NFL

Trevor Lawrence confident of being ready for training camp

By Sports Desk February 12, 2021

Trevor Lawrence is confident the timeline for his recovery from surgery on a torn labrum will allow him to be back in time for his first NFL training camp.

Lawrence had a pro day at Clemson on Friday in which he threw for NFL teams ahead of April's draft, in which he is considered a lock to go number one to the Jacksonville Jaguars.

He put himself through that workout, attended by Jaguars head coach Urban Meyer, despite a torn labrum in his non-throwing shoulder.

Lawrence is now set to have surgery to correct that issue, but the prospect who is viewed by many as the best quarterback to come out of college since Andrew Luck in 2012 appears to have no concerns about being ready for training camp in July.

"Obviously, I've got to still continue talking to the doctors and see how the rehab goes, but I think I can throw in six-to-eight weeks after the surgery," he told ESPN. 

"And then looking at a four-to-five-month full clearance. But obviously, I'll be able to do stuff before then.

"But I'm just glad it's my non-throwing shoulder, so shouldn't be too bad. Just got to rehab really hard and work hard to get back.

"But I'm just excited to get that fixed and start that road to getting healthy."

Asked for his thoughts on his pro day, Lawrence replied: "I was pretty pleased with it.

"Obviously, like anything, you have some throws that you wish you could go back and hit a little bit better. But as a whole, I think it was a good day."

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