200m World Champions Noah Lyles and Shericka Jackson headline several stars expected to participate in the return of the Racers Grand Prix on June 3 at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Lyles broke Michael Johnson's long-standing American Record when he sped to 19.31 to win gold in Oregon last year while Jackson ran 21.45 to her first World title, becoming the fastest woman alive in the process.

The World Athletics Tour-Gold meet is happening for the first time since 2019, with the three-year hiatus being attributed to the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It is with great enthusiasm that I can announce the return of the Racers Grand Prix,” said Racers Track Club President and Head Coach Glen Mills at the official launch of the meet at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel on Tuesday.

“It is a meet you don’t want to miss. Three-and-a-half hours of pulsating action in 12 events,” added Mills who also serves as director for the meet.

The meet will host over 150 athletes from all over the world including the likes of reigning 100m hurdles World Champion and World Record holder Tobi Amusan of Nigeria, Olympic Champion and 400m World Record holder Wayde Van Niekerk of South Africa and British European 200m Champion Zharnel Hughes to name a few.

The future of Jamaican sprinting will also be on display at the National Stadium including the likes of World Championship finalist Oblique Seville, World Junior Champions Tina Clayton and Kerrica Hill as well as National Under-20 100m Record holder Bouwahjgie Nkrumie.

The field events also promise to be exciting for the fans with the likes of 2019 World Championship gold medallist Tajay Gayle and silver medallists Shanieka Ricketts and Fedrick Dacres set to showcase their skills.

“Over the four years of staging the Grand Prix, the standard and quality has been unquestionable and the meet has had some of the greatest athletes in track and field taking part here in Jamaica,” Mills said.

The 12 events set to be contested are the 100m (Men and Women), 200m (Men), 400m (Men and Women), 400m hurdles (Women), 100m hurdles (Women), 110m hurdles (Men), Triple Jump (Women), High Jump (Women), Long Jump (Men) and Discus (Men).

The meet is scheduled to get underway at 6:30pm Jamaica time (7:30pm ECT).

Tickets go on sale in the first week of May. Prices will be announced at a later date.

Kingston College and Hydel High emerged as the respective Boys and Girls title as the 2023 ISSA Grace Kennedy Boys and Girls Championships came to an end at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

For KC, it is a second consecutive title and their 34th overall while for Hydel, it is a first title breaking an incredibly dominant eight-year run for Edwin Allen.

KC finished with 366 points, comfortably ahead of runner-up Jamaica College (299 points) while the top five was rounded out by Calabar (207 points), St. Jago (118.5 points) and STETHS (116 points).

Hydel finished with 279 points to top the Girls standings by only two points ahead of former champions Edwin Allen while the rest of the top five was rounded out by Holmwood Technical (202 points), St. Jago High (178 points) and St. Catherine High (116 points).

Some of the standout performances on the final day included Calabar’s Shaquane Gordon complete the Class 2 100m-110m hurdles double by running 13.42 to claim gold ahead of KC’s Kahiem Carby (13.59) and Daniel Clarke (13.80).

St. Jago secured the top two places in the Class 1 final through Demario Prince (13.42) and Andre Harris (13.79) while JC’s Daniel Beckford ran 13.83 for third.

St. Jago also had success in the Class 3 100m hurdles as Marquies Page ran 13.38 for victory ahead of Vere Technical’s Shawn Palmer (13.40) and St. George’s College’s Jahzi Walters (13.62).

World Under-20 silver medallist Alexis James of Petersfield ran 13.39 for victory in the Girls Class 1 100m hurdles ahead of St. Catherine High’s Asharria Ulett (13.59) and Edwin Allen’s Tonie-Ann Forbes (13.61).

In Class 2, Hydel’s Jody-Ann Daley completed an unprecedented 400m, 100m hurdles double by running 13.70 for victory ahead of St. Jago’s Bryana Davidson (13.89) and Excelsior’s Shelley-Ann Taylor (13.92).

The Class 3 80m hurdles was won by Wolmer’s Girls’ Tiana Marshall in 11.29. St. Catherine’s Akeelah Ellis ran 11.48 for second while Edwin Allen’s Angel Robinson ran 11.52 for third.

Wolmer’s Girls also took top spot in the Class 4 70m hurdles through Jadea Harris who ran 11.05 to narrowly beat Immaculate’s Ayanna Blake (11.08) while Excelsior’s Cordelia Gabbidon ran 11.30 for third.

In the field, KC’s Daijon Budhai threw 47.40m for gold in the Class 2 Boys discus ahead of Denzel Phillips of JC (45.98m) and Clarendon College’s Jospeh Salmon (43.33m).

JC’s Jaidi James took gold in the Class 2 Boys high jump with a clearance of 1.95m. Jonathan Grant’s Michael Neil was second with 1.90m while Kabiki Thomas of Wolmer’s Boys was third with 1.90m.

Three men were clear of 2.05m in the Class 1 Boys high jump, with KC’s Aaron McKenzie coming out on top ahead of JC’s Chavez Penn and St. Mary High’s Ovane Williams.

Moving into the 4x100m relays, the Class 1 Boys event was won by overall champions Kingston College in 40.01 ahead of St. Jago (40.40) and Edwin Allen (40.59).

Calabar took the crown in Class 2 in 40.41 ahead of KC (40.58) and St. Elizabeth Technical (40.74) while St. Jago won in Class 3 in 43.11 ahead of Wolmer’s Boys (43.12) and KC (43.21).

Hydel ran 44.33 for victory in the Girls Class 1 Girls final ahead of Edwin Allen (44.77) and Holmwood Technical (45.71).

Class 2 also saw Hydel take the title in 45.01 ahead of St. Jago (45.95) and Holmwood Technical (46.43).

Wolmer’s Girls continued their excellent Class 3 showing at the championships by winning the final in 45.81 ahead of Excelsior (46.41) and Edwin Allen (46.72).

Mount Alvernia won an extremely exciting Class 4 final in 48.54 ahead of Holmwood Technical (48.59) and St. Jago (48.83).

In the final Girls event of the championships, Edwin Allen won in 3:31.78 ahead of Hydel (3:34.57) and Holmwood Technical (3:36.46).  Hydel entered the race with a four-point lead over Edwin Allen knowing a medal would secure their maiden hold on the title.

Jamaica College ran 3:09.31 to win the Boys 4x400m ahead of Edwin Allen (3:10.09) and Kingston College (3:11.46).

Jamaica College’s Malique Smith-Band and Hydel’s Alana Reid took home the Class 1 200m titles on the fifth and final day of the ISSA Boys and Girls Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Smith-Band added to his silver medal performance in the 400m by producing his second personal best at the championships, 20.90, to win the title ahead of St. Elizabeth Technical’s Javorne Dunkley (21.40) and teammate Jaiden Reid (21.52).

The Class 2 Boys crown was taken by KC’s Tahj-Marques White, who ran 21.44 to complete the 200m-400m double. White’s teammate Nyrone Wade was second in 21.96 while Ainsley McGregor of Wolmer’s Boys ran the same time as Wade for third.

100m bronze medallist Shaun Lewis of STETHS went two better to win gold in the Class 3 final ahead of St. Jago’s Rayj Reece (22.93) and Calabar’s 400m champion Christopher Ellis (23.20).

Hydel’s Reid, who smashed Veronica Campbell’s Class 1 100m record when she ran a national junior record 10.92 to win the 100m on Wednesday, completed the sprint double with a 23.08 effort on Saturday. Wolmer’s Girls’ Mickayla Gardner was second in 23.89 and Holmwood Technical’s 400m champion Rickiann Russell was third in 24.16.

The Class 2 Girls final was won by Hydel’s Shemonique Hazle in 24.36, the same time as Lacovia’s Sabrina Dockery in second while Bridgeport’s Brittney McCormack was third in 24.73.

Wolmer’s Girls’ Natrece East turned the tables on Edwin Allen’s Theianna-Lee Terrelonge in the Girls Class 3 final after Terrelonge got the better of her in the 100m. East ran 24.20 to win while Terrelonge ran 24.64 for second. Hydel’s Onetta Mitchell was third in 24.92.

Immaculate Conception’s Kayla Johnson completed the Class 4 sprint double with a winning time of 25.29 ahead of Hydel’s Gabrielle Morgan (25.54) and Clarendon College’s Tresha-Lee Sutherland (25.58).

At the time of publishing, Kingston College had a 41-point lead over Jamaica College after 32 events scored while, on the girls side, Edwin Allen had a one point lead over Hydel after 37 events scored.

 

 

Class One 100m favorites Bouwahjgie Nkrumie of Kingston College and Serena Cole of Edwin Allen both safely advanced from the preliminaries as the ISSA Boys and Girls Championships got underway at the National Stadium in Kingston on Tuesday.

Nkrumie, the national junior record holder and World Under-20 silver medallist, got left in the blocks but recovered well to win his heat in 10.51 ahead of St. Jago’s Tajai Duffus (10.88) and St. Catherine high’s Sajay Campbell (10.91) who both also advanced to the semis.

JC’s Caymanian junior record holder Jaiden Reid, who ran a new personal best 10.25 earlier this season, also secured a spot in the semis with 10.52 to advance second fastest overall.

The third fastest to advance was Camperdown’s Junior Harris who looked impressive for his 10.56 in the preliminary round.

Herbert Morrison’s De Andre Daley (10.65), STETHS’s Javorn Dunkley (10.59), JC’s Hector Benjamin (10.67), Manchester’s Javoon Blair (10.93) and Steer Town Academy’s Tay-Shawn Barnes (10.60) were the other heat winners.

The Class Two qualifiers were led by KC’s Nicardo Clarke (10.95), Herbert Morrison’s Class Three champion from last year Tavaine Stewart (11.00) and Muschett’s Johan-Ramaldo Smythe (11.02).

Pre-meet favorite Tramaine Todd of STETHS ran 11.09 to win his heat and safely advance while Calabar’s Shaquane Gordon is also through after an 11.10 clocking in his heat. Other heat winners included Calabar’s Khamani Gordon (11.34), St. Jago’s Detarje Morgan (11.11) and JC’s Dontae Watson (11.34),

In Class Three, JC’s Malique Dennis looked impressive running 11.06 to advance fastest ahead of STETHS’s Rodeeki Walters (11.54) and KC’s Jonathan Clarke (11.55). Other heat winners included STETHS’s Shaun Lewis (11.56), Cornwall College’s Thomas Daley (11.71), St. Jago’s Rayj Reece (11.64), Calabar’s Byron Walker (11.82) and St. Jago’s Kevon McKenzie (11.93).

On the Girls side, medal favourites Serena Cole, Alana Reid and Alexis James are all safely through to the semi-finals after convincing heat wins.

Edwin Allen’s Cole, the 2022 World Under-20 100m silver medallist, ran 11.57 to advance fastest ahead of Petersfield’s James, and Hydel’s Reid who ran 11.74 and 11.81 to win their respective heats. Other heat winners included Edwin Allen’s Tonie-Ann Forbes (11.80) and St. Catherine high’s Kamaria Knight (11.89). James and Reid also got medals at the World Under-20 Championships last year. James was runner-up in the 100m hurdles while Reid won bronze in the 200m.

Hydel’s Shemonique Hazle advanced fastest in Class Two with 12.17 ahead of St. Catherine’s Kaycian Johnson (12.19) and Edwin Allen’s Doniella Lewis (12.20). Other heat winners included 2021 Class Three double sprint champion Lavanya Williams of William Knibb (12.30), Bridgeport’s Brittney McCormack (12.24), Holmwood’s Akhalia Collins (12.24), Edwin Allen’s Renecia Edwards (12.26) and holy Childhood’s Abigail Wolfe (12.26).

Edwin Allen’s Theianna-Lee Terrelonge qualified fastest in Class Three with 12.10 ahead of St. Jago’s Poshanna-Lee Blake (12.47) and Vere Technical’s Tiana Oliver (12.53). Other heat winners included Natrece East of Wolmer’s (12.53), Excelsior’s Tashika Thompson (13.03), Immaculate Conception’s Kedoya Lindo (12.76), St. Jago’s Adora Campbell (12.69) and Excelsior’s Paris Pomings (12.67).

Class Four qualifiers were led by Maria Baker of Holmwood Technical (12.47), Giana Murray of Mount Alvernia High (12.62) and Naje’ Brown of Immaculate (12.65).

Moving on to the 400m, the JC pair of Malique Smith Band and Mark Anthony Miller led all qualifiers to the semi-finals for Class One Boys with times of 48.34 and 48.40, respectively.

Edwin Allen’s 2022 World Under-20 finalist Delano Kennedy also easily made it through to the semis with a 48.61 effort, closely followed by the KC pair Emmanuel Rwotomiya (48.89) and Amal Glasgow (49.13) as well as Jasauna Dennis of STETHS (49.31).

In Class Two, Daniel Francis of Alphansus Davis High was the fastest through to the semi-finals with 49.84. JC’s Tyler Ferguson and Holmwood Technical’s Omarie Williamson were the only others to dip below 50 seconds in the heats with 49.87 and 49.92, respectively.

Other qualifiers to semis included KC’s Tahj-Marques White (50.04) who won silver in the same event last year and Calabar’s Nickecoy Bramwell (50.46), who won silver in the 100m and gold in the 200m in Class Three at last year’s championships.

The Class Three qualifiers were led by KC’s Jordan Rehedul (51.63), Maggotty High’s Akeem Honeyghan (51.70) and Ferncourt’s Jevari McKoy (51.84). The Calabar pair of Christopher Ellis (52.56) and Malik Gayle (53.32) also made it through.

On the girls’ side, 2022 Class Three champion Sabrina Dockery of Lacovia ran 55.29 to advance fastest in the Class Two 400m. Holmwood Technical’s Rosalee Gallimore (55.70) and Hydel’s Jody-Ann Daley (55.71) made up the rest of the top three through to the semis.

In Class Three, Hydel’s Nastassia Fletcher (56.29), Excelsior’s Breana Brown (56.84) and Muschett’s Shanoya Douglas (56.90) led the qualifiers to the semis.

The Class One girls will only run semi-finals and finals.

Edwin Allen’s Tonyan Beckford (57.90), Hydel’s Onieka McAnnuff (58.24) and Holmwood’s Annalice Brady (59.50) were the fastest qualifiers into the final of the Girls Open 400m hurdles.

The Class Two qualifiers were led by JC’s Deandre Gayle (53.13), Calabar’s Requel Reid (53.21) and KC’s Taj-Oneil Gordon (54.49) while Class One was led by Edwin Allen’s Tyrece Hyman (51.26), STETHS’s Shamer Blake (51.63) and KC’s Antonio Forbes (52.80).

KC’s Ethan Gioko and Ainsley Campbell led the qualifiers for the final of the Class One 1500m. JC will also have two in the final as Kemarrio Bygrave and Nellie Amberton also made it through. Campbell and Amberton also qualified for the final of the 2000m steeplechase later in the day.

KC also had the top two qualifiers in Class Two through their Kenyan duo Nahashon Ruto and Brian Kiprop while Class Three was led by Edwin Allen’s Moses Johnson and Calabar’s Carlos Brison-Caines.

Alphansus Davis’ Alikay Reynolds and Edwin Allen’s Kevongaye Fowler led the qualifiers for Class Three girls. The Class Two and One races will be straight finals.

In the field, JC’s Uroy Ryan led all qualifiers to the final of the Class One long jump with a 7.35m effort in his first round.

The qualifiers for the Class Two final were led by JC’s Michael-Andre Edwards with 7.13m.

 

Holmwood Technical’s Cedricka Williams and St. Jago's Abigail Martin were both in record-breaking form on Tuesday's first day of the 2023 ISSA Grace Kennedy Boys and Girls Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Williams, a finalist at the World Under-20 Championships in Nairobi two years ago, threw 53.22m to break former Edwin Allen standout Fiona Richards' Class One discus record 53.04m, set in 2017, with her only throw in flight one of the preliminaries.

Her record would last only a few hours, however, as Martin broke Williams' record with a 55.19m effort in flight two, setting up an interesting clash between the two in the final.

National junior record holder Bouwahjgie Nkrumie ran an easy 10.19 to lead all qualifiers to the final of the Boy’s Under-20 100m on Friday’s day one of the 2023 Carifta Trials at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Kingston College’s Nkrumie, who ran 10.02 to win silver at the 2022 World Under-20 Championships behind Botswanan World junior record holder Letsile Tebogo, easily won the fourth heat ahead of Camperdown’s Jason Lewis who ran 10.57 to also qualify for the final.

Jamaica College’s Hector Benjamin advanced second fastest with a personal best 10.31 to win heat two ahead of defending champion DeAndre Daley of Herbert Morrison who also advanced with 10.56.

Daley’s day was almost disastrous as he was left in the blocks at the start of the heat but, thankfully, recovered to seal his spot in the final.

Manchester High’s Javoon Blair qualified third fastest with a 10.43 effort to win heat one ahead of Steer Town Academy’s Omarion Barrett (10.49).

Also advancing to Saturday’s final were Kingston College’s Yourie Lawrence-Clarke (10.55) and Steer Town Academy’s Tay-Shawn Barnes (10.56).

The qualifiers for the Under-17 final were led by STETHS’ Tramaine Todd, Calabar’s Khamani Gordon and Jamaica College’s Dontae Watson.

Todd looked extremely impressive, producing 10.59 to win his heat while Gordon and Watson produced times of 10.68 and 10.72 to win their respective heats and advance.

Joining them in the final will be Jamaica College’s Nathaniel Martin (10.69), St. Jago High’s Detarje Morgan (10.72), Herbert Morrison’s Tavaine Stewart (10.82), Calabar’s Jamal Stephenson (10.89) and Kingston College’s Kyle Bodden (10.95).

World Under-20 silver medallist Serena Cole of Edwin Allen led all qualifiers to the final of the girls Under-20 equivalent.

Cole ran a comfortable 11.22 to easily win her heat ahead of St. Catherine High’s Kaycian Johnson who also qualified with 11.91.

Petersfield’s Alexis James also looked in good form, running 11.24 to win her heat ahead of MVP’s Tia Clayton (11.53), Edwin Allen’s Tonie-Ann Forbes (11.59) and William Knibb’s Lavanya Williams (11.61). Clayton, Forbes and Williams all advanced to the final alongside James.

Hydel’s Alana Reid, World Under-20 bronze medallist, won her heat in 11.55 to advance while Wolmers’ Mickayla Gardener (11.65) finished second and made it through.

Natrece East of Wolmers ran 11.70 to lead all qualifiers to the Under-17 final. She will be joined in the final by the Hydel pair Shemonique Hazle (11.80) and Camoy Binger (12.00), Wolmers’ Tiana Marshall (11.77), Immaculate Conception’s Shevi-Anne Shim (11.94), St. Jago’s Adora Campbell (12.02), Excelsior’s Janiela Williams (11.95) and St Mary High’s Shagay Sheppy (12.02).

 

Akeem Blake and Tina Clayton won the respective 60m titles at the Gibson/McCook Relays at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

Clayton, a two-time World Junior 100m champion and in her first professional season, ran a personal best 7.02 to win the Women’s section ahead of Sashalee Forbes (7.03) and Kerrica Hill (7.10).

Remona Burchell won a windy B final in 7.04 ahead of Tia Clayton (7.05) and Jodean Williams (7.16).

Blake, a semi-finalist in the 100m at the 2022 World Championships, ran a personal best 6.42 to win the Men’s section ahead of Oblique Seville (6.42) and Zharnel Hughes (6.45). 2011 World 100m Champion Yohan Blake was fourth in 6.45.

Briana Williams will race over 60m at the Camperdown Classic at the National Stadium on Saturday in what will be her first official competition since she joined Titans International in September 2022.

Williams, who turns 21, next month boasts a personal best of 7.04 while finishing fifth in the 60m final at the World Indoor Championships in Serbia in March, 2022.

It was a significant improvement on the 7.18 she ran at the Armory in New York in February 2020. Her outdoor 60m best of 7.15 was set at the National Stadium in Kingston in January that year.

The Tokyo Olympics gold medallist had trained with Coach Ato Boldon for a decade before making the move to Titans International last year citing a need for a change.

“I’m excited about this new chapter and happy to be training in Jamaica,” Williams said following the move to the club where she now trains under the guidance of coaches Gregory Little and Olympian Michael Frater.

 

After the Camperdown Classic, Williams is set to compete next at the Gibson Relays set to the final Saturday, February 25.

The 2023 Gibson McCook Relays will take place at the National Stadium in Kingston on February 25.

The meet is celebrating 50 years of existence and will return with 43 events in a 12-hour extravaganza.  

PUMA, Television Jamaica, Wisynco and Digicel are the major sponsors along with 28 other business partners which have covered all 45 events for the meet. 

Chairman of the Organizing Committee, Prof Rainford Wilks in expressing his delight is excited about two new events.

“The 60 meters open for Elite Men and Women should add to the thrill of the meet. We are also pleased with the planning for the milestone event.” 

Back to its original schedule, which sees the meet starting at 9:00 am the morning session will have 20 heats and five finals up to 2:30; while in the afternoon session 40 finals are set to start from 4:00 pm. 

The meet, known for its on time running, sees the last event the 4 X 400 meters High School Boys go off at 9pm. 

The World’s fastest man, Dr the Hon Usain Bolt is the patron for the meet. At a press briefing, Bolt expressed his undying love for Jamaica and reflected on his own performances at the meet. Bolt last competed at that event in 2017 for the Racers Track Club en route to the World Championship in London the same year. 

This year's staging continues with a full week of activities including a Church Service on February 19, the Howard Aris Memorial Lecture at UTECH on February 21 and an Awards Banquet at the Jamaica Pegasus on February 23 before the meet on February 25 at the National Stadium.

Tickets go on sale on Monday, February 20 at the ticket office at the National Stadium. Two categories are available for the grandstand: Finish Line - $5,000, Regular Grandstand - $3,500, Bleachers - $500. 

Chairman Wilks would like to remind fans “this Gibson McCook Relays is where athletes from all ages compete.”

 

Elaine Thompson-Herah began her 2023 campaign with a victory over 60m at the Queen's/Grace Jackson Invitational at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

Jamaican World 200m champion Shericka Jackson says she feels no pressure to replicate her exploits from her phenomenal 2022 season, insisting that once she is healthy, the times and performances will come naturally.

Jackson’s comments came after opening her 2023 outdoor season with a 53.11 effort to win the 400m ahead of GC Foster College’s Odeisha Nation (55.37) and Christine Cheka (55.78) at the Queen's/Grace Jackson meet at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

“For me there’s no pressure. I believe my coach and I did a very good job last year and all we have to do now is stay focused, not on other people’s expectations but his and my expectations. Once I’m healthy, I will definitely go super-fast,” Jackson said.

Jackson is coming off a phenomenal 2022 season. At the World Championships in Eugene, Oregon, she sped to a personal best of 21.45 to win gold in the 200m, becoming the fastest woman alive in the process.

In addition to her 200m crown, Jackson ran a personal best 10.73 to secure second in the 100m behind teammate Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce.

Prior to last season, Jackson said that one of her goals was to run 10.6 in the 100m, and, according to her, that has not changed.

“Last year I wanted to run 10.6 and I didn’t do that. To finish last year as the sixth-fastest ever and not run 10.6 is a great feeling. I think I have a lot more in the tank for the 100m so I just have to focus on execution and fast times will come,” she said.

Last season, Jackson also made waves on the indoor circuit, finishing sixth at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade in a personal best 7.04.

On February 4, she will compete in the event at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix in Boston.

“Last year the 60m helped me improve my start. I ran 7.04 and this year I’m hoping I can go faster,” she said.

The field will be a loaded one, including 400m hurdles World and Olympic Champion and world record holder Sydney McLaughlin-Levrone, World Indoor 60m silver medalist Mikiah Briscoe and World Championship 100m finalist Aleia Hobbs.

“It’s a good field competing so my focus is executing a good 60m,” Jackson said.

 

 

 

Jamaica's Reggae Girlz lost 2-1 to Paraguay at the Kingston’s National Stadium on Sunday in what was the second of two international friendlies. The Reggae Girlz won the first encounter against their South American opponents in Montego Bay on Thursday, November 10.

First-half goals from Celsa Sandaoval and Ramona Martinez in the 16th and 35th minutes, respectively gave the visitors a 2-0 lead at half-time before Khadijah ‘Bunny’ Shaw pulled one back from the penalty spot in the 61st minute.

Glaring errors by the Jamaica’s gifted the Paraguayans their two goals against a wasteful Jamaican team that missed several opportunities to score.

Deneisha Blackwood’s errant back pass was seized upon by Sandaoval, who beat an advancing Rebecca Spencer in the Jamaican goal before shooting into the bottom right hand corner.

The second 19 minutes later resulted in a poor pass from Havana Solaun, which gave the Paraguayan forwards to spread the ball wide before a cross found Martinez free inside the box to smash home from close range.

Head Coach Lorne Donaldson said he was not surprised by the slow start. He said he saw it coming given that the girls were not sharp during their warm-ups and it showed in the opening 20 minutes of the game.

He explained, however, that the match was not all about trying to win as there were several players that the coaching staff wanted to take a look at before finalizing the squad for the World Cup still nine months away.

“Our camp is a little bit different from Paraguay. We are still looking at stuff. We are still looking at players, so obviously we want to win but it is not going to be at all cost for this camp because we have to give some players a look, so stuff is going to be a little bit off and that was evident in the first 20 minutes,” he said.

Among the things that we “off” was the Reggae Girlz shooting. Chances fell to Drew Spence and Shaw in the first half but were either blocked missed entirely.

Spence’s 13th minute shot was parried by goalkeeper Christine Ricalde while Shaw dragged one past the far post just two minutes later.

Siobhan Wilson’s cross fell to Paige Bailey-Paige, whose shot from inside the box was charged down by a defender. Allyson Swaby also had a shot from two yards blocked by Ricalde.

Three changes made at the resumption of play resulted in Jamaica being more organized and stable defensively. Vyan Sampson replaced an ineffective Solaun and Atlanta Primus came on to replace Kayla McCoy in midfield while fullback Tiernney Wiltshire replaced Malikae Dayes.

Bailey-Gayle and Wilson were substituted for wingers Cheyna Matthews and Rachel Jones in the 59th minute, the latter making an immediate impact.

Jones’ driving run down the left flank and resulting cross led to the handled ball from which a penalty was awarded allowing Jamaica back into the game.

The changes, Donaldson said, were a direct result of the team’s inability to control the game and limit the number of turnovers, which invariably but the defence under pressure.

“If you see, when we came out in the second half there were two changes in the midfield because we couldn’t control the game, we couldn’t anything. We were passing the ball to the next team, so that’s a part of saying this would never work or this is not going to work,” he said while lamenting the poor finishing that ultimately cost the team.

“Should we have knocked some goals in, maybe we should have but such is football. To us, it’s preparation and the end product is what we are looking at.”

Donaldson said this was the last window when the coaching staff would be looking at new players. He indicated that by the next camp they should have the 30 players from which the final squad will be selected for the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

Shericka Jackson ran the third-fastest time in history to cap an outstanding campaign at Jamaica’s National Senior Athletics Championships on Sunday.

Jevaughn Powell and Candice McLeod were crowned 400m champions on Sunday’s last day of the 2022 Jamaican National Athletics Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Running in rainy conditions, Powell, a finalist at the NCAA Championships earlier in June, produced a late burst in the final 50 metres of the race to produce 45.50 to win ahead of Nathon Allen (45.64) and Anthony Cox (45.65).

McLeod, a finalist at the Tokyo Olympics last year, produced a strong season’s best of 50.29 to win ahead of Stephenie Ann McPherson (50.49) and Charokee Young (50.76).

There was an upset in the Women’s 800m as eight-time national champion Natoya Goule ran 2:00.83 for second behind Chrisann Gordon-Powell (2:00.35). Adelle Tracey ran 2:01.18 for third.

National record holder and NCAA Championships silver medallist Navasky Anderson ran 1:48.53 to win his first national title ahead of Kimar Farquharson (1:49.36) and Tarees Rhoden (1:49.89).

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Elaine Thompson-Herah and Shericka Jackson all safely advanced to Sunday’s Women’s 200m final as action continued on day three of the 2022 Jamaican National Senior Athletics Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

The three 100m medalists from the 2020 Tokyo Olympics all looked extremely easy to win their semi-finals in 22.54, 22.68 and 22.85, respectively.

Jackson, who secured the 100m title on Friday, looked especially easy, completely shutting down in the last 100m of the race.

Natalliah Whyte (23.05), Ashanti Moore (23.21), Kevona Davis (23.33), Jodean Williams (23.21) and Dominique Clarke (23.29) will join them in the final.

Meanwhile, 100m Champion Yohan Blake led all qualifiers to the Men’s final with a season’s best 20.20 to win his semi-final ahead of Andrew Hudson (20.23).

2020 Olympic finalist Rasheed Dwyer will also contest Sunday’s final after producing 20.35 to win his semi-final ahead of Nigel Ellis (20.45).

Mario Heslop (20.52), Riquan Graham (20.66), Jazeel Murphy (20.67) and Antonio Watson (20.74) complete the line-up for the final.

NCAA Championships silver medalist Charokee Young (50.19), 2020 Olympic finalist Candice McLeod (50.85), Stacey-Ann Williams (50.87) and 2013 World Championship bronze medalist Stephenie Ann McPherson (50.67) led all qualifiers to the Women’s 400m final.

The men were led by Jevaughn Powell (45.38), Anthony Cox (45.43), Nathon Allen (45.52) and Akeem Bloomfield (45.59).

The qualifiers for the Women’s sprint hurdles final were led by Britany Anderson (12.45), Megan Tapper (12.61), 2015 World Champion Danielle Williams (12.59) and Demisha Roswell (12.84).

Reigning Olympic Champion Hansle Parchment (13.24), Orlando Bennett (13.27), Rasheed Broadbell (13.29) and 2016 Olympic and 2017 World Champion Omar McLeod (13.36) led the qualifiers to the Men’s 110m hurdles final.

In the field, 2019 World Championship silver medalist Danniel Thomas-Dodd threw 18.79m to win her seventh national title ahead of Lloydricia Cameron (16.96m) and Danielle Sloley (15.98m).

Wayne Pinnock added to his NCAA Indoor and Outdoor titles earlier this season with a personal best 8.14m to win the Men’s long jump ahead of defending World Champion Tajay Gayle (7.97m) and Shawn-D Thompson (7.88m).

 

 

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