Johnson (49.74m) and Guadeloupe's Princesse Hyman (47.55m).

 

Keyshawn Strachan of the Bahamas started the 49th Carifta Games with a bang by breaking the Boys U-20 javelin record at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

Strachan, a finalist at the World Junior Championships in Nairobi last year, threw an impressive 78.89m to break the record of 78.28m set in 2016 by Grenadian 2019 World Champion Anderson Peters.

The Trinidadian pair of Anthony Diaz (63.69) and Dorian Charles (57.52) rounded out the top three.

Elsewhere in the field, Jamaica’s Danielle Noble cleared 1.73m to win the U-17 Girls high jump ahead of Trinidad and Tobago’s Tenique Vincent (1.65m) and the British Virgin Islands' Jah’kyla Morton (1.60m).

Morton's BVI teammate Savianna Joseph took home the Girls U-17 shot put with 13.54m ahead of Jamaica's Nastassia Burrell (13.10m) and the Bahamas' Terrell McCoy (13.00m). 

Teams from across the region have arrived in Jamaica ahead of the 49th staging set to begin at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday, April 16.

The Games were cancelled in 2020 and 2021 because of the Covid-19 pandemic but will now resume in earnest as the best junior athletes in the region pit their talents against each other over three days of intense competition with Jamaica hosting for the eighth time.

The latest teams to arrive include the Cayman Islands which has sent 29 athletes.

“We are expecting to do very well. We have some very talented runners. Some of our athletes are actually in school here in Jamaica and we’re expecting big things from them. Some of the kids are young and nervous but we will go well,” said Assistant Manager of the team, Paula Dawkins-Archbold told the Jamaica Observer.

Also arriving is the team from St. Kitts and Nevis. 'We have a team of 16 athletes-13 boys and three females and we hope to do some personal bests,” said team manager Azurdey Phillips.

The Bahamas has sent a team of 55, Trinidad and Tobago, 43 and Guyana 24. Bermuda which was to have hosted the Games in 2020 has sent a team of 20 while Barbados has sent 17 athletes.

SportsMax, the Caribbean’s premier sports and entertainment broadcaster, will broadcast the games live on its channels and Mobile App.

SportsMax will produce the CARIFTA Games and broadcast on linear TV via its many cable partners across the region and on CEEN TV outside the Caribbean and on its SportsMax and SportsMax+ channels within the SportsMax App in addition to partnering with several free-to-air entities across the region, ensuring that fans get to see their favourite athletes engage in pulsating track and field action over the Easter Weekend.

When the CARIFTA Games get underway, SportsMax, through its partnership with the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) and the North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics Association (NACAC), will ensure that the action on the track and on the field will be seen live on CNC3 in Trinidad, CBC in Barbados, CVM TV in Jamaica and Winners TV in St Lucia.

 

As the CARIFTA Games return for the first time since 2019, SportsMax, the Caribbean’s premier sports and entertainment broadcaster, will broadcast the games live on its channels and Mobile App.

Cancelled in 2020 and 2021 because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the CARIFTA Games first held in 1973, returns to the Caribbean sports landscape with the promise from the broadcaster that it will be bigger and better than ever. Jamaica will host the Games scheduled for April 16-18 at the National Stadium in Kingston and SportsMax Limited, the holder of the broadcast rights, plans to take the broadcast to a whole new level.

SportsMax will produce the CARIFTA Games and broadcast on linear TV via its many cable partners across the region and on CEEN TV outside the Caribbean and on its SportsMax and SportsMax+ channels within the SportsMax App in addition to partnering with several free-to-air entities across the region, ensuring that fans get to see their favourite athletes engage in pulsating track and field action over the Easter Weekend.

When the CARIFTA Games get underway, SportsMax, through its partnership with the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) and the North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics Association (NACAC), will ensure that the action on the track and on the field will be seen live on CNC3 in Trinidad, CBC in Barbados, CVM TV in Jamaica and Winners TV in St Lucia.

SportsMax CEO, Nicolas Matthews has also assured that viewers are in for a unique experience.

 “SportsMax will bring its world-class expertise and team to deliver the highest level of production, bringing quality to viewers across the world like never seen before for CARIFTA. Our team of highly innovative, passionate and qualified professionals will ensure viewers get the best seat in the house. As the Caribbean’s leading broadcaster, we will showcase athletes on screen from across the region as they compete to see who is the Caribbean’s best.”

Matthews said the broadcast will be of the highest standard that will include elements that are sure to enhance the viewing experience.

“As the Home of Champions, we plan to give our audience the best viewing experience as never seen before for CARIFTA. We have prepared features highlighting athletes from the many competing countries. You can expect to view over 20 hours of live coverage with daily highlight packages. Our world-class production comes with our first-class commentary team including world-renowned Lance Whittaker, Ricardo Chambers and other expert analysts from around the region.”

“There will be interviews with past CARIFTA athletes, now greats, and other special guests.”

In addition to the live broadcast on SportsMax and the SportsMax app, viewers can find clips of the action on the SportsMax YouTube channel.

“We look forward to a great competition and SportsMax will ensure a true track and field broadcast, where CARIFTA gets the quality attention it deserves,” Matthews concluded.

 

 

Garth Gayle, President of the Jamaica Athletic Administrative Association (JAAA) has expressed confidence that the Jamaican team for the 2022 Carifta Games is ready to defend its title when the games get under way at the National Stadium in Kingston next month.

Jamaica will field a team of 78 athletes for the April 16-18 Games led by the talented twins, Tia and Tina Clayton, Brianna Lyston as well as standouts Bryan Levell and Rayon Campbell.

“It is a very talented team of junior athletes that will represent Jamaica and do well at the Carifta Games,” said Gayle who pointed to the world-class performances that were on show during the recent Carifta trials where 17-year-old Lyston ran 22.66 to win the U20 Girls 200m.

Levell also produced a fast 20.53 to easily win the 200m.

Rayon Campbell was also a standout winning the 400m hurdles in what was a world-leading time of 49.52.

Gayle said it was clear that, with the WorldU20 Championships in mind, the coaches across the island have remarkably in getting their athletes prepared for both competitions.

The athletes selected are as follows:

U17 Girls: Theianna-Lee Terrelonge, Camoy Binger, Abigail Campbell, Quiana Walker, Andrene Peart, Ricaria Campbell, Kededra Coombs, Deandra Harris, Bryana Davidson, Jody-Ann Daley, Asia McKay, Danielle Noble, Rohanna Sudlow, Shemonique Hazle, Sabrina Atkinson, Dionjah Shaw, Rehanna Biggs and Nastassia Burrell.

U17 Boys: Gary Card, Shaquane Gordon, Romario Hines, Rickoy Hunter, Tajh-Marques White, Marchino Rose, Ainsley Brown, Rasheed Pryce, Yoshane Bowen, Tyrone Lawson, Jordan Mowatt, Princewell Martin, Jadan Campbell, Zachary Wallace, Aaron McKenzie, Chavez Penn, Euan Young and Despiro Wray.

U20 Girls: Tia Clayton, Tina Clayton, Brianna Lyston, Oneika McAnnuff, Shackelia Green, Kaylia Kelly, Rushana Dwyer, Samantha Pryce, Jody Ann Mitchell, Ashara Frater, Safhia Hinds, Alexis James, Oneka Wilson, Britannia Johnson, Annishka McDonald, Malaika Cunningham, Serena Cole, Kay-Lagay Clarke,  Jo-Anna Pinnock, Cedricka Williams and Rickeisha Simms.

U20 Boys: DeAndre Daley, Bryan Levell, Bouwahjgie Nkrumie, Sandrey Davison, Delano Kennedy, Shemar Palmer, J’Voughnn Blake, Adrian Nethersole, Nicholas Power, Christopher Young, Balvin Israel, Royan Walters, Brandon Pottinger, Xavier Codling, Kobe Lawrence, Rayon Campbell, Roshawn Clarke, Jahvel Granville, Demario Prince and Jaydon Hibbert.

Dr Oneil Ankle will be the Chef de Mission while Orett Wallace will be the Team Manager.

 

 

Athletes, coaches and support personnel arriving in Jamaica for next month’s Carifta Games will no longer be required to show proof of vaccinations. However, in light of the shift in policy, the Local Organizing Committee is encouraging them to adhere to the accepted safety measures.

“We are pleased to advise that no proof of vaccination for COVID 19 will be required from participants including athletes, coaches and other support personnel, officials, representatives of the media, volunteers and spectators,” said a statement from the Carifta Games LOC on Wednesday.

Notwithstanding, the revised policy, the Chairman of the LOC, Mike Fennell wants participants to appreciate that the virus has not gone anywhere.

 "(I) am strongly recommending and encouraging everyone to continue to practice all the standard safety measures such as good personal hygiene, wearing of masks, and social distancing. Please be reminded that the Covid 19 virus is still with us and due care and attention must be observed by all," Fennell said.

"We would also like to assure you that we will continue to sanitize all relevant areas at the Athletes Village and the warm-up and competition facilities at the National Stadium, and one of our partners for the Games, Konnexx Services, will be undertaking this responsibility as a part of our agreement.

 "We remind you to check the current policies for the conditions and protocols required by airlines and those for your own countries’ re-entry."

The issue of whether or not spectators will be allowed to attend the upcoming Carifta Games is yet to be resolved and remains a key area of focus for organisers.

The regional junior track and field event is expected to be staged in Jamaica for the first time since 2011 and more specifically return to the city of Kingston for the first time since 1996, in April of this year.

With the country and globe still in the midst of battling the coronavirus pandemic, however, the situation regarding the possibility of spectators and the number of spectators that can attend a given event, as always, remains a fluid and often tenuous process.

For example, recently it was announced that another upcoming track meet, the Gibson Relays, would be allowed to have spectators in attendance.  Only a few weeks ago, however, the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) was denied permission for fans to enter the National Stadium for the country’s World Cup qualifiers.

Chairman of the local organising committee of the 2022 Carifta Games, Mike Fennell, revealed negotiations regarding the situation of fans were ongoing.

“We have a meeting set up with the agencies and ministries in providing the sort of regulations that will exist,” Fennell said.

“We have not finalized anything yet because we know that that is a moving target and the times are not static, but we continue to have meetings and there is goodwill all around,” he added.

“Everyone accepts the importance of having these games.  They're not for the seniors, they’re for the juniors but it is critical in the development of the sport.”

Richard Pandohie, the Chief Executive Officer of the Seprod Group of Companies, has been named patron of the 2022 Carifta Games.

 As the patron, Pandohie will be the primary spokesperson for the event and will use his traditional and social media platforms to promote the Games scheduled for Kingston from April 16 - 18.

An estimated 500 athletes from across the region are expected to compete at what will be the 49th staging of the event.

 Chairman of the Local Organizing Committee, Mikel Fennell, made the announcement at the weekly meeting on Friday.

 “It’s a happy day when on behalf of the LOC, we can welcome our patron. He is one of the brightest minds representing business in the corporate sector, having transformed the Seprod Group of Companies into one of the most dynamic companies in the region,” Fennell said. 

 “His association with the Games which seeks to convert the lives of young people in the same way as he has done with the manufacturing and distribution company makes him a natural fit for this role.”

 In accepting, Pandohie said he is aware of the magnitude of the appointment.

 “I understand fully the role I have to perform,” he said. “There is so much in Jamaica that comes with what sport (track and field) has to offer in the process of developing world-beaters.

 JAAA President Garth Gayle acknowledged Pandohie’s appointment saying that his contribution will be of “tremendous value, not just to the Games, but to track and field in Jamaica.” 

 

 

The Jamaica Administrative Athletics Association (JAAA) has confirmed that Jamaica will host the 49th Junior Carifta Track and Field Games in Kingston from April 16 – 18, 2022 at a cost of just under US$1 million.

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