An Australia court has thrown out an appeal by media group Fairfax, which would have annulled damages owed to Windies star Chris Gayle who won a defamation suit against the entity last year.

Gayle took the publishers to court after allegations that he exposed himself to a female masseuse during the 2015 World Cup came out in several of its publications.  More specifically, it was alleged that the batsman exposed his penis and indecently propositioned the woman in a dressing room during the tournament.

The jury sided with the player, who strongly denied the allegations, in finding that the publishers acted with malice and accorded the cricketer damages amounting to US$211,000.  In its appeal, however, Fairfax argued that the jury should have been discharged after Gayle’s attorney attacked the credibility of the masseuse.  In response, the player’s legal team had appealed to increase the size of the payout to the West Indian star. Both appeals were dismissed.

 Fairfax newspapers are now owned by commercial broadcaster Nine Entertainment, which purchased the media company last year.

Soon to be retired Windies star Chris Gayle is confident the future of the region’s cricket is in safe hands having made his final appearance at an ICC World Cup on Thursday.

It was not the perfect swansong the veteran batsman might have envisioned heading into the tournament.  The Windies earmarked by few as dark horses won a mere two games and finished second to last.

The typically prolific batsman also showed signs that perhaps time was finally catching up, as he struggled to get going at the crease.  In nine matches the Windies talisman could only manage 242 runs.  In the final match against Afghanistan, Gayle was dismissed for seven, his third single-figure score of the tournament.  The result means the batsman remained second on West Indies' all-time list of ODI run-scorers, 10 behind Brian Lara.

“The future looks bright, with (Shimron) Hetmyer, (Shai) Hope, (Nicholas) Pooran… Those guys will carry the flag and make sure West Indies cricket is back to where it belongs,” Gayle said following the match.

“They have a young captain in Jason Holder as well. They have to rally around,” he added.

“We also have Andre Russell who is around. I like Pooran and Hetmyer, as those guys can be devastating as batsmen. They need to get a bit more mature quickly. We know what they’re all capable of.”

 

West Indies bowling legend Curtly Ambrose believes a new generation of cricketers must lose the label of ‘power hitting team’ if they are to take another major step in a positive direction.

Heading into the ongoing ICC World Cup, the Windies were picked as a dark horse by pundits and fans alike, in part due to a powerful batting line.  Several disappointing performances at the crease later, however, the regional team failed to live up to the promise of a truly powerful batting display.  

Despite boasting a few inexperienced players, however, Ambrose believes the team’s issues are down to the ‘boundary first’ mentality of several players.

“It’s not the experience and it’s not technique.  I don’t think there is anything wrong with their skills.  I have said before and I will continue to say that they need to put some more thought into their cricket,” Ambrose told BBC Sound.

If they can think situations through a little bit better they can get over that last hurdle,” he added.

“You have to respect good bowling at times…they have this notion that they are power hitters and they can hit boundaries.  Even if the bowling is really good they sill believe they can blast their way out.  That’s not how cricket is played, you have to respect good bowling.  You wait and you keep the ones and twos going, which they don’t do often.

So when they are not getting the boundaries they are not getting the ones and twos.  So they try even harder to get the boundaries and keep getting out.”

Windies bowling legend Curtly Ambrose has dismissed the idea of veteran batsman Chris Gayle playing what would amount to a farewell Test series against India next month.

The 39-year-old Windies talisman was expected to announce his retirement from international cricket following the ICC World Cup.  The big left-hander, however, seemed to have a change of heart during the tournament and targeted India’s tour of the West Indies as his final appearance.

Never one to shy away from speaking his mind, Ambrose has flatly rejected any type of sentimental appearance for the opener.

“Let me tell you something, one word; nonsense,” Ambrose said of Gayle’s plans for going beyond the World Cup.

Despite scoring 7,214 Test runs, which puts him eighth on the all-time list, and notching two triple centuries, Gayle has not made a Test appearance for the West Indies since 2014.

“He hasn’t played Test cricket for five years and he can barely make it in a One Day International, with long periods in the field.  A Test match is five days, six hours every day and he hasn’t does it for five years,” Ambrose told BBC Sounds.

“What kind of message would it send to one of the opening batsmen? ‘It’s a farewell game for Chris Gayle so sit this one out’ - that is utter nonsense,” he added.

“He should bow out of this World Cup gracefully. He’s done extremely well for West Indies in world cricket, but you bow out. Move forward.”

 

 

 

It was like West Indies skipper Jason Holder was discovering a surprise gift, hearing the news Chris Gayle planned to play on after the World Cup. 

West Indies skipper Jason Holder had high praises for his charges despite coming out on the losing end of another ICC World Cup game maybe they should have won. 

After a convincing 106-run victory over Bangladesh, England will be up against a vibrant West Indies unit in their fourth match of the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2019.

After a shocking defeat to Pakistan, England aced every department against Bangladesh, as they first put up 386/6 on board and then bundled them out for 280 in the 49th over. The openers, determined not to fall into the trap of spin bowling, gave a perfect start, as Jason Roy stroked his way to 153. While Stokes has been giving some priceless overs with the ball, Moeen Ali is likely to return in the playing eleven, considering the number of left handers in the West Indies line-up.

On the other hand, the West Indies' bowlers might have lit up the tournament so far but it was the lack of application on the batting front that cost them the game against Australia. Their pacers started well against South Africa too, with Sheldon Cottrell picking up two early wickets, before no further play was possible due to rain interruption. The batsmen will have to step up, to set it up for their bowlers who will be challenged by the never-ending English batting line-up.

Once their very own, now their adversary, Jofra Archer will look to defy Chris Gayle and others, promising an exciting contest within a contest at the Hampshire Bowl on Friday.

Key Players

Eoin Morgan (England): The England captain is yet to produce an innings that would match his stature in the tournament so far. Morgan, who averages 76.25 at the Hampshire Bowl and was the highest run-scorer for England in the ODI series against West Indies earlier this year, might be the biggest threat to his opponents on Friday.

Chris Gayle (West Indies): Chris Gayle had lit up the tournament with a power-packed 50 against Pakistan but could last only till the fifth over against Australia. The Universe Boss relishes batting against England averaging 51.42 against the hosts, contrary to his career average of 38.14 and will look to stamp his authority early on in the innings.

It would be a cloudy start to the day which would assist the fast bowlers early on, tempting the captains to field first. The afternoon will see rain becoming a bit showery with some brighter spells developing later.

Squads

England: Eoin Morgan (c), Moeen Ali, Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow, Jos Buttler (wk), Tom Curran, Liam Dawson, Liam Plunkett, Adil Rashid, Joe Root, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, James Vince, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

West Indies: Jason Holder (c), Fabian Allen, Darren Bravo, Shannon Gabriel, Shimron Hetmyer, Evin Lewis, Nicholas Pooran, Andre Russell, Carlos Brathwaite, Sheldon Cottrell, Chris Gayle, Shai Hope, Ashley Nurse, Kemar Roach, Oshane Thomas

 West Indies bowling coach Cory Collymore is confident the team’s star batsman Chris Gayle will relish the challenge of facing Barbadian-born pace bowler Jofra Archer.

The Windies are booked to face England in what is expected to be a thrilling contest at the Rose Bowl Cricket Ground on Friday.  Despite being in the twilight of his career, Gayle remains a formidable force at the top of the Caribbean team’s batting order and his match-up against the up and coming pace bowler Archer is expected to be one of the highlights of the match.  Having claimed six-wickets so far and regularly reaching speeds in excess of 90mph, Archer is having a splendid tournament to date.  Collymore is, however, confident that Gayle will rise to the challenge.

"Chris thrives on that.  I have known him since he was 16 and he has always loved a challenge," said Collymore said.

"He has always enjoyed the challenge of fast bowling so I expect him to relish that. I have known Archer for a while and I saw (Mark) Wood in the Caribbean last year,” he added.

"They are both very impressive, as we have seen throughout this tournament."

Wood faces a late fitness test ahead of the encounter.

Windies fast bowling legend Michael Holding has hit out at what he terms attempts at ‘censorship’ from the ICC, after formal requests made by the cricket body to cut down on criticism of umpires on air.

The former West Indies paceman was heavily critical of the umpiring during the West Indies vs Australia last week.  He was, however, far from the only one as the game featured several high-profile errors.

West Indies opener Chris Gayle was given out twice, while facing an over from Mitchell Starc, with both calls later overturned via the decisions review system.  The batsman was dismissed lbw in the next over from Starc but replays showed the previous delivery had been a huge no-ball. The ball that dismissed the West Indian should, therefore, have been free hit.

Later, two more on-field decisions were overturned. The first was reviewed by Jason Holder after he was initially sent back to the pavilion lbw, sweeping to Glenn Maxwell, the ball just pitching outside leg.

Holder then successfully reviewed once more, attempting to sweep Adam Zampa, with ball-tracker showing the ball would have comfortably missed leg stump. 

Holding, who called the umpiring ‘atrocious’, expressed the belief that the officials were being pressured by strong appeals from the players.

In response, the ICC in an email to Holding and other commentators pointed out “the importance of maintaining the highest standards and uphold the game’s best values and spirit while covering the tournament”.

Never one to hold back on his opinions, the player turned pundit claimed commentators were being increasingly “compromised by controlling organisations to the point of censorship”.

“If those umpires were FIFA officials, they would have been told to pack their bags and head home. They would not have been given another World Cup game to officiate. As a former cricketer, I think cricket should be held to a higher standard. Is the objective to protect the umpires even when they do a bad job?” Holding said in a reply accessed and published by The Times of India newspaper.

 “I am sorry, but I am not going to be part of that. Please let me know if I should be heading back to my home in Newmarket instead of heading to Cardiff because I don’t agree with what is being suggested here and happy not being part of it.”

England pace bowler Mark Wood believes the best way to tackle West Indies talisman Chris Gayle is with the raw pace of Barbadian-born speedster Jofra Archer.

The match-up between Archer and Gayle is likely to be one of the key ones when the Windies face the hosts at the Rose Bowl Cricket Ground on Friday. 

A belligerent Gayle dominated the bowling the last time the teams met in the One Day International (ODI) format, which ended in a 2-2 draw in the Caribbean.  It was Gayle who was named man-of-the-series after finishing it with 424 runs at an average of 106, with 39 sixes.

Archer was, however, not a part of the squad on that occasion and has since had a splendid World Cup.  In addition to his express pace rattling batsmen, the bowler has claimed figures of 6 for 135.  Wood is confident his bowling partner can slow the big West Indian down.

“Get Jofra to bowl at him!” was Wood ‘solution to the Gayle conundrum.

“He is destructive and on his day he is hard to stop. In the West Indies, he was in great form, but you didn’t know how he was going to play. Some days he would get himself in and take his time and other days he would go ballistic from ball one,” he added.

Windies batting star Chris Gayle was not allowed to use a specially branded ‘Universe Boss’ bat for the ICC Cricket World Cup.

According to reports, the 39-year-old batsman had sought special permission from the International Cricket Council (ICC) to imprint his moniker on the bat ahead of the tournament.  The request would, however, have violated the ICC code as its related to the displaying of messages.  The issue came to the fore after the ICC on Friday also denied India wicketkeeper batsman Mahendra Singh Dhoni permission to wear a dagger insignia on his wicket-keeping gloves.

"The regulations for ICC events do not permit any individual message or logo to be displayed on any items of clothing or equipment,” the ICC said.

"ICC couldn't have made an exception for Dhoni as no personal messages are allowed on equipment. Gayle wanted it but when he was refused permission, he accepted it and moved on," an official privy to the details of the situation later told the media.

During India’s World Cup 2019 opener against South Africa at Ageas Bowl in Southampton on June 5, MS Dhoni sported a pair of wicketkeeping gloves with regimental dagger insignia of the Indian Para Special Forces.  He has since had to remove the symbol.

In-form batsman Shai Hope led a powerful Windies performance at the crease, which saw the regional team pile on 421 to register a 91-run win over New Zealand in the team’s final ICC World Cup cricket warm-up match.

 On a flat surface at a small Bristol County Ground, the smattering of fans on hand was treated to a superb display of hitting as the Caribbean team dispatched the ball to all parts of the ground.

The innings started off with a bang thanks to an opening stand between Chris Gayle and Evin Lewis that was worth 59 runs from just 44 balls, with Gayle doing the majority of the scoring before he fell for a 22-ball 36. Lewis was more sedate, making 50 from 54 balls before he was dismissed by Jimmy Neesham.

Lewis didn’t have to force the pace, thanks to Hope who looked to attack as soon as he walked to the crease. Even with a long boundary to the west of the ground, the West Indies batsmen found no difficulty in clearing the ropes, with 18 sixes in their innings.

The most powerful hitting came from Andre Russell, who scored 54 off 25. One six, smashed towards the Ashley Down Road end of the ground, almost cleared the flats, hitting the building four floors up.

In an innings that was all about big-hitting, it would have been pleasing for the New Zealanders to see Trent Boult take 4 for 50, going at less than a run a ball. He was the one Black Caps bowler who could keep the rate down.

It was always going to be difficult for New Zealand to chase that massive total, but early wickets made the task more difficult. Needing more than eight an over from the start of their innings they stumbled to 33 for 3 in the 10th over with Martin Guptill, Henry Nichols and Ross Taylor all falling cheaply.

A brilliant stand of 120 between Kane Williamson and Tom Blundell would have kept a team in the contest on another day, but here, with the rate steadily rising, even 85 from 64 balls from Williamson and 106 from 89 from Blundell were not enough for New Zealand.

However, runs for Blundell, the stand-in keeper, will be a boost for the Black Caps with injury concerns around Tom Latham. They will kick off their World Cup campaign against Sri Lanka on Saturday, 1 June, while the Windies will take on Pakistan the previous day.

Xavier Marshall, as a youngster, was one of the most promising batsmen out of Jamaica. The opener had been in and around the West Indies setup, debuting with the bat at just 19 years old.

But migration to the United States and maybe a life outside of cricket beckoned for the talented batsman, who had some disciplinary issues hamper his progress.

Then nothing.

Marshall would turn up again as one of the more prominent players on the United States cricket team, and, in fact, just recently, scored a century to give his side One Day International status.

Now, Marshall has come full circle, returning to play for the Jamaica-based Tallawahs in the 2019 season of the Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL).

Marshall was picked in the 17th and final round of the draft for a team he may struggle to feature in, but the opener, for at least the month of September, is back home.

The Tallawahs should not be in need of an opener like Marshall with the return of Chadwick Walton from the Guyana Amazon Warriors and Chris Gayle from the St Kitts and Nevis Patriots.

The two have opened the innings in successful CPL campaigns for the Tallawahs, who are chasing a record fourth title along with the Trinbago Knight Riders, and the Jamaican franchise may be reluctant to change their tried and tested combination.

There is also Glenn Phillips, Rovman Powell, and the big-hitting Andre Russell in the middle order, who may prove hard to replace as well.

The Tallawahs seem to have a balanced unit that will be hard to pick an eleven from game to game. While the batting seems settled, the allrounders and bowling department throws up interesting challenges.

There is George Worker, from New Zealand, who is listed as a batting allrounder. Worker will go up against Shamar Springer for a place in the lower order. Both are very decent bowlers in the T20 version of the game and could demand places.

But then there is the presence of Zahir Khan, who should also be a certainty.

The arrival of Christopher Lamont, Ramaal Lewis, Steven Jacobs, Derval Green and Imran Khan means the fight for spots among the bowlers will be interesting to watch.

Another certainty is the pacey Oshane Thomas, who has impressed since his arrival on the scene in the last Hero CPL, earning for himself a place at this year’s ICC World Cup in England.

Another allrounder in the mix is Pakistan’s Amad Butt, who plies his trade for Islamabad United in the Pakistan Super League. The allrounder is making his debut in the CPL but it is not known what part he will play with the number of allrounders in the Tallawahs line-up who have serious quality.

Windies star batsman Chris Gayle is well aware that he will be the target of young upcoming fast bowlers when the ICC World Cup gets under way later this month but has cautioned that he will be ready.

The 39-year-old batsman, who has long been a standard of attacking cricket, will take part in his swansong for the West Indies at a fifth tournament.  Despite being one of the game’s elder statesmen the self-styled Universe boss devastating attacking capability was on full display against England in March. 

The veteran batsman was named man of the series after amassing 429 runs in four matches at an average of 106.  Many pundits and fans have tipped Gayle to carry that good form into the tournament but not if the bowlers have a say in the matter and he has slowed down just a bit.

"Youngsters coming at my head - it's not as easy as it was like one time before," Gayle told cricket.com. "I was quicker then.

"But they'll be wary. They know what the Universe Boss is capable of. I'm sure they will have it in the back of their mind, 'Hey, this is the most dangerous batsman they've ever seen in cricket,” he added.

Two-time champions West Indies begin their campaign against 1992 winners Pakistan on May 31 at Trent Bridge.

 

West Indies vice-captain Chris Gayle said his only focus is trying to win the World Cup, as he has nothing to prove.

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