Borussia Monchengladbach have announced they will play a charity friendly against the Ukraine national team at Borussia Park.

All profits from the game, which will take place on May 11, will be donated to charitable causes for people in or from Ukraine.

The match will be Ukraine's first since the start of the invasion by Russia and is part of Oleksandr Petrakov's team's preparations for their rescheduled World Cup playoff with Scotland in June, as well as subsequent Nations League fixtures.

Gladbach chief executive Stephan Schippers told the club's website: "We're very happy to be able to help the Ukrainian FA through this game, and hope that as many football fans as possible from all over the country come to the stadium and make a donation to a good cause by buying a ticket to the match.

"All Ukrainian citizens will have free entry to the game."

It follows an exhibition match between another Bundesliga side, Borussia Dortmund, and Ukrainian opponents Dynamo Kyiv, who raised €400,000 in support of victims of the war as Dynamo secured a 3-2 win at Signal Iduna Park on Tuesday.

The contest was part of Dynamo's Match for Peace tour, which has also included games against Legia Warsaw, Galatasaray and Cluj.

Ukraine's hopes of reaching the World Cup will be decided in early June after new dates were confirmed for the postponed play-off games.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine meant the original plan to play Scotland in March was shelved and the knock-on effect was that Wales have also been kept waiting.

To reach the finals in Qatar, Ukraine must win away to Scotland on Wednesday, June 1, before coming out on top in another away game against Wales on June 5.

Wales secured their place in the final round of the play-offs with a 2-1 victory against Austria on March 24, which had been the original date for the Scotland-Ukraine fixture.

The winner of the final European play-off will go into a World Cup group alongside England, Iran and the United States.

UEFA announced the new play-off dates on Thursday, as well as explaining how its Nations League opening fixtures, also set for the June international window, would be rearranged to allow for Ukraine, Wales and Scotland to fulfil their World Cup commitments.

European football's governing body said it had held "extensive discussions" with eight national associations who would be affected by the World Cup games being switched to the intended Nations League dates and said there had been "a remarkable spirit of solidarity and cooperation" in negotiating an updated schedule.

Wales were due to play Poland in the Nations League on June 3, but that game has been switched to June 1, meaning Rob Page's team will have a competitive game in the build-up to facing either Scotland or Ukraine.

Scotland had been due to play Ukraine in the Nations League on June 7, but that game has been shunted back to September 21, with both teams then due to play three games in seven days.


Nations League group A4 and B1 games affected by World Cup play-offs, with new dates:

June 1: A4 - Poland v Wales
June 4: B1 - Armenia v Republic of Ireland
June 8: A4 - Belgium v Poland, Wales v Netherlands; Scotland v Armenia, Republic of Ireland v Ukraine
June 11: A4 - Netherlands v Poland, Wales v Belgium
June 14: A4 - Netherlands v Wales, Poland v Belgium
September 21: B1 - Scotland v Ukraine
September 24: B1 - Scotland v Republic of Ireland, Armenia v Ukraine
September 27: B1 - Republic of Ireland v Armenia, Ukraine v Scotland

Ukraine midfielder Taras Stepanenko wants their World Cup qualifying play-off semi-final against Scotland to be postponed again.

Scotland and Ukraine were meant to meet last month, but FIFA delayed the match until June due to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

As such, Wales – who beat Austria 2-1 in their play-off semi – are yet to find out which team they will face for a place at the Qatar World Cup in November.

Wales, Scotland and Ukraine all know which group they will be in should they progress, however, with the winner of the play-off path having been drawn alongside England, Iran and the United States in Group B.

But with no sign of the conflict in Ukraine ceasing, Stepanenko, who has played 69 times for his country, has called on FIFA to delay the match with Scotland again. 

The Shakhtar Donetsk man, who last played a match in December, told The Sunday Times: "We don't want to be known as victims here. We are strong and capable guys, everyone is fine, and we can play 100 per cent.

"But the question I would ask is how can we play such an important game when you haven't played a match for such a long time?

"Every football player knows that if you recover from an injury for a long time, no matter how much you work out in the gym and do running, you go out to play football and everything is different.

"The level and strength may not be enough with one match, but we will be asked to play two incredibly tough matches in maybe four days to get to the World Cup. If there is no option, then we must play.

"But I think it would be extremely difficult to achieve two positive results. We are hoping FIFA and UEFA recognise this and postpone the matches to give us more time to prepare."

Speaking after the World Cup draw was made in Doha on Friday, both England manager Gareth Southgate and USA coach Gregg Berhalter stressed they were not concerned by how long it might take for the final team in their group to be confirmed, given the extraordinary circumstances.

"When that tie is played out is irrelevant really," said Southgate, while Berhalter added: "We're patient on that and pulling for [Ukraine] 100 per cent."

Gareth Southgate said England's foremost focus will be getting out of their World Cup group after two of their three opponents were confirmed in Friday's draw.

England, who have reached one major semi-final and one final under Southgate, will open their campaign with a first-ever meeting against Iran on the tournament's opening day on November 21.

They will then face the United States in a repeat of their opening game at the 2010 World Cup, while their final group match could see them face a home nations rival in Wales or Scotland, who will compete with Ukraine for Europe's final qualification place in a play-off that has been delayed due to Ukraine's ongoing conflict with Russia.

On paper, Group B looks set to present a smooth passage to the knockout stages for England but Southgate, who led the Three Lions to a first World Cup semi-final since 1990 four years ago, is not looking any further ahead than the group stages.

"The first two teams we've not played for quite a while," Southgate told BBC Sport. "The third is a total unknown but throws up a possible British derby. We know what they're all about, we've had plenty of them!

"For us, we're in on day one so it's quite clear now what our program looks like, with the end of the Premier League season and getting out here as quickly as possible."

Asked if that knowledge gave England more time to prepare for possible knockout games, Southgate responded: "It does, but we've got to get out of the group.

"What we've done well is approach these tournaments by looking at the group. 

"The first objective is to get out of the group, regardless of the opposition, and then you build from there.

"When you're seeded, you get the advantage of missing out on those big six or seven teams. For most of the first seeds, they'll be pleased with the group they get.

"There's obviously some really high ranked teams in Pot Two, and the US in particular, I know Gregg Berhalter quite well, we've met a couple of times and had long chats about things. 

"They've got some very good players and we know what they could be capable of as a nation. That one, in particular, is an intriguing one."

Furthermore, being drawn into a World Cup group with the United States for a third occasion represents the first time that England have been in the same group as one particular nation at three separate editions of the tournament.

England captain Harry Kane, meanwhile, was glad to see that the Three Lions will open their campaign on the first day of the tournament.

"Always exciting to see who we get in the group!" Kane tweeted. "Playing on the opening day will be incredible as well."

The decision to host the World Cup in Qatar has faced strong opposition from many quarters.

Southgate, who made his opposition to any boycott of the tournament clear during the recent international break, expressed his desire for the World Cup to drive substantive change in the Gulf state.

"We'll continue to speak to people here," he added. "We've got to build relationships here to be able to highlight any change that we'd like to make. 

"It's important to do that in the right way. Today my focus is just on the draw and working out what that all means really."

Alan Shearer claims England will be happy with their group for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, with the Three Lions facing the United States, Iran, and the final European play-off winner.

The draw means Gareth Southgate's men could face a clash against rivals Wales or Scotland, with the Scots due to face Ukraine for a place in June's play-off final in Cardiff.

It also threw up a repeat of England's 2010 clash with the United States, with whom they shared a 1-1 draw in their opening game at the tournament in South Africa.

England have never faced Wales, Scotland, or Ukraine at the World Cup, but did face a home nation in each of their last two European Championship campaigns, beating Wales 2-1 at Euro 2016 and drawing 0-0 with Scotland at Euro 2020. 

Former England captain Shearer felt his nation should be pleased to have avoided many of the bigger nations, and spoke of his excitement at the prospect of facing a rivalry match.

"Gareth will look at that and think it could have been a lot more difficult," Shearer said to BBC Sport. "I am sure he and his players will be happy with that. 

"This is the one thing in not having that 'group of death', it [the tournament] is pretty much open.

"I have to say that I am pleased Scotland, Wales or Ukraine got put in England's group. It adds that little bit more excitement. If it is Wales or Scotland it makes it a bit tougher.

"Gareth Southgate would have taken that - deep down, without a doubt. 

"He just can't come out and say it just in case. He's too professional to say it, but he'll be more than happy with it."

"It's a big enough incentive to get to the World Cup but to be in a group with England is great and that will motivate the players," he said.

"We've got play-offs we have to worry about first. It won't be easy against Ukraine. If we manage to get through that and play Wales in the final then that is a huge game. 

"Scotland don't have a bad record against Wales and Scotland are in a good place at the moment.

"Our performance at Wembley in the Euros showed the potential of this Scotland team. They've responded well to going out in the group stage at the Euros and there's competition for places all over the pitch."

Former Wales skipper Ashley Williams was also pleased with his nation's draw, but insisted that Rob Page's team would be desperate to reach their first World Cup since 1958 for their own reasons.

"No disrespect to anyone, all the teams are good, but it could have been a little bit more daunting in another potential group," he said.

"I'm quite happy but there's a lot of work to do before then. 

"They [Wales] just want to get there anyway for their own reasons [not purely to face England]. One of Wales or Scotland usually draw England!"

England will begin their 16th appearance at the World Cup against Iran on November 21, before facing the United States on November 25 and wrapping up their group campaign on November 29.

Gareth Bale scored a pair of stunning goals to secure a home World Cup play-off final for Wales against either Scotland or Ukraine.

Wales have not qualified for a World Cup since 1958 and surely will not get a better opportunity than ahead of Qatar 2022.

Rob Page's side hosted Austria in their play-off semi-final on Thursday and once again relied on Real Madrid superstar Bale to prove the difference in a 2-1 win.

He netted the opener with a sublime first-half free-kick, then doubled Wales' lead with another brilliant effort, placed high past the Austria goalkeeper.

Only a Ben Davies own goal – deflecting Marcel Sabitzer's shot beyond Wayne Hennessey – threatened to spoil the Welsh party, as they held on despite Bale's withdrawal in stoppage time with an apparent groin injury.

Bale will at least have time to recover from that issue before the final, as Russia's invasion of Ukraine saw the former banned from FIFA competitions and the latter allowed to postpone their semi against Scotland.

No date has yet been set for the Scotland tie, with Steve Clarke's men instead facing Poland – Russia's planned play-off opponents – in a friendly they drew 1-1 on Thursday.

Krzysztof Piatek's 94th-minute penalty rescued a draw for Poland, albeit that goal came earlier than Sweden's decisive strike against Czech Republic.

Sweden will be Poland's final opponents after Robin Quaison finished off a smart team move with 10 minutes remaining in extra time following a goalless draw – that 1-0 victory teeing up the trip to Chorzow on Tuesday.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has dismissed the notion of Russia hosting Euro 2028 as "beyond satire", instead suggesting the tournament be awarded to Ukraine.

Russia launched a bid for either Euro 2028 or Euro 2032 on Wednesday, despite the country's ongoing invasion of their Eastern European neighbour.

That puts the 2018 World Cup hosts against a joint United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland bid for the former, an Italy bid for the latter and a Turkey bid for either event.

"The idea of Russia holding any idea of football tournament or any kind of cultural event right now is beyond satire," Johnson said in Brussels, where a Nato summit addressing Vladimir Putin's invasion is taking place.

"I can’t believe that anybody would seriously consider their suggestion."

Johnson appeared to forget that his own country had bid for Euro 2028 when he subsequently suggested the best path would be to hand it to Ukraine, who jointly hosted Euro 2012 with Poland.

"I think the best thing possible would be for the entire Russian forces to retire forthwith from Ukraine and hand the tournament to them," Johnson added.

Last year's rearranged Pan-European edition saw Italy triumph over England in a penalty shoot-out final at Wembley Stadium.

Hosts will be confirmed for 2028 and 2032 in September 2023, ahead of the next edition in Germany in 2024.

Andriy Shevchenko is hopeful for a positive resolution to the upheaval at Chelsea, but insists his focus is with Ukraine amid its war with Russia.

Russia invaded neighbouring Ukraine late in February after weeks of heightening political tensions between the two countries.

The actions of Russia have led to widespread condemnation, with financial, sporting and political sanctions imposed on the nation in an attempt to deter the attacks.

Russian oligarch and Blues owner Roman Abramovich was sanctioned by the UK government, which froze his assets, after he previously announced his intention to sell the club.

Investment firm Raine Group is overseeing the process to sell the club, with any funds to be directed to a charitable organisation or into a frozen account.

While Shevchenko, who is Ukraine's all-time leading scorer and former coach, does not wish to see his former club Chelsea suffer as a result of Abramovich's involvement, he is concentrating on the tragedy unfolding in his homeland.

Asked about football and the ongoing Chelsea takeover speculation, he told the Daily Mail: "It doesn't exist. For me, it doesn't exist. I'm concentrating on delivering this message.

"I'm not looking at sport now. I know what's happening. But in this moment, sport is secondary for me. I'm not looking there. I'm concentrating on my country.

"People take their position but for me, the message which has been sprayed from the sport society is clear: stop the war.

"I understand what's going on with Chelsea. I get it. For the good of the club and the fans, this situation should get resolved. I hope it is. But I'm concentrating on Ukraine."

A section of Chelsea supporters came in for criticism for showing their vocal support for Abramovich during applause for Ukraine before an away game at Burnley, but Shevchenko still believes his old club deserve to come through a tough period,

"The history which Chelsea built cannot be cancelled," he continued. "The Chelsea fans will always stay behind the club because they love the club. I know it's a difficult moment.

"But I am also in a position where, with what is happening to my country, I want to appeal to everyone to play your part. Remember what is most important.

"I want only one thing: to bring the peace in my country, to stop the killing of innocent people, to stop the killing of kids. We all know war is cruel. But we cannot stand for that."

Shevchenko has previously asked people to join him in speaking out against the attacks as he called for peace to be restored.

He has also stayed in London during the conflict to help lead the humanitarian aid effort and raise awareness in England, but his family remain in Ukraine in solidarity with their compatriots.

The 45-year-old explained how he has been in contact with fellow Ukrainian footballers during the conflict, asking them to keep playing and representing their country.

"I always tell the boys: keep playing," he added. "You play for your country. This is a great message. The sport world is very united. It is against the war.

"[Oleksandr] Zinchenko, [Vitaliy] Mykolenko, [Andriy] Yarmolenko, [Roman] Yaremchuk, it's very important that the boys keep playing. I'm calling them. I'm supporting them. 

'We're united. It's the message of my campaign – play your part. Do whatever you can. Please, keep talking about Ukraine. We feel like we are not alone. If you support our athletes, you support us."

Ukraine's resistance has been fierce, with the progress of Russia's invasion much slower than anticipated.

"You feel every bomb that touches the ground because the house is shaking," said Shevchenko. "This is what the war is now. It's in that stage where the Russians surround the city and are just bombing. They don't stop. It's relentless. 

"It doesn't give the Ukrainian people the chance for humanitarian corridors. My mum is there. My sister is there. My uncle. My auntie. My cousin. My friends – some in the frontline.

"They stand for our country, for our freedom, for our choice, for our pride. We defend. We fight. We have to. We don't have a choice.

"The position of president Volodymyr Zelensky was very important. He could have left. But he sent a clear message to say he would stay and that we had to defend our country. That united the Ukrainian people. He stayed with them, and we won't give up.

"Ukraine's independence is only 30 years old. When I first started playing football, that was just when we became independent. From the first day to now, I've always been proud to be Ukrainian, and someone else is not going to dictate to us."

Atalanta boss Gian Piero Gasperini has hailed Ukraine midfielder Ruslan Malinovskyi's contributions to the club in recent weeks, amid the ongoing crisis unfolding back in the latter's home country.

The Ukraine international has been a key performer for the Serie A side so far this term, but has found himself thrust into the spotlight for different reasons following Russia's invasion of his home country.

Malinovskyi netted in last week's Europa League last-16 clash with Bayer Leverkusen, in which La Dea prevailed 3-2, and is expected to figure in Thursday's reverse encounter in Germany.

Speaking ahead of the trip, Gasperini offered praise for how the midfielder has responded, including a poignant gesture where he kissed a black armband in the first leg in Bergamo after scoring.

"To tell the truth, Ruslan has had a really important season, and this one has been a bit more troubled," the head coach told his pre-match news conference.

"Now he has moments in which he is in the best situation, he becomes decisive. In addition, we realise the emotional moment he is going through.

"When he manages to clean up his game, with the shot that he has, it will become important. He is a player that we have adapted to that role, he often becomes decisive.

"We hope that in the end, he is as good as possible, because we need him."

Elsewhere, Gasperini revealed that Duvan Zapata is nearing a comeback from injury, with the coach adding that he hopes to have the Colombia star back on hand as early as next month.

"He is recovering well, we hope his return is close," he added. "We will see in April, we hope it is plausible. He will have to get to match sharpness, but he is training well individually and in the gym."

Atalanta face Leverkusen on Thursday, before they wrap up their March commitments with a trip to Bologna in Serie A before the international break brings a halt to club football.

Andriy Yarmolenko said he was grateful for the support being shown to himself and the Ukrainian people after scoring West Ham's opener in a 2-1 win over Aston Villa.

The winger, who is second to Andriy Shevchenko (48) in Ukraine's all-time goalscoring charts after netting 44 goals for his country, poked into the bottom corner on 70 minutes to set the Hammers on their way to victory at the London Stadium.

Yarmolenko was making his first appearance since being granted a period of leave by West Ham boss David Moyes after Russia invaded his homeland last month and was welcomed with a standing ovation when introduced from the bench in the second half.

After marking the occasion in the perfect manner with his goal, the winger expressed gratitude for the support he has received in an emotional post-match interview.

"What happened today, it was so emotional for me," the 32-year-old told West Ham's media channels.

"You know the situation in my country, it's so difficult for me, at this moment, to think about football because every day in my country, Russia's army kills Ukrainian people. So, it was so emotional.

"To be honest I don't know what to say, it's just so emotional. I just want to say thank you to my team-mates, who support me all the time, every day.

"To the West Ham fans, who support me, who support the Ukrainian people, I also want to say thank you.

"I want to say thank you to all British people, because we feel that you support us.

"For me it's really important to feel support from the manager, from team-mates, and from the fans. When I feel it, I give everything for the fans and for the club."

Ukrainian winger Andriy Yarmolenko scored a dazzling goal in West Ham's 2-1 Premier League win over Aston Villa, sparking an emotional celebration.

Yarmolenko, who has hit 44 goals to sit second behind Andriy Shevchenko in the Ukraine national team's all-time goalscoring charts, was granted time off by West Ham boss David Moyes last month when Russia's military began to invade his homeland.

The 32-year-old made his first appearance since the war in Ukraine began during Sunday's match against Villa at the London Stadium, coming on as a substitute after 52 minutes to a standing ovation.

Yarmolenko marked the occasion in superb fashion after 70 minutes, turning on Said Benrahma's pass before poking into the bottom corner with the outside of his left boot to open the scoring.

He collapsed to his knees in an emotional celebration, being mobbed by team-mates after netting his first Premier League goal of the season.

Pablo Fornals then doubled the hosts' lead on 82 minutes, and despite Jacob Ramsey's late consolation, Yarmolenko was able to celebrate a perfect return to action.

Former England striker Gary Lineker saluted Yarmolenko's spirit.

Lineker wrote on Twitter: "A win for @WestHam and a goal for Andriy Yarmolenko. How he manages to focus and play, let alone come on and score is beyond me. Ukrainians are incredible."

Former Ukraine captain Anatoliy Tymoshchuk has been given a life-long ban from "engaging in football activities" in his homeland amid silence on Russia's invasion and continued association with Russian club Zenit.

The Ukrainian Football Association (UAF) has also stripped Tymoshchuk of his coaching license and de-recognised his on-field accomplishments, which include silverware and a record 144 caps.

The proposals were announced earlier this week by the UAF’s ethics and fair play committee, which accused Tymoshchuk of making a "conscious choice" that "damages the image of Ukrainian football".

Tymoshchuk, 42, was a Champions League winner with Bayern Munich in 2013. Either side of his four-year spell in Germany, he had stints with Zenit, and in 2016 he joined up again with the Russian Premier League club in a coaching role.

The UAF ethics investigators said that by continuing to work for Zenit – who are owned and sponsored by majority state-controlled energy company Gazprom – while Russian forces invade Ukraine, Tymoshchuk was breaching the association's code of ethics and fair play.

The ethics committee said in a statement on the UAF website: "Since the beginning of Russia's military aggression against Ukraine, Tymoshchuk, the former captain of the Ukrainian national team, has not only made no public statements in this regard, nor has he stopped his cooperation with the aggressor's club.

"By making this conscious choice, Tymoshchuk damages the image of Ukrainian football."

Tymoshchuk won Ukrainian Premier League, Ukrainian Cup and Ukrainian Super Cup honours with Shakhtar Donetsk before his first spell at Zenit.

Ukraine are set to strip their former captain Anatoliy Tymoshchuk of his record 144 caps and impose a string of further heavy sanctions as punishment for his ongoing work at Russian club Zenit.

The proposals were announced on Wednesday by the ethics and fair play committee of the Ukrainian Football Association, which accused Tymoshchuk of making a "conscious choice" that "damages the image of Ukrainian football".

Tymoshchuk, 42, was a Champions League winner with Bayern Munich in 2013. Either side of his four-year playing spell in Germany, he had stints with Zenit, and in 2016 he joined up again with the Russian Premier League club in a coaching role.

The Ukrainian FA (UAF) ethics investigators said that by continuing to work for Zenit, while Russian forces invade Ukraine, Tymoshchuk was breaching the association's code of ethics and fair play.

The ethics committee said in a statement on the UAF website: "Since the beginning of Russia's military aggression against Ukraine, Tymoshchuk, the former captain of the Ukrainian national team, has not only made no public statements in this regard, nor has he stopped his cooperation with the aggressor's club.

"By making this conscious choice, Tymoshchuk damages the image of Ukrainian football."

It said it intended to ask high command within the UAF to remove Tymoshchuk's coaching pro licence and to request that public authorities remove his state awards and honours.

On top of that, it said it would request that his status as a winner of domestic competitions at club level in Ukraine be wiped, and for him to be removed from the official register of players to have represented Ukraine national teams.

Tymoshchuk won Ukrainian Premier League, Ukrainian Cup and Ukrainian Super Cup honours with Shakhtar Donetsk before embarking on his first spell at Zenit.

Poland have been awarded a bye through to the World Cup qualifying play-off final following the postponement of their clash with Russia.

FIFA confirmed the news on Tuesday, though Russia have indicated that they will appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport against a ban on its national teams from competing.

Should the decision be upheld, Poland will face either Sweden or the Czech Republic – with that semi-final on March 24 still set to go ahead – for a place at Qatar 2022.

That 'Path B' final will be held at the Silesian Stadium in Chorzow on March 29.

FIFA's decision comes on the back of Poland, Sweden and the Czech Republic announcing last week they would each refuse to play Russia due to ongoing events in Ukraine.

Russia invaded Ukraine on Thursday 24 following weeks of rising political tensions in the region, with more than two million citizens fleeing the country.

Meanwhile, FIFA has also confirmed that Ukraine's 'Path A' semi-final with Scotland at Hampden Park, scheduled for March 24, will now take place in June.

Ukraine requested that the game be pushed back due to "the impossibility of organising both the travel and training of a team under the current circumstances".

The other semi-final in that side of the draw, the clash between Wales and Austria in Cardiff on the same day, will go ahead as planned.

However, the final will be postponed until after the Scotland and Ukraine game is played.

FIFA has announced a series of temporary measures to facilitate the departure of players and coaches from Ukraine and Russia.

World football's governing body had already banned Russian clubs and teams from its competitions in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, although Russia has since made clear its intention to appeal such sanctions.

FIFA has now confirmed a number of changes to registration and contract rules, designed to benefit players and staff who have been directly impacted by the conflict.

All contracts of foreign players and coaches working in Ukraine, FIFA has announced, will be automatically suspended until June 30, 2022, "in order to provide players and coaches with the opportunity to work and receive a salary [abroad], and to protect Ukrainian clubs."

Meanwhile, FIFA has also moved to make it easier for foreign coaches or players plying their trade in Russia to leave the country, should they wish to do so.

Foreign coaches or players will now have the right to unilaterally suspend their contracts with Russian clubs until the end of June this year. 

Shakhtar Donetsk head coach Roberto De Zerbi as well as a plethora of Brazilian players at the same club, are amongst those who could potentially seek to work outside of Ukraine for the remainder of the season.

The invasion of Ukraine has attracted widespread condemnation from across the sporting world, while two high-profile foreign Russian Premier League coaches suddenly left their posts after the invasion.

Former Norwich City boss Daniel Farke quit his role as Krasnodar coach last week without managing a single game, while Markus Gisdol left Lokomotiv Moscow, telling German newspaper BILD that he could not work in a nation "whose leader has invaded another country in the middle of Europe."

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