Brazil, Colombia and Japan will rival Australia and New Zealand for the right to host the 2023 Women's World Cup.

A joint bid from Football Federation Australia (FFA) and New Zealand Football (NZF) for the first 32-team edition of the competition was announced in Melbourne earlier on Friday.

FIFA has now confirmed that the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), Colombian Football Federation (FCF) and Japan Football Association (JFA) all submitted bids prior to the December 13 deadline.

A proposed joint bid from North and South Korea was not included in the final shortlist, with the Korea Football Association (KFA) having withdrawn their application, citing diplomatic tension between the two countries.

An assessment of the bids will now follow, which includes inspection visits to each member association, likely in January and February of next year.

The eligible bids will then be presented to the FIFA Council, which will select the host at a meeting in Addis Ababa in June 2020.

"France 2019 was certainly a watershed moment for women's football, and now it is FIFA's responsibility to take concrete measures to keep fostering the game's incredible growth," said FIFA president Gianni Infantino.

"With the FIFA Women's World Cup generating an unprecedented interest across member associations, we are ensuring that the process to select the hosts is seamless, objective, ethical and transparent.

"By the time the FIFA Council announces the hosts, there should be no doubt whatsoever as to why that choice was made."

The United States won the 2019 World Cup, beating Netherlands 2-0 in the final in Lyon to defend the trophy they claimed in 2015.

Australia and New Zealand have come together to submit a bid to co-host the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Football Federation Australia (FFA) and New Zealand Football (NZF) confirmed the joint bid in Melbourne on Friday.

The move was made with FIFA expanding the tournament from 24 teams to 32 in 2023.

"As trusted members of FIFA, FFA and NZF are committed to hosting an excellent Women's World Cup that delivers real benefits for the game not only during tournament time, but in the lead up to the competition and afterwards," FFA chairman Chris Nikou said in a statement.

"The decision to host the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2023 in Australia and New Zealand, two leading nations in the promotion of women's football and gender equality, will accelerate the game at both the grassroots and professional levels, lighting a path for future generations of footballers, administrators, and fans in Asia-Pacific."

NZF president Johanna Wood said: "NZF and FFA are excited to be joining together 'As One' to bid for the FIFA Women's World Cup 2023. The opportunity to partner, across not just member association boundaries but also confederation boundaries, represents a new level of cooperation for football.

"I would like to thank the team who have worked tirelessly to get our submission together which is no mean feat but, more importantly, demonstrates the strong relationship between our two nations and member associations."

Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Japan and South Korea, potentially alongside North Korea, are also set to bid to host the tournament.

Megan Rapinoe, Lucy Bronze and Alex Morgan lead the nominees for the 2019 Ballon d'Or Femenin in the award's second year.

Publication France Football revealed their 20-woman shortlist on Monday, acknowledging the successes of Lyon and United States in particular.

Women's Champions League winners Lyon have six players in the running, including Bronze and 2018 winner Ada Hegerberg, though the latter is not thought to be among the favourites given her World Cup absence.

United States lifted the trophy in France and four of their squad have been nominated, with Tobin Heath, Rose Lavelle, Morgan and Rapinoe flying the USA flag.

Rapinoe is regarded by many as the favourite, however, with the Reign FC star inspirational in the World Cup campaign, finishing joint top-scorer on six with Ellen White and Morgan, while she also added three assists.

She won the Golden Boot and Golden Ball in France, before also taking home The Best FIFA Women's Player award, edging out Morgan. Bronze came third.

Full list of nominees:

Lucy Bronze (Lyon), Ellen White (Manchester City), Sam Kerr (Chicago Red Stars), Nilla Fischer (Wolfsburg), Amandine Henry (Lyon), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride), Vivianne Miedema (Arsenal), Dzenifer Marozsan (Lyon), Pernille Harder (Wolfsburg), Sarah Bouhaddi (Lyon), Megan Rapinoe (Reign FC), Lieke Martens (Barcelona), Sari van Veenendal (Atletico Madrid), Wendie Renard (Lyon), Rose Lavelle (Washington Spirit), Marta (Orlando Pride), Ada Hegerberg (Lyon), Kosovare Asllani, Sofia Jakobsson (both CD Tacon/Real Madrid), Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns).

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