Michael Cuisance's lack of game time at Bayern Munich shows he should never have left Borussia Monchengladbach.

That is the view of Gladbach sporting director Max Eberl, who reluctantly sanctioned the French midfielder's €10million switch in August this year.

Cuisance has made a pair of Bundesliga substitute appearances for Bayern, remaining unused on the bench on 11 other occasions in all competitions.

Minor adductor and groin setbacks have also hindered the 20-year-old, whose former club sit four points ahead of Bayern at the top of the table after 11 matches.

"We told him for three months that he would have been better staying here because he had found in Gladbach a club where he could develop," Eberl told Sport1.

"He had a great development last season. He did not want to settle for that and had other goals in mind for himself, which he has now pursued."

Cuisance will hope the installation of interim head coach Hansi Flick brings about a change of fortunes.

Marco Rose's in-form Gladbach travel to the Allianz Arena to take on Bayern on December 7.

MLS has announced a new format for its annual All-Star game.

To mark the league's 24th season, MLS All-Stars will face Liga MX All-Stars – drawn from Mexico's top flight – at Banc of California Stadium in Los Angeles on July 29.

LAFC head coach and former United States boss Bob Bradley will lead the MLS select side.

"As we celebrate our 25th season, we wanted to deliver an unique and unprecedented format for our annual All-Star Game," MLS commissioner Don Garber said in a statement.

"Our first ever game between the best of MLS and Liga MX’s top players is the perfect way to build on the growing relationship between the two top soccer leagues in the region."

For the past 15 years, MLS All-Stars have played touring European sides including Manchester United, Juventus and Real Madrid.

Their previous victory came with a 2-1 triumph against Tottenham in 2015.

Puerto Rico closed League C Group C play with a 3-0 victory over Anguilla on Tuesday at the Juan Ramon Loubriel Stadium in Bayamon, Puerto Rico.

Puerto Rico opened the scoring in the 56th minute. Rodolfo Sulia tried a long-range shot that was deflected by Anguilla goalkeeper Ryan Liddie. However, Puerto Rico captain Sidney Rivera sprinted forward and knocked in the rebound to give his side the lead.

Rivera doubled his total in the 67th minute, converting from the penalty spot by shooting a low shot to the goalkeeper’s left after Anguilla was whistled for a handball in the box.

Things went from bad to worse for Anguilla minutes later, with defender Kion Lee seeing his second yellow in the 70th minute and taking Anguilla down to 10 men. They also had to replace Liddie, with the captain making a diving save on a set piece but making contact with the post and suffering an injury that required Kareem Burris come in and replace him.

Devin Vega chipped the ball over Burris in the 82nd minute to extend the lead to three, getting on the end of a ball over the top from substitute Jan Mateo.

Guatemala topped the group with a perfect record, while Puerto Rico managed to get six points. Anguilla will go into the next edition of the CNL still looking for its first-ever points.

The Eredivisie and Eerste Divisie have announced a protest against racism that will take place this weekend.

Clubs playing in the first and second tier of Dutch professional football will stand still and not play the first minute of their forthcoming matches.

At the same time, text reading: "Racism? Then we don't play", will appear on stadium screens before the games proceed as normal. A minute of additional time will be played at the end of the first half.

The protest has been inspired by events during last weekend's 3-3 Eerste Divisie draw between Den Bosch and Excelsior, when Excelsior player Ahmad Mendes Moreira was subjected to racist chanting.

Moreira, supported by team-mates, left the pitch 30 minutes in after receiving the abuse, with the referee then calling a temporary halt to the match.

The 24-year-old forward scored after the game resumed and celebrated by cupping his hands to his ears in front of Den Bosch fans, leading the club's coach Erik van der Ven to brand Moreira a "pathetic little man" for trying to goad his side's supporters.

Den Bosch released a statement to say sorry to Moreira, who met Van der Ven on Monday and accepted an apology. The Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB) promised to investigate to identify the perpetrators.

"We want to make clear that enough really is enough by making a statement on the field", a statement from the Eredivisie and Eerste Divisie read.

"We appreciate that all 90 minutes are important for the matches, so we asked the KNVB to add at least one minute of additional time to compensate for the first minute."

Netherlands midfielder Georginio Wijnaldum spoke out in support of Moreira and called for severe sanctions against those responsible when he addressed the media before Tuesday's 5-0 Euro 2020 qualifying win over Estonia.

Wijnaldum scored a hat-trick in the game and celebrated his first goal with an anti-racism statement – holding his arm next to that of team-mate Frenkie de Jong to highlight their different skin colours.

The Liverpool player also tweeted a photo of the whole Netherlands squad doing likewise when standing together in a circle on the training field.

Wijnaldum's tweet was captioned: "ENOUGH IS ENOUGH #STOPRACISM."

El Salvador finished Group B of League B of the 2019-20 Concacaf Nations League with authority by topping the Dominican Republic 2-0 on Tuesday night at the Estadio Cuscatlan in San Salvador.

The 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup and League A-bound Cuscatlecos finished the group with a 5W-0D-1L record, while Dominican Republic were third with a 2W-1D-3L record.

Carlos Portillo picked up where he left off from last Saturday’s win over Montserrat, as he gave La Selecta a 1-0 lead in just the 15’ with a fantastic solo effort.

Portillo received a pass down the left flank and after his initial cross deflected high up in the air, he caught the ball right as it was landing and launched a right-footed volley that rippled the net.

The Central Americans were brimming with confidence and Oscar Ceren looked set to double the lead in the 31’, but his shot from point-blank range was well-saved by Dominican Republic GK Miguel Lloyd.

The Dominican Republic looked to climb back into it, but El Salvador would seal the three points in the 87’ with a goal from Pablo Punyed, whose right-footed finish off a cross from the left completed the 2-0 scoreline.

Montserrat have qualified for the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup playoffs after posting a 1-0 win over Saint Lucia in Group B of League B of the 2019-20 Concacaf Nations League on Tuesday night at the Darren Sammy Cricket Stadium in Gros Islet, Saint Lucia.

The result vaulted Montserrat into second place in the group over the Dominican Republic.

Montserrat started strong as they pressured the Saint Lucia defence in hopes of a first-half goal.

Their efforts would be handsomely rewarded in the 35’ when Joseph Taylor curled in a perfect cross from the right-wing and a surging Nathan Pond smacked the header into goal for a 1-0 Montserrat lead.

Saint Lucia had a chance themselves in the first half through Antonio Joseph but was unable to finish. They then had a second great look at goal in the second half in the 69’ through Jevick McFarlane, but the striker could not land his shot on target.

Montserrat GK Corrin Brooks, who was excellent against El Salvador on Saturday, then became a hero for the visitors with a massive stop on a Kieran Monlouis shot in the 88’ to secure the clean sheet win for Montserrat.

Robert Moreno insists he has "a clear conscience" after his stint as Spain head coach ended with Luis Enrique's return to the role, although he acknowledged "a bittersweet feeling".

Then assistant Moreno stepped into the breach earlier this year when Luis Enrique resigned as his young daughter Xana battled bone cancer. She died in August.

Former Barcelona coach Luis Enrique returned this week, however, replacing Moreno, who had worked alongside him in a number of previous positions.

Moreno has not reverted to his role as assistant amid reports the two have fallen out, although he said in a statement on Wednesday he would not assess his final days as Spain boss, avoiding "a spiral of reproaches and justifications for each of the parties".

But the 42-year-old did thank Luis Enrique, his staff, the RFEF and the media, while also apologising for not addressing reporters after his final match in charge on Monday.

He added in the statement: "I have a clear conscience. It is impossible to please everyone, but I sincerely tell you that I respect all and all opinions.

"I have always maintained that I am a man of my word and would not be an obstacle in the event that Luis Enrique decided to return.

"I have done so even though it has meant my departure. I wish him well because his joys will be ours."

Referring to the "extreme situation" in Luis Enrique's personal life that led to him taking charge, Moreno said he wished he had never been required to become coach.

He concluded: "My experience as an absolute coach began and ended in the same way, with a bittersweet feeling.

"I have to look forward and face new challenges as a coach in my passion, football. I am prepared to face the challenge of leading new projects."

As football fans in the United Kingdom awoke bleary eyed to take in the Premier League story of the season, one word stood out in the statement announcing Jose Mourinho's appointment as Tottenham's head coach – a ghost of hubris past.

"I am excited to be joining a club with such a great heritage and such passionate supporters," Mourinho said.

Heritage. Football heritage.

This was the subject of Mourinho's self-pitying soliloquy in the aftermath of Manchester United's limp Champions League last-16 exit at the hands of Sevilla in March 2018.

A much-trumpeted union that returned two trophies in its first season was going south and Mourinho tried to circle the wagons.

During a 12-minute address where "heritage" was mentioned 10 times, his general point was he had been dealt a duff hand at United. Other rivals were better equipped, having spent more money more effectively to breed cultures of sustained success.

One of the flaws in his argument – there were a few – was the reality of him talking as the manager of Manchester United, the 20-time champions of England. He selected an £89.3million midfielder on the bench for the 2-1 loss to Sevilla at Old Trafford, where he trudged the technical area forlornly under the glare of the Sir Alex Ferguson Stand.

Much as he would talk in reverent terms of his second-place in the Premier League that season, 19 points behind champions Manchester City, Mourinho failed at United.

Another press conference rant, where he exited the room demanding "respect" from those present, came after a 3-0 home loss to Spurs five months on from the Sevilla debacle. Mourinho was a man who had lost the thread and any notion of him succeeding Mauricio Pochettino, who so comprehensively bested him that night, felt beyond absurd at that moment.

Underdog, not top dog

Similarly, the 2011-12 LaLiga title triumph at Real Madrid took a heavy toll upon coach and squad alike, with his Santiago Bernabeu tenure concluding unsatisfactorily 12 months later. When in charge of greats of the game, clubs familiar with prolonged and recent success, Mourinho's schtick came up short.

His greatest deeds played out in sharply contrasting circumstances.

No team outside Europe's "big five" leagues had won the Champions League in the eight years before Mourinho masterminded Porto's march to glory in 2003-04 and none have since.

Chelsea were flushed with Roman Abramovich's riches but had not won an English championship since 1954-55. The self-proclaimed Special One delivered two in two seasons after arriving at Stamford Bridge as a freshly minted European champion.

Mourinho reacquainted himself with the continent's big trophy at Inter. The 2009-10 Champions League was the Nerazzuri's third win in the competition but first since 1964-65.

That triumph symbolically came at the Bernabeu, with the big job lying in wait for a man who had defined a decade in European club football. It concluded Mourinho's imperial period.

The rancour and recriminations of the past nine years leads to an understandable conclusion Tottenham have appointed a downgrade on Pochettino, replacing one of football's brightest contemporary minds with yesterday's man.

But if anything should encourage tentative enthusiasm for the third act of Mourinho's coaching career at the elite level, it is that Spurs bear more resemblance to the Porto, Chelsea and Inter teams he took hold of than Madrid or United.

Pochettino's sustained excellent over the past five seasons in north London does not mean the scars of "Spursy", "St Totteringham's Day" and other mockery do not still sting a little for a club starved of trophy success. Spurs feels like a place where Mourinho can promise the world and demand everyone falls into line far more effectively than when in charge of a superclub.

Those are the jobs Mourinho aspires to – and probably the roles Pochettino will grace soon enough – but it is hard to escape the feeling he has always been better suited to the rung below, with a point to prove and the spite to fuel a siege mentality his men will buy into. 

Alli as Lampard, Kane as Drogba?

So, what of that squad? That all important heritage.

It feels safe to say Mourinho is far happier with his lot than when he walked into Old Trafford. Not least because the likes of Danny Rose, Toby Alderweireld, Eric Dier and Harry Kane were all touted as United targets when he was in Manchester.

His best teams have featured a potent striker willing to work hard for the cause, hard running wingers and a goalscoring threat from attacking midfield. Kane, Son Heung-min, Lucas Moura and Dele Alli in tandem could feel instantly more "Mourinho" than anything he threw together at United.

Behind them, a combination of Dier and club-record signing Tanguy Ndombele feel equipped to provide the power and control his most dominant engine rooms boasted.

As for an aging Tottenham defence, they will probably welcome the defensive line being dropped a touch deeper, in line with their new boss' more reactive principles. Indeed, a squad featuring seasoned, maturing professionals arguably come under Mourinho's charge at the right time – no longer the all-action, do-or-die tyros who served Pochettino so well until recently.

"It's a privilege when a manager goes to a club and feels happiness in relation to the squad that he's going to have," a suited and smiling Mourinho told Spurs TV. The smile won't last over the course of a three-and-a-half year contract – it never does – but in the meantime, he might just have found the right place to earn a little more of that respect he craves.

In their final match of the first edition of the Concacaf Nations League, Saint Martin travelled to the US Virgin Islands and picked up a 2-1 victory.

The best chance of the first half for the home side came in the 27th minute when Jimson St-Louis made a fantastic move on the right side of the box and sent a rocket into the far post that nearly put the Dashing Eagle in front.

In the 39th minute, Saint Martin grabbed the first goal of the match when Andy Felsina sent in a beautiful ball onto the head of a diving Yannick Chevalier.

Rakeem Joseph was shown red in the 47th minute, and Yannick Bellechasse immediately capitalized on the man advantage by scoring a long-range curler to put Saint Martin ahead 2-0 in the 49th minute.

Showing great spirit, Ramesses McGuinness breathed life back into the home team with a perfectly placed shot inside the post during the 69th minute. Despite the home side’s best efforts, an equalizer never came.

The result was Saint Martin’s third win in their past four games, and they finish the group stage in third place with nine points. The US Virgin Islands finish fourth in the group with three points.

Barbados earned their most significant win in recent history when they edged out the Cayman Islands 3-0 on the Wildey Astroturf on Tuesday night.

It had all come down to the final match in League C Group A, in which Barbados needed a victory on home turf to achieve the coveted promotion to League B.

The Turtles took the game to the hosts in the early goings, employing a high press and keeping most of the action near the Bajan goal in the opening 20 minutes.

But after surviving the initial assault, Barbados grew into the game and eventually struck first in the 32nd minute when Hallam Hope poked a header into the far corner.

The Tridents got a boost of momentum from the goal and really took control of the game from that point on, though the Cayman Islands continued to threaten on numerous set pieces as the night wore on.

Armando Lashley scored the dagger in the 86th minute, a clean finish just under the crossbar. Hope added a third in the 90th.

Barbados finish in first ahead of the Cayman Islands on goal differential, with both teams ending the group stage with 12 points.

The RFEF's Technical Committee of Referees is making changes for the Supercopa de Espana, introducing goal-line technology for the first time while improving communication for VAR decisions.

A revamped Supercopa will take place in Saudi Arabia in January, with Real Madrid, Barcelona, Atletico Madrid and Valencia involved.

For the first time in Spanish football, goal-line technology will be implemented in order to aid officials, with previous such calls made with the help of the VAR.

Referees chief Carlos Velasco Carballo explained on Wednesday: "The system consists of 14 cameras on the pitch. A high resolution camera will be on the goal line.

"This system is connected to the referees and, in less than a second, you hear the word 'goal' three times and the watch will vibrates to indicate the goal.

"It's historic in Spanish football."

The use of VAR in the first part of the LaLiga season was also discussed, with Velasco Carballo revealing the system had corrected 19 of 23 officiating errors.

Criticism of VAR has often come from the way calls are communicated to supporters within the stadium, but Velasco Carballo has outlined plans to improve this problem for the Supercopa.

A "Vardict" system on screens aims to ensure fans are kept up to date.

He said: "It will serve to communicate the decisions to the spectators in the stadium, a fundamental aspect in the success of the VAR. They will have the same information as the spectators watching on television."

The United States confirmed its place in the summer 2020 Concacaf Nations League Final Four with a 4-0 victory over Cuba at the Truman Bodden Sports Complex in George Town, Cayman Islands putting the U.S. atop Group A of League A.

Tottenham have agreed a deal with Lille to bring in coaches Joao Sacramento and Nuno Santos to work with Jose Mourinho.

Former Chelsea and Manchester United boss Mourinho was appointed Spurs' new head coach on Wednesday following Mauricio Pochettino's departure the previous day.

Spurs moved quickly to begin securing the desired backroom setup for their new coach, as Lille confirmed the departure of Sacramento and Santos.

Tottenham have reportedly paid £3million for the duo, with Sacramento expected to become Mourinho's assistant. Santos joins as goalkeeping coach.

"To Joao Sacramento and Nuno Santos, LOSC wish all the success in this new project," a Lille statement read.

ESPN report Spurs may yet return to Lille for sporting director Luis Campos, who previously worked with Mourinho at Real Madrid.

Pochettino's time at Tottenham saw numerous reports of tensions between the manager and chairman Daniel Levy over transfers.

The arrival of Campos as sporting director would seemingly act as a buffer, and Mourinho is said to have funds to make signings in January.

Robert Lewandowski is enjoying an outstanding start to the season with Bayern Munich but insists there is room for him to get even better.

The Poland international has 23 goals in 18 club matches so far this term, more than any other player in Europe's top leagues.

However, Lewandowski believes he is only now approaching his peak and can improve further, insisting he does not feel his 31 years.

"I worked very hard for this form. Currently it is going perfectly, my body feels good," he told Sport Bild.

"It's good to have that in mind, but it does not mean that I'm resting. I want to get even better.

"I know when I can do more and when I need to slow down. My passport says: 'Robert Lewandowski, 31 years old'. But that's not how I feel.

"My best spell is just starting now and hopefully will continue for some more years. The best is yet to come."

Lewandowski is set to return to club action following the international break on Saturday, as Bayern visit Fortuna Dusseldorf.

Thomas Delaney has suffered torn ligaments in his right ankle and will be out of action until January.

Borussia Dortmund confirmed the nature of the 28-year-old's injury on Wednesday after he returned from international duty.

Midfielder Delaney was substituted 13 minutes into Denmark's crucial Euro 2020 qualifier against Republic of Ireland on Monday, unable to assist his country as they secured a 1-1 draw to qualify for the finals.

Delaney has played six times in the Bundesliga this season, having appeared 30 times last term following his move from Werder Bremen.

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