Test skipper Joe Root powered England to a crushing World Cup victory over West Indies to soothe the pain of stricken one-day captain Eoin Morgan. 

West Indies all-rounder Andre Russell became the third player forced to leave the field due to injury during Friday's Cricket World Cup game against England at the Rose Bowl. 

Putting extra effort into a short-pitched delivery that struck Jonny Bairstow on the helmet, the paceman fell in his follow through and had to be helped off the field.

So often a dynamite player for the Windies, Russell also needed treatment whilst batting after striking consecutive sixes, with additional support being given to his wrist.

Russell has been troubled by a knee problem, hobbling off in his side's crushing win over Pakistan.

England suffered their own injury problems during the West Indies innings of 212 all out - Jason Roy sidelined after feeling tightness in his left hamstring before captain Eoin Morgan's back spasms meant Jos Buttler had to step into the breach as captain.

Test skipper Joe Root moved up the order in England's run chase, with Roy unable to open.

Jason Roy was forced to leave the field during England's Cricket World Cup clash against West Indies as he suffered what appeared to be a hamstring injury at the Rose Bowl.

The opener, who came into the match in fine form after hitting 153 against Bangladesh in England's last outing, was in immediate discomfort chasing a single in the outfield, which left captain Eoin Morgan expressing concern for the 28-year-old.

James Vince - the only back-up batsman in England's squad - took Roy's place in the field.

If the injury keeps Roy on the sidelines, Vince would be the prime candidate to take his place at the top of the batting order alongside Jonny Bairstow in future matches. All-rounder Moeen Ali, left out for the second game running on Friday, is the other option should Roy be ruled out.

Mark Wood took his place in an unchanged England line-up after overcoming an injury concern ahead of their Cricket World Cup clash against West Indies, leaving Moeen Ali on the sidelines once again.

Wood had been doubtful for Friday's contest due to an ankle niggle, yet the Durham paceman was named in an unchanged line-up for the hosts, with Jos Buttler also fit to keep wicket following a hip injury.

Heavy rain throughout the week affected preparations at the Rose Bowl, but dry conditions were expected as Eoin Morgan elected to bowl first upon winning the toss, with all eyes on Jofra Archer as the Barbados-born paceman came up against West Indies for the first time.

The Windies made three changes to the side that briefly took the field against South Africa on Monday, with Evin Lewis, Shannon Gabriel and Andre Russell coming into their starting XI.

England were looking to maintain their impressive World Cup record against the West Indies. Since losing the 1979 final, they have won the following five matches between the pair and also count Hampshire as a happy hunting ground with four succesive victories under their belts.

Jofra Archer is set to take centre stage in the Cricket World Cup on Friday when England and West indies resume their rivalry. 

Barbados-born pace bowler Archer represented West Indies at Under-19 level, only to switch allegiances due to his British passport and residency.

The much-vaunted 24-year-old, who took 3-29 against Bangladesh on Saturday, only made his England debut in May but is already being viewed as a potentially key man in Eoin Morgan's squad.

His involvement looks certain to add further spice to what is already an intriguing duel, with West Indies having this year beaten England at Test level and drawn a five-match ODI series with them 2-2.

Wicket-keeper Jos Buttler has been declared "fully fit" but pace bowler Mark Wood (ankle) faces a late fitness test. Moeen Ali is back with the squad following the birth of his daughter this week. 

Both sides will hope for an improvement in the weather conditions after Thursday's clash between India and New Zealand became the third match abandoned in four days.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

England have won two of their opening three matches, defeating South Africa and Bangladesh. Their only loss to date came against Pakistan, whom West Indies beat in their World Cup opener. Things have not gone to plan since, however, with a defeat to Australia followed up by their match against South Africa being rained off. 

WHAT THEY SAID

England skipper Morgan: "[Archer] won't know how it will feel until he plays the game. I think being in that position myself [being born in the Republic of Ireland] it does feel different the first time you play against a side that either you could have potentially played for or played for. But I'm sure he will handle it like he's handled everything else so far."

West Indies captain Holder: "I have seen Jofra over the years. He is obviously a Barbadian. He's grown up in Barbados playing cricket so what I'm seeing of Jofra doesn't surprise me. He is one of those guys who has always had ability and talent. It is just unfortunate how things went in terms of his decision making, but he is a good talent."

OPTA FACTS

- England have won 11 of their last 13 completed ODIs against West Indies (L2), however the Windies' victories in that run came when they met earlier this year.

- Chris Gayle (1,596) needs 24 runs in this match to become the leading scorer in ODIs between England and West Indies, Viv Richards is currently top of the list with 1,619 runs. 

- England have won their last five Cricket World Cup matches against West Indies, this after losing their inaugural meeting in the tournament (1979 final). 

- Buttler's highest ODI score in his 111 innings came against West Indies earlier in 2019, hitting 150 runs from 77 balls – a match in which a record 46 sixes were hit (England 24, West Indies 22).

England fast bowler Mark Wood faces a late fitness test ahead of Friday's Cricket World Cup meeting against West Indies - but wicketkeeper Jos Buttler has been declared fully fit.

Wood has reported discomfort in his ankle following Saturday's win over Bangladesh and, given his history of injury problems in that department, could be rested.

Buttler, meanwhile, aggravated a hip problem while batting in the same game, but has received the all-clear to play.

"Jos is fully fit," skipper Eoin Morgan said. "Mark Wood is going to have a fitness test in the morning.

"It's nothing too serious. He pulled up a little bit sore from the game in Cardiff so he is the only concern at the moment.

"His ankle is a little bit sore, I think it [resting him] depends. We haven't bowled pretty much for two days, or he hasn't bowled, so he will have to see how he bowls and if it is still sore, we probably won't take a risk."

Moeen Ali is back with the squad following the birth of his baby daughter on Wednesday and he could replace Wood after being stood down for the previous match as the second spinner.

"[We'll see] whether we feel we might go with four [seamers], like we did in Cardiff, or two spinners might be more effective," Morgan added.

The West Indies will begin their bid to become World Test champions when they host India for five weeks starting in August.

India have announced Shikhar Dhawan will remain in England as their medical team continue to monitor the thumb injury he suffered in the win over Australia on Sunday.

Opening batsman Dhawan was struck on his left hand by a delivery from Pat Cummins in the early stages of the Cricket World Cup clash at The Oval, though the blow did not stop him continuing his innings.

The left-hander went on to make 117, helping India amass 352-5 after opting to bat first, but did not field in the second half of the fixture, watching on from the dressing room as Australia were bowled out for 316 in reply.

Reports in the media have suggested a suspected hairline fracture and while the team have yet to confirm the full extent of the damage, the Board of Control for Cricket in India did offer an update via Twitter on Tuesday.

"Team India opening batsman Mr Shikhar Dhawan is presently under the observation of the BCCI medical team," they wrote in a post that also included a picture of Dhawan celebrating reaching 50 against Australia.

"The team management has decided that Mr Dhawan will continue to be in England and his progress will be monitored."

India are next in action on Thursday, as they face New Zealand at Trent Bridge in a battle between two teams who still own 100 per cent records at this year's tournament.

Virat Kohli's side then take on Pakistan at Old Trafford on Sunday, though they may have to do without Dhawan for at least the next two games.

Bangladesh are "very optimistic" Shakib Al Hasan will overcome a thigh injury in time to face West Indies next Monday at the Cricket World Cup.

All-rounder Shakib strained his left thigh while batting during the clash with host nation England on Saturday, though he still went on to score a century in a losing cause in Cardiff.

The Tigers saw Tuesday's fixture against Sri Lanka washed out in Bristol but now have a break from action in the tournament, giving the 32-year-old time to undergo further treatment.

"He picked up a little injury, as you all saw in that game against England," Bangladesh coach Steve Rhodes told the media.

"He fought on, battled on and played extremely well with an injury.

"We're very, very optimistic that the treatment that he'll get this week and the way that he can recover well. We're very optimistic that he can play in that next game against West Indies."

Bangladesh's game with Sri Lanka was the second at this year's World Cup to be abandoned without any play whatsoever, while South Africa and West Indies managed just 7.3 overs in Southampton on Monday.

With teams picking up just a solitary point for rained-off fixtures, rain could have a crucial say in deciding who qualifies for the semi-finals.

Englishman Rhodes knows all about the unpredictable weather in his home country, leading him to suggest the World Cup may have benefited from building reserve days into the schedule for the group stage.

"If you know the English weather, sadly we're going to get a lot of rain," said Rhodes, who played 11 Tests and nine ODI games for England in his playing career.

"We never know when the rain is going to come. People from all over the world keep asking me whether it's going to rain; I don't know. But, at the moment, we're seeing some problems.

"And I know logistically it would have been a big headache for the tournament organisers, and I know that it would have been difficult, but we have got quite a lot of time in between games, and if we have got to travel a day later, then so be it.

"We put men on the moon, so why can we not have a reserve day, when actually this tournament is a long tournament? They are spread out, the games.

"I would say that it's disappointing for the crowd as well. They have got tickets to see a game of cricket and it would be up to them if they can get there the day after."

South Africa's slim hopes of reaching the Cricket World Cup semi-finals were dented further as their match with West Indies was washed out on Monday after only 45 deliveries at the Rose Bowl. 

While it may feel as if the Cricket World Cup is just starting to warm up, South Africa must fear they are already in danger of being left out in the cold in the battle to reach the knockout stages.

Monday's meeting with West Indies in Southampton appears to be make or break for Faf du Plessis' squad following three straight defeats. Lose another in the round-robin section and their hopes of progressing look bleak at best.

The Proteas were no match for hosts England in the tournament opener and while losing to India in their most recent outing was hardly a surprise, the setback against Bangladesh sandwiched in between those two games has left them still without a point to their name.

With six fixtures remaining, they know they must turn around their campaign - and fast.

However, West Indies are not a team you want to face when you're up against it. Batting was seen as their stronger suit coming into the event, yet their quick bowlers have been the ones to catch the eye in their two outings to date.

Utilising the short ball superbly, they roughed up Pakistan in a one-sided victory and then had Australia on the ropes at 38-4, only for Steve Smith and Nathan Coulter-Nile to engineer a recovery for the reigning world champions.

West Indies will feel they missed an opportunity against Australia, when they fell 15 runs short in their chase, but may relish the chance to land a potential knockout blow on a fragile South Africa team just desperate to stay alive.


TOURNAMENT SO FAR

Things have not gone to plan so far for the Proteas, who must decide whether to stick or twist when it comes to selection. The media focus on the absent AB de Villiers - who was ready to make a return to international duty, only to be overlooked by the selectors - has not helped.

South Africa failed to chase down totals in excess of 300 in their first two outings, yet batting first failed to result in a turnaround in their fortunes against India on Wednesday.

As for West Indies, they pummelled Pakistan and came up just short against Australia, with both of their games taking place at Trent Bridge.

It will be interesting to see if a similar tactic of short-pitched bowling works so effectively at a different venue, particularly one where India's spinners prospered against South Africa.


WHAT THEY SAID

"It's [India] a game that I really hoped that we would win. There was a lot on that game. It was going to give us some breathing space. So now we've just got a stiff challenge ahead of us, but we're ready to stand up, rise up to it." - South Africa quick Kagiso Rabada.

"We are obviously confident, but we have to respect South Africa as well. They are a good side. They have lost three games. We know they have got world-class players so we can't underestimate their ability and we have to go out and play hard and smart cricket and stick to our game plans." - West Indies assistant coach Roddy Estwick.


OPTA FACTS

- South Africa and West Indies have split the last four ODIs between the teams, though the latter won the most recent fixture, in June 2016, by 100 runs.

- The Proteas have claimed victory in four of their six matches against West Indies at the World Cup, including their previous three encounters.

- Shai Hope has reached 50 on 16 occasions in ODIs since the start of 2017, including a knock of 68 last time out against Australia.

Jason Roy flattened an umpire and bludgeoned Bangladesh as World Cup hosts England returned to winning ways in Cardiff. 

Jason Holder was frustrated to see West Indies let victory slip from their grasp as "irresponsible" batting allowed Australia to prevail by 15 runs.

Thursday's thrilling Cricket World Cup encounter at Trent Bridge started off in fine fashion for the Windies, who reduced their opponents to 38-4 before Steve Smith (73) and Nathan Coulter-Nile's swashbuckling 92 off 60 balls propelled Australia to 288 all out.

At 149-3 midway through the chase, Holder's men looked well set to make it two wins from two but Shimron Hetmyer's run out and some poor shot-making saw that honour go to Australia, for whom Mitchell Starc shone with 5-46.

"We're obviously disappointed. I thought we were well in the game there. Just a few irresponsible shots when we probably just needed to tap it around a little bit more," Holder, who made 51, said in the on-field presentation.

"We dropped Coulter-Nile when he was about 60-odd and he got about another 30 runs. That was one pivotal moment but obviously the batting... If we came here at the start of the day and limited Australia to 280, we'd have taken that.

"The batters need to take the responsibility and knock it off. We have to be more consistent. When we have teams down, we have to keep them down."

Coulter-Nile, meanwhile, reflected on making the highest score by a number eight in World Cups.

"I didn't think I'd get that much but was happy to. I got a bit of a spray for getting out when Smithy was on 80 in one of the practice games so I thought I'd just try to stick around for a bit," he said.

"Luck went my way. It looked like West Indies were on track the whole way until Starcy took three or four at the end there."

Mitchell Starc continued his remarkable Cricket World Cup record as Australia fought back superbly to defeat West Indies by 15 runs in a thoroughly entertaining affair at Trent Bridge.

The left-arm quick averaged 11 in the competition before Thursday's clash in Nottingham, and his 5-46 improved on that further as he ripped out the Windies' lower order just when it seemed Jason Holder's men were set for a successful chase of 289.

Australia's 288 all out represented an impressive recovery from 38-4, West Indies using the same short-ball tactics that routed Pakistan to good effect once again as four of the top five failed to fire.

Steve Smith was the exception, his patient 73 allowing Alex Carey to up the tempo with 45 before Nathan Coulter-Nile came in and blasted 92 off 60 deliveries – his highest ODI score and the best of any number eight in World Cups.

Shai Hope (68 off 105) played an anchor role similar to that of Smith, while Nicholas Pooran made a more fluent 40 before Holder's half-century looked set to become the match-winning knock.

But when the skipper departed to Starc for 51, he left the tail needing 37 from four overs. Starc then cleaned up Sheldon Cottrell to claim the first five-wicket haul of the tournament as Australia made it two wins from two.

 

 

 

Nathan Coulter-Nile fell eight short of a maiden ODI century as he and Steve Smith inspired Australia's fightback to 288 all out against West Indies at Trent Bridge.

Both sides won their Cricket World Cup openers in straightforward fashion but the Australia batsmen were anything but comfortable in the face of an early barrage of short-pitched bowling, falling to 79-5.

However, Smith (73) combined for a patient stand of 68 alongside Alex Carey, whose dismissal for 45 brought Coulter-Nile to the crease at number eight.

Boasting a previous high score of 34 in ODIs, Coulter-Nile crashed eight fours and four sixes in his 60-ball 92, dominating a century partnership with Smith, who perished in the 45th over to a stunning grab from Sheldon Cottrell.

The left-arm quick, running at full tilt around the boundary, stuck out a big left hand to grab the ball, tossing it in the air as his momentum took him over the ropes before returning to the field to complete an effort that will rival Ben Stokes' for England against South Africa as the catch of the tournament.

Unfortunately for Coulter-Nile, he fell with 10 balls of the innings remaining, holing out to long-off, but his work was done with Australia firmly back in contention.

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