Sarina Wiegman believes England's 2-1 win over France on Tuesday was the boost they needed to keep their Euro 2025 qualification hopes alive.

The Lionesses lost 2-1 to the same opponents at St. James' Park on Friday, with the manager left rueing lapses in concentration over the set-pieces that led to France’s goals.

In the reverse fixture in Saint-Etienne, England dominated the first half, as goals from Georgia Stanway and Alessia Russo put them in control.

Leah Williamson conceded a penalty, which was coolly converted by Kadidiatou Diani in the second half, but England held on to see out a vital win and move just two points behind Les Bleues in Group A3.

Wiegman praised her side's response to Friday's defeat but remained coy about their chances ahead of their next qualifiers in July.

"A team effort," Wiegman told ITV Sport. "You know the second half is going to be different, and they are going to push, but we worked so hard to stay together and keep the win.

"You know they are going to press. They were really chasing us. We have to make better decisions, be a bit calmer. We played into their hands a bit. We know when they win the ball there, they have players that are so quick. We want to take those moments out, of course.

"Of course [the win] gives a boost. We want to win, and we are in a better position now. The group is totally open. We said from the beginning this is a really tough group with top level teams. It helps when you win, but most of all, we did better than Friday."

Russo was one of the standout players for England during the victory, and she echoed Wiegman's sentiments.

"I think we got our standards back to where we wanted them," Russo said. "There are still parts we will work on for sure. We know the level is higher than ever and to even qualify for the Euros is going to be harder than ever.

"I just tried to do what I could. France are a top side with some of the best centre-backs in the world. It was nice to get on the scoresheet, but we created a lot of better chances tonight.

"We know our standards have to be higher. We probably let them slip a bit recently. We know the talent we have. We know the potential we have, and we saw a lot more flashes of it tonight."

England Women's goalkeeper Mary Earps will miss the decisive clash with France Women on Tuesday after withdrawing from Sarina Wiegman's squad with a hip injury.

Earps left St. James' Park with crutches after sustaining an injury just eight minutes into Friday's 2-1 defeat against France.

That marred what should have been a memorable occasion for Manchester United goalkeeper Earps, who made her 50th appearance for the Lionesses.

England confirmed Earps will be unavailable for Tuesday's Euro 2025 qualifier away to France, with Birmingham City's Lucy Thomas joining Wiegman's 23-player squad for the trip to Saint-Etienne.

"Not the way the big 50 was meant to go, but grateful and hugely proud to have reached 50 caps for England," Earps posted to Instagram on Sunday. 

"Thank you for your lovely messages, gutted that I've picked up a minor hip injury which will sideline me for a couple of weeks.

"Not something I'm used to but nothing a little bit of rest and relaxation won't fix – right behind the girls for Tuesday!"

England are third in Group A3 as Wiegman's side chase qualification for next year's European Championship in Switzerland.

The Lionesses have four points and are behind second-placed Sweden on goal difference, with France five clear at the top of the group after three games.

Wiegman's team then host Ireland on July 12 and play Sweden away four days later in their final group game.

Sarina Wiegman rued England's sloppyness from set-pieces, as the Lionesses' Euro 2025 qualifying hopes were dented by a 2-1 defeat to France.

England suffered their first home defeat in a qualifying match since October 2002 with Les Bleues - ironically the last nation to inflict such a loss - coming from behind to prevail at St James' Park.

The reigning European champions had the opportunity to leapfrog France to the Group A3 summit and, despite losing goalkeeper Mary Earps to injury early on, the hosts appeared on course to do just that when Beth Mead opened the scoring after half an hour.

However, they were undone by set-pieces in both halves, as goals from Elisa De Almeida and Marie-Antoinette Katoto completed the turnaround in the visitors' favour.

The Lionesses, who travel to Stade Geoffroy-Guichard for the return meeting on Tuesday, slip to third place in Group A3. And though Wiegman hailed the overall performance, she acknowledged her side must improve.

"It was frustrating," she told ITV Sport. "I think we played pretty well, we conceded two goals from set plays, which we have to do a lot better on.

"In these matches, you don't get too many chances. In the first half, we created multiple, but only scored one - and they unfortunately scored one too.

"We were more on the ball in the second half without creating too many more chances, but we were dangerous. The final pass needed to be better.

"We know France are really good at set-pieces. Of course, we were prepared, but they still got that time."

Skipper Leah Williamson added: "[We're] really disappointed, the game was there to be won. It was a fantastic occasion. The fans have never let us down, so it's a shame not to give them a win as well.

"We played well, not good enough to win the game, but the chances were there to win it. Two set-pieces have killed us. There's an element of luck to those things, but first contact and second contact need to be better. We will be better on Tuesday."

Beth Mead admits England’s Euro qualifying group is “not the nicest” but hopes they can achieve “consistency” in their upcoming fixtures.

The Lionesses begin their European Championship title defence with qualifying games for next year’s tournament, starting with Sweden at Wembley on April 5 before facing the Republic of Ireland in Dublin four days later. Group A3 also includes France, who England will play in May.

April’s fixtures will be the first set of competitive games since their Nations League disappointment in December, where England’s hopes of securing a spot for Team GB in the Paris Olympics were ended and Mead believes they are in a “tough group” for the upcoming qualifiers.

Speaking about her reaction to the draw, the England forward told PA news agency: “We came in from training, saw the draw- it’s not the nicest group in the world!

“I think me and (Arsenal team-mate) Katie McCabe had a little joke about having to play against each other and winding each other up with her playing for Republic of Ireland.

“There’s no easy game in women’s football these days and I think we’ve ultimately got a very tough group and we’re going to have to be on top of our game to do very well in this group.

“I think the biggest thing for us as an England squad is consistency, we let ourselves down in some Nations League games and now we’ve just got to be consistent in the way we play, the way we’re building.

“Hopefully we can get two wins on the board this international break which puts us in really good stead for the rest of the games in the group.”

Mead is an ambassador for McDonald’s Fun Football and was celebrating the return of sessions, which will see 500,000 children across the UK provided with free football coaching this spring.

She is in action on Sunday as Arsenal hunt for silverware in the Continental Tyres League Cup Final against Chelsea at Molineux, but after the international break only five Women’s Super League games remain.

The title race is out of Arsenal’s control with the team sat six points away from joint-leaders Chelsea and Manchester City, and Mead admits the Champions League is the target now.

“I think looking forward to the rest of the season as a team we’ve got to, as cliche as it sounds, game by game, three points on the board,” Mead added.

“Our ultimate goal now is to get Champions League football and you never know what happens in football, but it’s out of our hands title-wise now and we’re very aware of that.

“Throughout the season itself I think consistency has been our biggest problem, we’ve been a little bit up and down with some games, lost some games that arguably we probably shouldn’t have.

“That’s something we need to rectify going to the end of the season, then we reset and start again fresh next year.”

Mead also has an eye on former club Sunderland, who are top of a tightly-contested Women’s Championship with three games to go.

Four other teams remain in the running to secure promotion to the WSL and Mead, who joined Arsenal from the Black Cats in 2017, highlighted the importance of keeping all the women’s leagues competitive.

“I’ve been to a few games in the Championship this season, I obviously follow Sunderland still and they’re top at the moment so hopefully they can keep themselves there,” she said.

“It’s amazing to see how much talent is coming through and the backing these clubs in the lower leagues are getting from the men’s side of things.

“That’s what we want to keep doing, we want to keep every league as competitive as possible and make England still one of the best leagues in the world.”

Beth Mead was celebrating the launch of this year’s McDonald’s Fun Football programme, available to all children aged 5-11 across the UK. Sign up now for your nearest FREE session at mcdonalds.co.uk/football.

Clara Mateo believes France can put their pre-World Cup difficulties behind them as they look to unite under new head coach Herve Renard.

Les Bleues were embroiled in a pre-tournament saga involving a group of leading players and former coach Corinne Diacre, who oversaw their run to the semi-finals of Euro 2022.

A revolt from several players – including captain Wendie Renard and Eugenie Le Sommer – ultimately led to Diacre's dismissal, with two-time Africa Cup of Nations winner Herve Renard installed in her place.

With the drama over, Mateo is hopeful the squad can put their troubles behind them in Australia and New Zealand, where they face Jamaica, Brazil and Panama in the group stage.

"I think there's a very good understanding between the players and the staff," she told Stats Perform. "We're all doing our bit, and we're all keen to represent France well at this World Cup.

"As far as we're concerned, we're concentrating on ourselves. We know what we have to do, and we'll give it our all on the pitch.

 

"[Herve Renard] puts a lot of emphasis on the mental aspect and the cohesion within the group. He brings all his experience from all the competitions he's played in before.

"You want to listen to everything he has to say. We want to fight for him. They [the staff] have lots of things to teach us and we're very receptive. We're working to be ready for D-Day."

Mateo described her inclusion in the squad as the fulfilment of a dream, adding that France have learned from their semi-final loss to Germany at last year's European Championships.

"Now that it's become a goal, I think it's a great achievement," she said on making the squad. 

"[But] there's still a long way to go. We want to do well at this World Cup. We're going there with ambitions.

"We've set ourselves the target of reaching the semi-finals, because that's something we haven't done in the past. We want to reach the semi-finals.

"Obviously, in the back of our minds, what we want is to win this World Cup. So we're going to the World Cup with a lot of ambition, and we know that we have this objective."

Herve Renard's arrival as France coach has made Les Bleues think they are "the best in the world" and fostered belief in their chances of winning the Women's World Cup, says Selma Bacha.

Renard, who oversaw Saudi Arabia's incredible win over eventual champions Argentina at the men's World Cup last year, took the reins in March following the dismissal of Corinne Diacre.

The French Football Federation removed Diacre from the role after a group of players – including captain Wendie Renard – refused to represent the team if she remained in charge.

With France gearing up to face Jamaica in their Group F opener in Sydney on July 23, Lyon star Bacha has been impressed by Renard's impact, telling Stats Perform: "He put us in a good mood. 

"He made us realise that we were the best in the world, that we had great, great potential and that he was coming in with a game plan.

"Everyone understands this game plan, so when everyone understands, we're all in the same boat. 

"Frankly, I'm ready to die for this coach, this staff, and I hope that my soldiers – in other words, my team-mates – are ready."

France suffered a semi-final exit against Germany at least year's European Championships in England, but Bacha is confident they can improve on that showing in Australia and New Zealand.

Asked if she believed France could win the tournament, Bacha said: "Frankly, yes, I do. Once again, it's all very well to talk, but now we have to act. 

"It's all very well to say, 'we believe in it', but now we have to act. Right now, the group is top notch, we're living well and we know that we want this title that France so desperately needs."

Having represented France since 2021, Bacha is relishing the prospect of making her first World Cup appearance later this month.

"It's a dream, a childhood dream," she said. "I never thought I'd experience this kind of moment. I'd been to the Euros, but a World Cup is still a World Cup.

"I'm very proud because I know I've worked hard to get here and I still have room for improvement, as the coach says. But in any case, it's a dream come true.

"I'm really happy because I never thought things would progress so quickly, and then, I'm someone who listens a lot. When someone comes to give me advice, I listen carefully. I'm very proud of that. 

"I know that I still have room for improvement and I have very high goals, but I know I'll get there. For the moment, I'm very happy with the start of my career."

Ellen White will be sad to see several talented Spain players miss the Women's World Cup over a dispute with the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) and head coach Jorge Vilda. 

Last September, 15 Spain players pledged to resign from the national team unless Vilda was dismissed, claiming his tenure was having a negative impact on their "emotional state".

The RFEF stood by Vilda, who has coached La Roja since 2015 but has failed to take the side beyond the last eight of three major tournaments, and just three of the players involved in the dispute have made the trip to Australia and New Zealand.

Barcelona duo Mariona Caldentey and Aitana Bonmati – as well as Manchester United's Ona Batlle – have been recalled by Vilda, but 12 others remain frozen out.

Speaking at the launch of Pixel FC, a collective of dedicated women's football creators helping to close the visibility gap within women's football, White lamented their absence and said players' conditions need to be discussed.

"I think it's important to have those conversations," England's record goalscorer said. "I can't say what side [I would be on] because I'm not 100 per cent sure on everything, but I think it's really important.

"To be honest, it's really sad that we haven't got some of the best players in the world playing for their nation because of a number of different reasons. 

"I think that's really sad. In the World Cup, you should see the best players on show, so I feel really disappointed and sad for them. 

"I'm hoping that as time goes on and the conversations are had, those grievances are heard and they are able to continue to play for their country in the manner in which they want to."

France were also impacted by a player revolt earlier this year, with the withdrawal of captain Wendie Renard influential in Les Bleues' decision to part company with coach Corrine Diacre.

Former Saudi Arabia boss Herve Renard has since taken over and recalled the Lyon defender, and White hopes that move has had the desired effect on France's squad.

"Well, obviously, they've now brought in the new manager, so I'm hoping that's galvanised the squad and brought more excitement," she said. 

"These conversations need to happen for change to happen, and I'm hoping that they keep pushing for the change that they want.

"But the new manager has come in, and the players that originally said they wouldn't join the squad have now rejoined the squad, so I'm hoping it's moving in the right direction.

"I can't speak for the players, but I'm hoping that they feel comfortable enough to play for their nation and the conversations are really important to have."

England's Euro 2022-winning defender Demi Stokes respects players from France, Spain and Nigeria for taking a stance on conditions in women's football ahead of the World Cup.

The preparations of several teams for the tournament in Australia and New Zealand – which begins on July 20 – have been impacted by disputes between players and coaches or federations.

Earlier this year, France dismissed head coach Corinne Diacre after a group of players – including captain Wendie Renard – refused to represent Les Bleues under her.

The Lyon skipper has since been recalled by Diacre's successor, two-time Africa Cup of Nations winner Herve Renard. 

Meanwhile, 15 players told the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) they would no longer play under Roja boss Jorge Vilda last September, citing impacts on their "emotional state", though the RFEF has stood by the embattled coach. 

Manchester City left-back Stokes – who was an unused member of the Lionesses squad that won last year's Euros before being overlooked for the World Cup – believes the players involved have their teams' interests at heart.

"Obviously, Wendie Renard has her reasons for why she doesn't want to play for France," she said, speaking at the launch of Pixel FC, a collective of dedicated women’s football creators helping to close the visibility gap within women’s football.

"Without people like Wendie taking a stance – if you look at the Spanish team as well – there's not going to be changes.

"All they're asking for is change [in response] to the challenges, and they are just being authentic to themselves.

"If they said they are not playing for France and then go and play for France, people won't take them seriously. So, I respect what they've done.

"Hopefully things can change, things can be resolved and things can be put into practice to help these players, protect these players and support them. 

"When players take a stance, I think it just shows the characters that they are."

Only three of the Spain rebels – Mariona Caldentey, Aitana Bonmati and Ona Batlle – have been recalled, with Stokes' City team-mates Leila Ouahabi and Laia Aleixandri among those frozen out.

Asked who she was backing in the Spain dispute, Stokes said: "I don't know, I think it's very different when you're in that situation. 

"I've got team-mates who have taken that stance and stuck by it, and then equally you've got players who want to play, and I think everyone's very different. 

"I can't be the one to judge and say, 'you're wrong or right'. It wouldn't be easy for me to just say I'd do that, because in the moment, it can be very different."

Nigeria have also seen their World Cup preparations hampered by an internal quarrel, with players threatening to boycott games if the Nigerian Football Federation reneges on an agreement to split revenue from the tournament.

Asked if she thought the Nigeria squad would follow through on that threat, Stokes said: "I'm not sure. 

"Hopefully they can resolve their issues, and it's probably never nice to boycott, but if they take that stance then they're doing it for a valid reason and they're doing it for a bigger picture and a bigger cause."

Wendie Renard and Eugenie Le Sommer were recalled to the France squad on Friday as new coach Herve Renard began his Women's World Cup planning.

Long-serving captain and centre-back Renard indicated in February she would not play on for France under the Corinne Diacre regime, and forwards Kadidiatou Diani and Marie-Antoinette Katoto followed suit.

That public boycott by the trio triggered the end of Diacre's five-and-a-half-year spell in charge.

Diani and Katoto are unavailable for selection due to injury at present, but the change of leadership has led to an immediate recall for Wendie Renard, although it has yet to be decided whether the 32-year-old will skipper the team.

Coach Renard – not related to defender Renard – said the pair would talk about that issue, and he would also consider the squad's feelings when they meet for friendlies against Colombia on April 7 and against Canada on April 11.

Talks have taken place with Katoto already, with boss Renard assuring the striker she is a big part of his future plans, while he has also delivered a positive message to Amandine Henry, the experienced Lyon midfielder who dropped off the international group during Diacre's reign.

Forward Le Sommer, who has won 175 caps but last featured in April 2021, had also been cut out of Diacre's plans.

She missed the Euro 2022 finals, but ahead of her 34th birthday in May the Lyon forward finds herself back in favour with Les Bleues and has a chance to majorly revive her international career.

"She has incomparable experience," said coach Renard. "We really need her experience and her intelligence in the game. It was a pleasure to chat with her and I can't wait to meet her and see her at work."

Looking at the wider picture, Renard indicated he had been given carte blanche regarding squad selection.

The French Football Federation previously criticised the manner of the players' boycott, affirming that acting in such a way "to express their criticisms was no longer acceptable in future".

For the greater good, however, misgivings have been set aside, with coach Renard saying: "It was very clear to me. The FFF gave me a very extensive list of pre-selected players with all the players.

"I felt the FFF gave me the green light to select all the players from this list. For me, what happened [in the past], it does not concern me," the coach said. "We can pay tribute to Corinne Diacre who obtained good results. But now the page turns."

The appointment of Renard as Diacre's successor came on Thursday, after he resigned as coach of the Saudi Arabia men's team.

He oversaw the team's stunning 2-1 victory over eventual winners Argentina at last year's World Cup in Qatar, and now another World Cup awaits, with Australia and New Zealand co-hosting the women's tournament in July and August.

His contract with Les Bleues will run until August 2024, meaning he is also set to be in charge of France at next year's home Olympic Games in Paris.

Herve Renard has been confirmed as the new head coach of France's women's team after a player revolt led to the dismissal of Corinne Diacre.

Renard resigned from his role as Saudi Arabia boss earlier this week, having overseen the team's memorable 2-1 victory over eventual winners Argentina at last year's World Cup in Qatar.

The French Football Federation (FFF) sacked Diacre earlier in March after several big-name Bleues players refused to play under her, criticising her management style and treatment of the squad.

Renard was immediately touted as a potential replacement for Diacre, and the 54-year-old's appointment was finalised on Thursday.

His contract with Les Bleues will run until August 2024, allowing him to lead the team at the upcoming World Cup in Australia and New Zealand, as well as next year's home Olympic Games in Paris.

In addition to leading Zambia and Ivory Coast to Africa Cup of Nations titles in 2012 and 2015 respectively, Renard has also taken charge of Angola and Morocco during a long career in international football.

A statement from the FFF said Renard will be officially presented at a press conference on Friday, when he will also name his squad for next month's friendlies against Colombia and Canada.

France will begin their World Cup campaign against Jamaica in Sydney on July 23, before facing Brazil and Panama in their subsequent Group F matches.

Saudi Arabia have announced the resignation of head coach Herve Renard, who is set to be confirmed as the head coach of France's women's team.

Renard, who had a contract as Saudi Arabia coach until 2027, will take charge of the French side ahead of the Women's World Cup in Australia and New Zealand later this year.

The 54-year-old, who has won the Africa Cup of Nations twice as a coach, will replace Corinne Diacre as Les Bleues coach.

Diacre left her role amid a player exodus over her management style and treatment of the squad.

In a statement on social media, the Saudi national team said: "The Saudi Arabian Football Federation Board of Directors has agreed on the contract termination of the Head Coach of the Saudi National Team Mr Herve Renard upon his request.

"A legal settlement has been reached to end the contract between the two parties.

"The President and Board of Directors of SAFF wish for Mr Renard every success in his future career."

Renard took the post in 2019 and guided Saudi Arabia to their second successive World Cup finals, becoming the foreign-born manager with the most wins in the nation's history.

He led Saudi Arabia to a shock 2-1 win over eventual champions Argentina in their first group game in Qatar, but defeats to Poland and Mexico meant they failed to reach the knock-out rounds.

Renard oversaw a 2-1 friendly defeat to Bolivia on Tuesday and later posted on social media: "Having been the coach of the national team of Saudi Arabia is a great pride for me. 

"Since August 2019, I had the chance to be an integral part of the life of this beautiful country. I have seen this team grow alongside me and achieve a fabulous World Cup and this fantastic and unforgettable win against Argentina.

"Very proud to have been able to show to the world the progress and a good image of Saudi football. It's time for me to fly to another horizon but with these memories engraved in me."

Didier Deschamps has expressed concern about how the coach of the France women's team was ousted from power after a player revolt.

Three players, led by captain Wendie Renard, went public by stating they would not play on for Les Bleus under the then-existing regime.

The French Football Federation (FFF) elected to sack Diacre on March 9 after acknowledging her relationship with players had "reached a point of no return which harms the interests of the national team".

It was a decision that ended a sometimes controversial reign, with the move coming ahead of France competing at this year's Women's World Cup, which takes place in July and August in Australia and New Zealand.

Deschamps has never faced such a situation, but he appears to have reservations about how the saga played out.

"I'm laughing, but I don't want to laugh about it," he said in a France men's team press conference on Thursday. "I have to weigh every word. I don't have the ins and outs.

"After the decision… I don't know if it was a good one or a less bad one or whatever.

"There is the substance and the form. As a coach, trainer, the form [of how it happened] bothers me. I will not say more, but you will have understood me."

Thierry Henry has turned down the chance to become the next coach of France following Corinne Diacre's dismissal, FFF committee member Jean-Michel Aulas confirmed.

The former striker, widely considered one of the country's all-time greatest players, has been out of a coaching job since the end of the Qatar 2022 World Cup, where he was an assistant with Belgium.

Following Diacre's exit amid a player boycott for the women's team however, the FFF are seeking to find a successor ahead of the Women's World Cup in Australia and New Zealand later this year.

It will not be Henry however, with the former Montreal Impact boss declining the chance to take the reins heading into the tournament.

"He considered it, Thierry," Aulas told Le Figaro. "I personally asked him the question, but the response was not positive.

"He was obviously very flattered that he was asked. We did it because we were told he might be interested.

"But it will not be Thierry Henry. I think he is moving on to other projects."

France's World Cup preparations were dealt a major blow when former captain Wendie Renard announced she would sit out the tournament, along with several other key players, in protest against Diacre.

Though the FFF initially stood by their coach, they elected to sack the former Clermont boss after acknowledging her relationship with players had "reached a point of no return which harms the interests of the national team".

France open their campaign against Jamaica on July 23 before further games against Brazil and Panama.

France captain Wendie Renard is willing to return to international football after participating in a player revolt which led to the sacking of head coach Corinne Diacre.

Last month, Lyon defender Renard announced she would not play at this year's World Cup under Diacre's leadership, a stance which was replicated by forwards Kadidiatou Diani and Marie-Antoinette Katoto.

Diacre subsequently accused her detractors of participating in "a destabilisation operation", but the French Football Federation (FFF) removed her from her post following a meeting of its executive committee.

The FFF said a "fracture" between Diacre and senior players had "reached a point of no return which harms the interests of the national team".

In the aftermath of that decision, Renard – who has won 142 international caps and played at three World Cups – is open to a return, if any future head coach wishes to recall her.

"It's the coach who will select me if I perform well with my club... but why not?" she told radio station Europe 1.

"I am a competitor at heart. I love this jersey and I want to do everything to win a title with it."

Despite taking the decision to sack Diacre, the FFF criticised the manner of the players' boycott, affirming that acting in such a way "to express their criticisms was no longer acceptable in future".

Corinne Diacre was sacked as France head coach on Thursday after a player revolt highlighted "irreversible dysfunctions" ahead of the Women's World Cup.

The French Football Federation (FFF) said its executive committee determined a "fracture" between Diacre and senior players had "reached a point of no return which harms the interests of the national team".

It follows captain Wendie Renard last month announcing she would not play at the World Cup under Diacre's leadership, with forwards Kadidiatou Diani and Marie-Antoinette Katoto following suit by putting their own international careers on hold. All three issued forceful statements on social media before effectively going on strike from the team.

Diacre came out fighting on Wednesday when she accused her detractors of participating in "a destabilisation operation ... whose only objective is a personal settling of scores".

Yet her five-and-a-half-year stint at the national team helm is over, following recommendations made by a commission comprising former France women's players Laura Georges and Aline Riera, long-time Lyon president Jean-Michel Aulas and former France men's international Marc Keller.

The FFF said in a statement: "The numerous hearings carried out made it possible to establish the observation of a very significant divide with senior players and highlighted a discrepancy with the requirements of the very high level. This fracture has reached a point of no return which harms the interests of the national team.

"If the FFF recognises the involvement and the seriousness of Corinne Deacon and her staff in the exercise of their mission, it appears that the dysfunctions observed seem, in this context, irreversible.

"In view of these elements, it was decided to put an end to the mission of Corinne Deacon at the head of the French women's team.

"This change of coach is part of a new global ambition led by the FFF in favour of the development of women's football and the performance of the French team, which will have to achieve high objectives during the 2023 World Cup and the 2024 Olympics."

Interim FFF president Philippe Diallo called on the commission to begin the search for a new head coach and determine candidates as soon as possible.

As Diacre reluctantly departs, the FFF called into question the tactics of the players in staging their public mutiny, stating that operating in such a way "to express their criticisms was no longer acceptable in future".

France begin their campaign at the Women's World Cup, which will be co-hosted by Australia and New Zealand, when they play Jamaica in Sydney on July 23. They will also face Brazil and Panama in Group F.

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