Frustrated Everton manager Sean Dyche has told his players it is time they started taking responsibility for the chances they are missing in front of goal as more failures up front contributed to their 3-1 defeat at home to West Ham.

Beto’s 56th-minute header, after he had missed the club’s first penalty of the season, put them ahead but Kurt Zouma equalised within six minutes and, having found goalkeeper Alphonse Areola in good form, conceded twice in stoppage time to Tomas Soucek and Edson Alvarez.

Problems up front have been an issue all season – only the bottom two sides Burnley and Sheffield United have scored fewer than the Toffees’ 29 – but there are signs Dyche is starting to lose patience.

“I am looking at the talent we have got and looking at the quality we have got and how we are not scoring more goals is just bizarre,” he said after a 10th game without victory.

“I can talk about the xG, I can talk about the quality, I can talk about everything but I’ve never been naive in football and you have to go and do it.

“I’ve just said to the players we have a responsibility collectively to actively go and take the chances we are creating and that is everyone.

“It is hard to correct it when it is there, right in front of your eyes. What more can we do?

“But the players have a responsibility at this football club as well as the manager and staff and we know it is a joint responsibility.”

Dropping Dominic Calvert-Lewin, without a goal in his last 21 matches, was somewhat justified by only Beto’s second league goal on an afternoon of mixed emotions for the £24million summer signing from Udinese.

But Dyche was pleased with the Portuguese’s reaction, adding: “That was what was pleasing about Beto.

“Missing a penalty is not easy, he missed a good chance in the first half but he kept going and it is great header.

“He fatigued so we had to take him off but it is another good marker from him to say ‘Look, I am ready and I want to take it on’.”

For West Ham boss David Moyes it was two wins in six days to keep his side in seventh place and chasing European qualification.

“I think the result was harsh on Everton but our goalkeeper made four or five outstanding saves,” said the Scot, on his return to his former club.

“We scored three goals at Everton, they don’t concede too many, we scored four in the week against Brentford, so we’ve done the job.

“We have come through six or seven weeks when very little has gone for us; today I don’t know if it’s the right word in that it went for us but the goalkeeper made saves which he is there to do.

“I’d have to say I’m thrilled with the win, a wee bit of a throwback, but I really enjoyed it.”

Moyes reserved special praise for his goalkeeper, adding: “He probably made the difference, his performance was terrific.

“A lot of goalkeepers get praised for different things – the use of the ball – but most people from the era I come from it is the ones who save it with their hands and stop the ball going in the net most of the time and I thought he did that really well today.”

Everton manager Sean Dyche has admitted the club’s 10-point deduction may have had a psychological effect on his players.

The Toffees are still awaiting the outcome of their appeal against the punishment they received for breaching the Premier League’s financial regulations last November.

The sanction has effectively plunged the Merseyside club into a relegation battle and Dyche feels the uncertainty over whether or not they will get any points back could be having an impact.

Dyche told a number of national newspapers: “It affects everyone – everyone is sitting around waiting and wondering.

“They take those 10 points off immediately, so you keep looking at that table and you keep getting asked about being in the bottom three, four, five. They don’t leave you up there, so how do we know how that affects the psychology?

“It changes the perception, it changes the feel, it changes the fan base, it changes the feel of performances. That’s just a fact. We all measure it differently when the team are there, top, middle or bottom.

“Does that affect the team whilst the process is going? At first everyone says obviously not because you win four, but you could argue there is a delayed effect.”

Everton’s appeal hearing was held at the end of last month and a verdict is now thought to be imminent but no exact date has been set for when it will be delivered.

“We haven’t got a clue, or I certainly haven’t at the moment,” said Dyche at a press conference.

“The guidelines that you (the media) suggest and we suggest have been for around about the end of the month, so we just have to wait and see.

“I don’t know all the legalities of appeals, of course, but I think it’s in everyone’s interest, firstly our own of course, and for the greater good of football – I think everyone’s wondering – it would be helpful if it’s sooner rather than later.”

After initially responding well to the points setback, Everton are now without a win in eight Premier League games.

They are above the relegation zone only on goal difference after a 1-1 draw with Crystal Palace on Monday.

Dyche, whose side travel to Brighton on Saturday, has at least been pleased with the attitude of his players throughout a troubled period.

He said: “I think the players have been working very hard, very diligently. I’m very pleased with what they’re doing on a daily basis. I don’t think it is literally in the way of every day’s business.

“I’m sure at the back of their minds they’re still wondering, ‘Come on then, when are you going to tell us where we’re at and give us more of a factual kind of view?’, but we’re in the same mindset – it is where it is and that’s it.

“We look at where it is now and then see what comes. We can’t do anything about it until it’s done.”

Everton manager Sean Dyche says the club remain in the dark as to when they will hear the outcome of their appeal against their 10-point deduction.

The Toffees received the sanction for breaching the Premier League’s financial regulations last November and their appeal against the punishment was heard at the end of January.

That verdict is now thought to be imminent but no exact date has been set for when it will be delivered.

“We haven’t got a clue, or I certainly haven’t at the moment,” said Dyche at a press conference.

“The guidelines that you (the media) suggest and we suggest have been for around about the end of the month, so we just have to wait and see.

“I don’t know all the legalities of appeals, of course, but I think it’s in everyone’s interest, firstly our own of course, and for the greater good of football – I think everyone’s wondering – it would be helpful if it’s sooner rather than later.

“But, as I said, I don’t know how the legal process, the timescales and why it takes so long. So we’ll just have to wait and see.”

The points deduction means Everton are now facing another relegation battle. After a 1-1 draw with Crystal Palace on Monday, they are above the bottom three only on goal difference.

The uncertainty does not end there with the club also facing a second charge of breaching financial regulations and a proposed takeover by 777 Partners proving a protracted affair.

Dyche said: “There hasn’t been much calm water since I’ve been at this club, that’s for sure – the odd week, and then another wave comes and hits you in the face. Let’s see how it tumbles forward.”

Dyche, whose side travel to Brighton on Saturday, has been pleased with the attitude of his players throughout a troubled period.

He said: “I think the players have been working very hard, very diligently. I’m very pleased with what they’re doing on a daily basis. I don’t think it is literally in the way of every day’s business.

“Of course, you still look at a league table that they adjusted immediately and took 10 points away – we don’t know whether that 10 points is fact.

“I’m sure at the back of their minds they’re still wondering, ‘Come on then, when are you going to tell us where we’re at and give us more of a factual kind of view?’, but we’re in the same mindset – it is where it is and that’s it.

“We look at where it is now and then see what comes. We can’t do anything about it until it’s done. “If we had a million conversations, it’s not going to change what’s happening in an appeal process. Unfortunately that process has taken some time.”

Crystal Palace caretaker manager Paddy McCarthy believes new boss Oliver Glasner will have seen plenty to excite him in the Eagles’ battling 1-1 draw at Everton.

Hours after being confirmed as the successor to veteran Roy Hodgson, who stood down earlier in the day, Glasner was watching from the stand at Goodison Park as Palace claimed a point on Monday night.

McCarthy, who took charge of the side along with fellow assistant Ray Lewington after Hodgson was taken ill last week, feels the team being handed over is in fine shape.

McCarthy said: “He’s seen a team with spirit and commitment to the cause. It’s a good point in the right direction at a difficult place to come.

“I’m sure he will take a lot of positives from the game and I bet he can’t wait to come and work with the lads.”

Glasner, 49, inherits a side 15th in the Premier League and hoping to avoid being pulled into a relegation battle after a poor run of form.

The Austrian led Eintracht Frankfurt to Europa League glory in 2022 and McCarthy feels he is a strong appointment.

The Irishman said: “He is a manager with great pedigree, a European winner. He is coming into a group that I’m sure he will enjoy working with.

“It is a positive move for the football club and one I’m sure will excite the fans.”

McCarthy revealed he had not yet had the chance to meet Glasner and admitted he did not know if he himself had a future at Selhurst Park.

He said: “It was just announced as we arrived for our pre-match meal. I’ve not had chance to meet him.

“It has been a whirlwind couple of days. I’ve had no communication about myself and my future.”

In terms of the game, a dull encounter was lit up when Jordan Ayew broke the deadlock with a superb long-range strike after 66 minutes.

Everton responded well and their pressure eventually paid off when Amadou Onana headed an equaliser six minutes from time.

McCarthy said: “We created some great situations, Jordan took his goal well. We knew the questions that would be asked coming here.

“I thought we defended resolutely for the majority of the game but unfortunately we couldn’t hang on.”

Everton manager Sean Dyche bemoaned the number of chances the hosts wasted but nevertheless felt the point, which lifted the Toffees out of the bottom three, was a valuable one.

Dyche said: “First half it looked like we were off and they were a side where the new manager was sitting in the stand. They had a bit of edge about them and they played well.

“We weren’t miles off but we weren’t brave enough in possession, were too timid, played backwards too much.

“They scored a good goal, a clean strike, but I thought the mentality then was good to get on the front foot. We certainly did enough to get a point and it was a fine delivery and a fine finish.

“It’s another point on the board and we’ve just popped out of the relegation zone but there were chances – we’ve got to start taking them. There were a couple of golden chances we didn’t take.”

Pep Guardiola felt his side had come through a tough game after grinding out a 2-0 victory over Everton on Saturday.

Erling Haaland struck twice in the latter stages to secure a hard-fought Premier League success for the champions at the Etihad Stadium.

It was City’s 10th successive triumph in all competitions and Guardiola said the manner of the win would stand them in good stead as they chase a repeat treble.

The City manager said: “I love to win this type of game. The difficulty is there. We knew it, we talked about it.

“Always Everton here at home is really complicated. We’ve lost a lot of points over many years.

“What pleased me the most is something the people cannot see – the body shape, the positivity, the body language.

“In the first half we were complaining. I know a 12.30 (kick-off) is more difficult but our body language was not good. The chemistry between the players, when they lose a ball or something is not going well, has to be better.

“But in the second half it was much better. In general it was well deserved.

“I like to win this type of game – suffering and knowing how difficult everything is – because we learn the lessons for what’s coming.”

With Haaland and Kevin De Bruyne, who have both had lengthy lay-offs this season, now back in tandem and the rest of the squad fully fit, City’s momentum could be ominous for their rivals.

After last season’s achievements, doubts were cast over City’s durability as they stuttered in the autumn but Guardiola never had any concerns.

He said: “With Erling and Kevin we are stronger, that’s obvious, but when a team loses the consistency, we have to be worried with the way they train, behave and run.

“But it (good attitude) was always there. When that happens the team is alive. I was never concerned. Since day one I didn’t have the feeling.

“There are ups and downs, it’s normal, but I still liked what I saw.”

The defeat left Everton in the bottom three and without a league win in almost two months.

Manager Sean Dyche accepted his side had been beaten by a master finisher in Haaland, who broke the deadlock on 71 minutes and then wrapped up victory five minutes from time.

Dyche said: “That’s why he is who he is. He doesn’t have many touches in some games but he scores and that is the key.

“His finish for the first one – I have been speaking to the players recently about this – footballers scoring ‘trendy’ goals – whippers, dippers, clippers.

“He doesn’t think about that. Just score a goal. That’s the trendiest thing you’ll ever do. And he showed that, a good technique. Just smash it and don’t worry about anything else.”

Everton defender Jarrad Branthwaite’s added-time header snatched a 2-2 draw against Tottenham to spoil two-goal Richarlison’s return to Goodison Park.

The visitors appeared on course to make it six wins in seven after quality strikes from the Brazil international, only for the Toffees’ 21-year-old centre-back, one of their players of the season, to pop up at the far post with his first goal of the campaign.

A point was as much a reward for Sean Dyche’s side’s determination as it was a punishment for Spurs not finishing off their opponents when they had the chance.

Richarlison chose not to celebrate his eighth and ninth goals in the last eight league matches in deference to fans who less than two years ago adored him for the part he played in their first escape against relegation.

But there were wild scenes in the fourth minute of additional time when Tottenham defender Cristian Romero could only flick on James Garner’s inswinging free-kick and Branthwaite ghosted in to nod past Guglielmo Vicario, who endured a difficult afternoon dealing with Everton’s set-pieces.

Dominic Calvert-Lewin’s struggles also continued as he thought he had ended a 17-game drought extending back to October by nodding in from close range for the Toffees’ first equaliser only for the goal to be credited to Jack Harrison just before the start of the second half.

There were no such doubts about Richarlison’s well-taken goals; the first after four minutes when he swept home a volley after Idrissa Gana Gueye – injuries meaning he went came straight back in the side following Senegal’s African Nations Cup exit – had allowed Destiny Udogie to run beyond him to collect Timo Werner’s pass.

But instead of pressing home their early advantage Spurs were pushed back, with Harrison’s embarrassment at missing from a couple of yards spared by an offside flag.

Everton’s best opportunities came from set-pieces, particularly with Dwight McNeil targeting Vicario with inswinging corners from the right.

It was one of those which eventually paid off as Vicario, under pressure from Garner, failed to deal with a corner under his own crossbar and James Tarkowski headed back across goal for Calvert-Lewin to nod in.

Or so he thought until intervention from the Premier League’s goal accreditation panel.

Blissfully unaware the Everton striker now had a spring in his step and only just failed to get on the end of a Harrison cross having been crowded out by centre-backs Cristian Romero and Micky van der Ven.

Everton were actually in the ascendency when Richarlison put Spurs ahead again; James Maddison and Werner combined down the left with the latter teeing up the Brazilian who, with Harrison slow to react, had time to curl a shot across and beyond Jordan Pickford.

Vicario’s legs blocked Ben Godfrey’s header and Vitalii Mykolenko’s volley was parried late in the half but Tottenham’s momentum continued after the break with Werner denied by Pickford in a one-on-one only to be flagged offside.

Pickford made a better save when it mattered to deny Richarlison his hat-trick and the visitors should have put the game beyond doubt.

That they did not should have seen Youssef Chermiti make them pay only for him to stab a shot straight at Vicario and, after fellow substitute Beto had two penalty claims turned down, up stepped Branthwaite to deliver the painful blow.

Everton are still without a league win since mid-December but the manner in which they secured a point should do wonders for morale. However, a trip to Manchester City now awaits.

Sean Dyche says Everton remain focused on their appeal against the points deduction they were given in November after it emerged they could be hit with another sanction.

The Premier League on Monday said Everton and Nottingham Forest had confirmed that they had breached profitability and sustainability rules (PSR) for the assessment period up to and including the 2022-23 season, with separate commissions set to determine sanctions.

Everton are already appealing against a 10-point penalty imposed two months ago relating to a PSR breach in the period ending in 2021-22.

Asked at a press conference ahead of Wednesday’s FA Cup third-round replay against Crystal Palace how concerned he was about the prospect of another points deduction, Toffees boss Dyche said: “Because of the first situation, I think we’re all wondering.

“I don’t know what the outcome is going to be. The appeal is the first thing, our focus remains on the appeal from the last part of it, and see where that takes us. I think that’s all we can do.”

Everton will appeal against the controversial red card shown to Dominic Calvert-Lewin during Thursday’s FA Cup third-round draw with Crystal Palace.

The striker faces a three-match ban having been dismissed for a sliding studs-up challenge on Nathaniel Clyne following a VAR review during the second half of the goalless stalemate.

Referee Chris Kavanagh initially did not even give a free-kick but was sent to review the incident on the pitchside monitor and decided the challenge was worthy of a dismissal.

The decision was widely criticised and a Toffees statement read: “Everton have today notified the FA of their decision to appeal against the red card issued to Dominic Calvert-Lewin in our FA Cup third-round fixture at Crystal Palace on Thursday evening.”

Everton manager Sean Dyche said after Thursday’s contest that he “remained a fan” of VAR but admitted it was “beginning to test (his) patience”.

Kavanagh initially allowed play to carry on but was summoned to the monitor by VAR Craig Pawson and, after reviewing the footage multiple times, determined Calvert-Lewin deserved the first sending-off of his career.

Dyche questioned the protracted process, saying: “I have no clue what that’s there for. I hope I’m not just speaking for myself but every fan must go, ‘what is the point?’, because we all know the outcome which is that they agree with everything that they’re told, unless someone can tell me 10 incidents that aren’t.

“I don’t know what the stats are but the chances of something getting turned over are miniscule so don’t bother. Let’s just get on with it, afterwards we might debate it but what’s the point in doing it there and then unless you change it?”

If the decision is not overturned, Calvert-Lewin faces missing the third-round replay as well as Premier League matches against Aston Villa and Fulham.

A Goodison Park replay is the last thing Dyche or Palace boss Roy Hodgson would have wanted.

The Eagles entered Thursday’s contest gradually emerging from an injury crisis that has plagued them since the summer, with Michael Olise once again ruled out with a hamstring issue after twice netting in their 3-1 victory over Brentford to snap an eight-game winless streak.

That victory also handed Hodgson’s side some breathing room, lifting them six points clear of Luton in the relegation zone after previously falling to within three of it.

Everton, meanwhile, have given themselves a fighting chance of staying up following their 10-point deduction, but remain just one place and point clear of the Hatters.

Everton will appeal against the controversial red card given to Dominic Calvert-Lewin in Thursday’s FA Cup third-round draw with Crystal Palace.

The striker faces a three-match ban having been dismissed for a sliding challenge on Nathaniel Clyne following a VAR review during the second half of the 0-0 stalemate.

Referee Chris Kavanagh initially did not even give a free-kick but was sent to review the incident on the pitchside monitor and decided the contact was enough to dismiss Calvert-Lewin.

The decision was widely criticised and a Toffees statement read: “Everton Football Club has today notified the FA of its decision to appeal the red card issued to Dominic Calvert-Lewin in our FA Cup third round fixture at Crystal Palace on Thursday evening.”

Everton manager Sean Dyche said he remained a fan of VAR but that the system was “beginning to test my patience”.

“I look at the obvious offsides, which I think is fair, that should be there,” said Dyche. “Some of the others I’m going, ‘Well, what’s got a chance now of being let play and what’s got a chance of being called’, but we don’t actually know.”

If the decision is not overturned, Calvert-Lewin faces missing the third-round replay as well as Premier League matches against Aston Villa and Fulham.

Everton boss Sean Dyche called for a “tidying up” of VAR following the controversial decision which saw Dominic Calvert-Lewin shown a straight red card late on in the goalless FA Cup third-round tie at Crystal Palace.

Nathaniel Clyne went down wincing following a sliding tackle by Calvert-Lewin, who appeared to catch the Palace defender’s shin with his studs.

Referee Chris Kavanagh went to review the incident on the pitchside monitor and decided the contact was enough to dismiss the Toffees striker, who was sent off for the first time in his career.

Dyche said: “It seems a bit confused at the moment. I said recently, we had another one, where I said I don’t know who is refereeing which. I am a fan, (but) I definitely think we’re all aware it needs tidying up.

“I thought it was getting tidied up, and then it seems to have stepped back a bit. I remain a fan at this stage,  but it is beginning to test my patience even,  because I look at the obvious offsides which I think is fair, that should be there, some of the others I’m going well, what’s got a chance now of being let play and what’s got a chance of being called, but we don’t actually know.”

Earlier, Dyche had lamented the decision to turn to VAR in the first place, suggesting the calls throughout the contest had perhaps been inconsistent after an Everton penalty shout went unanswered.

He told ITV: “If you want to slow-mo everything, then you have got to slow-mo everything – you can’t just have it one for one and one for the other.

“At the end of it is minor contact. In live time, he doesn’t give everything, then you slow it down – and everything looks worse on slow-mo, we all know that.”

Dyche revealed he had not ruled out appealing the decision, saying: “I’ll double-check the process.

“Yet again it’s one of them risk-and-reward things. Is it worth it, is it not worth it. I don’t think anyone knows what’s going to happen with these decisions now.

“We’ll see, we’ll analyse it, we’ll get an outside view and then we will decide.”

Palace boss Roy Hodgson could understand his counterpart’s frustration, but stopped short of criticising the decision to dismiss Calvert-Lewin.

He said: “I mean Sean comes from a type of football, was brought up in a type of football where those sort of challenges were pretty commonplace and they weren’t punished if people got the ball.

“We now live in a slightly different world I think, and that is if you go into challenges with a straight leg and you have a bit of intent behind it, there’s a risk.

“There was definitely no malicious intent from Calvert-Lewin, there’s no question of that, not from seeing it back, it’s just a situation of an interpretation these days of a challenge, and the interpretation unfortunately can be that if you’re straight-legged and your foot is off the ground as you go into a challenge it can be deemed a red card.

“So have I got sympathy for him? Yes I have.”

Everton boss Sean Dyche hit out at the “slow-mo” VAR decision which saw Dominic Calvert-Lewin shown a straight red card late on in the goalless FA Cup third-round tie at Crystal Palace.

Nathaniel Clyne went down wincing following a sliding tackle by Calvert-Lewin, who appeared to catch the Palace defender’s shin with his studs.

Referee Chris Kavanagh went to review the incident on the pitchside monitor and decided the contact was enough to dismiss the Toffees striker, who was sent off for the first time in his career.

Dyche, though, was again unimpressed by the VAR intervention.

“I think slow-mo shows a different picture,” he told ITV Sport.

“If you are going to slow-mo things, then you are going to have to slow-mo the penalty on Beto or what could have been a penalty.

“(Joachim) Andersen has got his arms clearly around him, cupping his body. He goes down and it is not given.

“So if you want to slow-mo everything, then you have got to slow-mo everything – you can’t just have it one for one and one for the other.

“At the end of it is minor contact. In live time, he doesn’t give everything, then you slow it down – and everything looks worse on slow-mo, we all know that.”

Dyche said Everton would consider whether to appeal the red card, but felt his side had put up a decent display in the circumstances.

“There is a lot of satisfaction,” the Everton boss said.

“I thought we were back up to the performance levels we have shown this season, particularly away from home. Even when we went down to 10, the mentality was good.”

Crystal Palace and Everton will replay their FA Cup third-round clash after their Selhurst Park encounter ended in a goalless draw.

The Toffees were down to 10 men after Dominic Calvert-Lewin was shown red for a challenge in the 79th minute of a contest that began under a south London downpour.

Those who braved the rain took in a largely uneventful first half that ended with a single shot on target for the visitors and none for the hosts.

Palace could not capitalise on the extra-man advantage through nine minutes of stoppage time, the visitors suffering a second-half blow when Dwight McNeil was carried off on a stretcher after sustaining what appeared to be a lower-leg injury.

Both Sean Dyche and Roy Hodgson fielded strong line-ups ,with three changes for Everton and two enforced swaps for Palace with Ghana international Jordan Ayew having already departed for the Africa Cup of Nations.

Teenage summer signing Matheus Franca made his long-awaited first start the hosts in place of  Michael Olise, back on Hodgson’s injured list with a hamstring issue sustained after netting twice in the Eagles’ 3-1 victory over Brentford.

It was Ayew’s replacement, Jeffrey Schlupp, who was the first to get a shot away, ultimately a simple save for Joao Virginia inside three minutes, and there were little in the way of chances as the contest entered its 20th minute.

Arnaut Danjuma, who had previously fired into the side-netting, came closer with his second attempt which Dean Henderson managed to turn behind with a good save.

Franca later found himself the sole blue shirt amidst a sea of grey, eventually taking a big hit from James Tarkowski to earn Palace a free-kick from a dangerous central position just outside the penalty area, wasted by Eberechi Eze who skied his attempt into the Holmesdale Stand.

Palace had their best opportunity to take the lead when Eze laid off to Jefferson Lerma, who might have taken more time, instead rifling a shot just over as half-time approached.

Everton enjoyed a spell inside the Eagles’ final third after the break, but it was Palace who had the better chances to break the deadlock, first through Eze then Lerma’s nodded effort, both saved by Virginia.

Calvert-Lewin sent a low effort straight at Henderson past the hour mark and a trio of Toffees corners shortly followed, Amadou Onana coming closest on the third but nodding high.

If anyone looked closer to an opener it was Everton with the slight edge, Henderson punching away McNeil’s chipped ball, then again denying Danjuma.

Hodgson’s side were emerging from a significant injury crisis when they beat Brentford, and there were more worrying scenes for the hosts when Nathaniel Clyne went down wincing following a tackle by Calvert-Lewin, who appeared to catch the Palace defender’s shin with his studs.

Referee Chris Kavanagh consulted the pitchside monitor, deeming the contact enough to dismiss the striker before James Garner skied a good chance.

Things went from bad to worse when McNeil was forced off with what appeared to be a lower-leg injury when he landed awkwardly after jumping over his team-mate whilst defending a corner and was eventually carried off on a stretcher.

Hodgson made several late changes, but none were able to make the impact needed.

Richarlison scored for the third consecutive match to haunt old club Everton and ensure Tottenham would spend Christmas in the Premier League’s top four thanks to a hard-fought 2-1 home win.

It was harsh on Sean Dyche’s visitors, who created the better of the chances in the capital and crucially had a Dominic Calvert-Lewin effort ruled out following a VAR review in the 51st minute which could have changed the complexion of the match.

Everton also hit the crossbar deep into added time through substitute Arnaut Danjuma, whose effort was then cleared by goalkeeper Guglielmo Vicario before it could cross the line. Although the offside flag was raised, the goal would have been given on VAR review as Danjuma was marginally onside.

Those missed chances cost the away side and enabled Ange Postecoglou’s team make it three wins in a row after first-half goals by Richarlison and Son Heung-min, with Andre Gomes’ late effort a mere consolation.

Dyche’s team had won their last four league fixtures and started well in north London, with the fit-again Vitalii Mykolenko testing Vicario early on before Cristian Romero slide in to deny Calvert-Lewin.

It had been a sloppy opening period from Postecoglou’s men, but an Everton old boy corrected that in the ninth minute.

A slick team move saw Pape Sarr play in Brennan Johnson down the right and his cross was perfect for Richarlison, who flicked home impressively at the near post before declining to properly celebrate against his former team.

Everton responded well to going behind, with Dwight McNeil dragging an effort wide and Calvert-Lewin having a header excellently tipped wide by Vicario before Tottenham punished their profligacy again with 18 minutes played.

A short corner routine did the trick, with Pedro Porro slipping the ball through to Johnson, who was denied by Jordan Pickford, but Son was on hand to scramble home from eight yards.

It was Son’s 11th Premier League goal of the campaign, which bettered his tally from last season, and Everton’s problems increased when Idrissa Gueye limped off soon after.

Spurs were in control by this point and almost produced a couple of wonderful team goals but allowed sloppiness to creep in towards the end of the half.

The hosts did not heed their warning, but made it through to half-time with a two-goal advantage after Vicario denied James Garner and Jack Harrison in quick succession.

Everton’s pressure continued, though, and they thought the deficit had been reduced in the 51st minute, only for VAR to intervene.

Substitute Gomes won back possession from Emerson Royal and found Calvert-Lewin, who rifled home, but referee Stuart Attwell was told to review the incident.

Replays on the pitchside monitor showed Gomes had caught Emerson’s left ankle and, while the contact was soft, it was deemed enough to disallow the effort.

Another chance was squandered when Garner dragged wide from Harrison’s delicious outside-of-the-boot pass and Postecoglou had seen enough, with Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg introduced for Richarlison with 27 minutes left.

It worked initially and Dejan Kulusevski almost put the game to bed in the 75th minute, but Pickford produced a superb finger-tip save.

With eight minutes left the Toffees broke through when Garner’s corner was cleared to Gomes and he lashed home for his first Everton goal in 18 months.

It could have been 2-2 minutes later when ex-Spurs loanee Arnaut Danjuma let fly, but his deflected left-foot strike was brilliantly pushed over by Vicario.

Six minutes were added on and Everton were camped in the hosts’ half, but in the dying moments Danjuma could only volley against the crossbar and watch as the ball agonisingly failed to completely cross the line before Vicario cleared.

Everton manager Sean Dyche insists he is more concerned with the mentality shown by players in choosing to take a penalty in a shoot-out than he is by the style employed.

The Toffees exited the Carabao Cup on spot-kicks for the fourth time in six years after Amadou Onana’s weak, placed effort to put them through with their fifth and final regulation effort was saved by Fulham’s Bernd Leno.

Idrissa Gana Gueye hit the post in sudden death and Tosin Adarabioyo scored to send the Cottagers into their first League Cup semi-final 7-6 in the shoot-out, after Toffees substitute Beto’s 82nd-minute equaliser had cancelled out Michael Keane’s first-half own goal.

“Everyone has a style of penalty which they think can score. His record has been very strong in all the rounds and when we’ve practised them. That’s his style,” said Dyche of Onana’s disappointing effort.

“If you are brave enough to get up there and take one then you have to be brave enough for the consequences.

“The first question is always who doesn’t want to take one. Simple as that because you need to want to take one. I’m pleased to say the whole group said they would take one.

“It is the moment of truth: the ball’s there, you have to put it in the net.”

Fulham offered little in the way of attacking threat – their only shot on target did not arrive until the 68th minute – but head coach Marco Silva was pleased with the way his side responded to conceding a late equaliser.

“We are all delighted, no doubts about it,” said the former Everton manager, who ended his old club’s four-match winning run.

“It was a huge moment from Bernd when he kept us in the game with the fifth penalty from Onana.

“I am really delighted because it is not easy to keep the composure and quality in the penalty shoot-out.

“We achieved something the club never did in the past. We want more but we are really delighted for this evening and the moment we are living.

“We are going to play the semi-finals with the dream to play at Wembley.”

Sean Dyche was delighted with a couple of Everton’s fringe players after they stepped up to deliver in Saturday’s 2-0 Premier League win over his old club Burnley.

Former Claret Michael Keane scored Everton’s second in his first appearance since October 21, while alongside him in defence Ben Godfrey – making his first Premier League start of the season – made a vital block to prevent the Clarets getting back into it just before half-time.

Dyche said he had been forced to change his game plan significantly on Friday morning after Vitaliy Mykolenko joined the list of absentees but said the way his players responded showed they had bought into the system he and his staff are implementing.

“It’s something we built over my time here, not just me, the staff have been working really hard with the players to let them know the respect we have when they’re not in the side,” Dyche said.

“I’ve always thought the strongest groups I’ve played with or worked with are the people outside the starting 11 because they keep you strong, because they’re not just accepting it.

“I don’t mind players being disgruntled and asking me questions, but when it comes to your training do it right, do it properly and it will pay you back – and it is. There are people having to come in who haven’t played in a while but they’re coming and delivering.”

Those fringe players could be vital over the busy festive period, with Everton next facing a Carabao Cup quarter-final against Fulham on Tuesday. Abdoulaye Doucoure could be an injury doubt for that match after being replaced at half-time at Turf Moor with tightness in his hamstring.

For Burnley, who are among the sides Everton have beaten to reach the last eight in the League Cup, Saturday’s defeat left them with only eight points from 17 games, off the foot of the table on goal difference alone.

There were more encouraging signs in the performance but they were undone by two set-plays, with Amadou Onana allowed too much space to head in the opener from a corner, while Keane’s goal came as a result of a long free-kick pumped forward by Jordan Pickford.

It was another frustrating day at Turf Moor but the big positive was the return of Lyle Foster, who made his first appearance since October 21, coming on as a half-time substitute following time away to receive help with mental health issues.

Kompany welcomed the 23-year-old back but added a note of caution, saying this was only part of a process.

“We follow what the medical experts say,” Kompany said. “It’s step by step, it’s a small environment, it’s being with the team, being with the people he considers his friends. Keeping a very, very small world for him and that seems to put him in a good place. This is just part of his recovery as well.”

During the week, before it was known that Foster would play, Kompany had insisted the South Africa forward would not be available for the Africa Cup of Nations despite having been named in a 50-man provisional squad for the tournament that starts on January 13. That has not changed.

“It’s not even my decision – it’s not up to me,” he said. “We just can’t. It’s the medical advice we’re getting at the moment.

“The conflict of course is he loves to play for his country and from my side, I think AFCON is a big trophy, it’s a big competition, it’s important for me as an African coach to support the competition but it’s not up to me.

“We’ve done everything for the human being to this point, there’s no reason to change all of a sudden now.”

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