Two-time Women's World Cup winner Carli Lloyd has announced she will retire from playing at the end of the year.

The 39-year-old has earned 312 caps for the United States and represented 11 clubs across a 22-year playing career, 12 of those as a professional.

Lloyd is one of four players to have played more than 300 times at international level and is in line to play her last match for USA in their September and October friendlies.

She will also see out the remainder of the National Women's Soccer League season with NJ/NY Gotham FC before ending her career.

The New Jersey native hinted at her retirement following USA's defeat to Canada in the Tokyo Olympics semi-finals earlier this month and confirmed her decision on Monday.

"When I first started out with the national team in 2005, my two main goals were to be the most complete soccer player I could be and to help the team win championships," she said in a statement.

"Every single day I stepped out onto the field, I played as if it was my last game. I never wanted to take anything for granted, especially knowing how hard it is to get to the top, but even harder to stay at the top for so long."

 

Lloyd played under five different coaches for the USA across three different decades and lifted the World Cup in 2015 and 2019, having finished as a runner-up in the 2011 edition.

Through her 312 caps, which also includes appearances at four Olympic Games, the USWNT have a record of 257 wins, 17 draws and 38 defeats for a win percentage of 88 per cent.

"I would like to thank U.S. Soccer for helping to provide the opportunities and memories that will last a lifetime," Lloyd added. "I am forever grateful to have represented the crest and to be able to play for my country for the last 17 years.

"I will continue to support and cheer this team on and continue to find ways to help grow the game and inspire the next generation."

Lloyd is one of two Americans to win the FIFA Women's Player of the Year award on multiple occasions, doing so in 2015 and 2016. Mia Hamm was the other player to do so in 2001 and 2002.

Megan Rapinoe scored direct from a corner as she and fellow United States veteran Carli Lloyd hit doubles to sink Australia 4-3 in the Olympic Games bronze medal game.

Australia's replies came from Sam Kerr, Caitlin Foord and Emily Gielnik in the seven-goal feast at Ibaraki Kashima Stadium.

It was 36-year-old Rapinoe and 39-year-old Lloyd who stole the show, though, on what may prove to be farewell appearances for the superstar duo.

Whether they play on in the short term for the national team remains to be seen, but this was likely a final outing at the Olympics for both, and they went out in style.

Rapinoe opened the scoring in the eighth minute when her wicked in-swinging corner from the left evaded everybody and found the net.

Kerr levelled seven minutes later with her 48th goal for Australia – a new national team record – when her shot proved too powerful for Adrianna Franch, but it was soon Rapinoe's time again.

The standout player from the 2019 World Cup smashed in her second goal of this game on the volley, connecting sweetly from around 12 yards after Alanna Kennedy sliced an attempted clearance.

Lloyd, who became the outright second most-capped player in US history by making her 312th appearance, got in on the goals just before half time. Her thumping left-footed shot across goal found the right corner, putting the US 3-1 up.

Lloyd scored again in the 51st minute after another Kennedy error, this time a weak header back to her goalkeeper allowing Lloyd a clear run on goal, with the striker slotting home.

That made her the US team's all-time highest scorer in Olympic women's football with 10 goals. Lloyd won Olympic gold in 2008 and 2012, with Rapinoe also on the triumphant latter team in London.

Australia got back into this game with a header from Foord after 54 minutes, and Kerr headed against the left post two minutes later. Substitute Gielnik rattled in a delicious late third for Australia, but they could not find a fourth.

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