Usain Bolt donated J$500,000 (approximately USD$3500) to the Jamaica-Together-We-Stand telethon that raised funds to help fight the spread of COVID-19.

Oops, Britney Spears has done it again.

Sport may have been disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic, but a new 100 metres standard has been set - according to a popstar with knowledge of records.

With the United States observing social distancing due to COVID-19, Britney has seemingly been using her loneliness to improve her 100m time and now has an outrageous claim.

The world record has stood at 9.58 seconds since Usain Bolt's Berlin dash in 2009, while Florence Griffith-Joyner still boasts the women's benchmark, her 10.49-second run unsurpassed since 1988.

But Britney, who says her times have steadily been getting stronger, believes she has beaten both - and by a considerable margin, too.

She posted a screenshot of a timer stopped on 5.97 seconds to her Instagram page, explaining her feat.

"Ran my first 5!!!! Getting over your fear of pushing it in the beginning is key," she wrote. "Once I did that, I hit 5!!!!!

"Usually I run 6 or 7. My first try was 9. And now I did it, whoop!!!!! 100-metre dash!!!!!"

Perhaps her supposed achievement will tempt Jamaican great Bolt out of retirement to post just one more time.

Glen Mills, former coach of retired sprint king Usain Bolt, would advise the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to push the Tokyo Olympic Games to next year.

So far, the IOC has resisted calls from several high-profile athletes, coaches, and even athletics associations, to postpone the games in light of the current coronavirus pandemic.  In the latest twist, the IOC has flatly rejected the idea of cancellation but is expected to take a decision on whether to postpone the Games, set to start on July 24.

Mills, however, admits that he cannot see the event being staged before next year, following the already massive disruptions to the schedule.

"I can’t see the Olympics going ahead; taking persons from all over the world and bringing them to one central point,” Mills said in a recent interview with Reuters.

"My recommendation would be to postpone the Olympics until next year,” he said.

“This would be unprecedented, but we are in unprecedented time. Move everything up one year and then everything will eventually fall back in place,” he added.

"But I don’t think that the Olympics will take place at the time that is specified (July and August) because the outbreak is worldwide and, in some countries,, it is just starting to accelerate.”

The Olympics has only been canceled on three occasions 1916, 1940 and 1944 in all those cases the scrapping of the Games was due to World wars I and II.

Jamaica sprint queen, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, believes compatriot Usain Bolt may have stepped away from the sport of track and field too early.

Bolt and Fraser-Pryce were the biggest stars in a decade of sprint dominance for Jamaica.  Between them, the duo racked up 20 World Championship gold medals and 10 Olympic gold medals.  However, while the evergreen Fraser-Pryce continues to dazzle the world with her prowess on the track, Bolt hung up his spikes in 2017.

At the age of 33, Fraser-Pryce created history by becoming the first athlete to claim four 100m World Championship titles, in an event not known for its longevity and consistency.  Bolt has three and Fraser-Pryce who took two years off after having her first child before returning to the top of sprinting, believes it could have been more.

“I don’t think it was ok for him to quit just yet.  I think he had more time in him, but I think he was a little tired and doesn’t like the training that much,” Fraser-Pryce said in a recent interview.

“I definitely think he misses it because he can see what I’m doing.  He messages me all the time and says it’s amazing to see what you are doing and I tell him you could still have been doing what I have been doing.”

Retired Jamaica sprint legend Usain Bolt admits to missing the sport of athletics and once mulled the idea of coming out of retirement but was convinced he had made the right decision by his former coach Glen Mills.

Bolt, considered in many arenas as the greatest sprinter of all time, amassed stellar achievements in a career that lasted well over a decade.  In addition to holding the world record over both the 100m and 200m sprints, the Jamaican claimed 8 Olympic gold and 11 World Championship medals.

His soaring career might, however, be said to have ended on somewhat of a low after finishing third at the 2017 World Championships and failing to finish in the 4x100m relay. 

 "I talked to my track coach," Bolt told CNN Sport's Coy Wire. "And he was like, 'No, you're not doing it. People that retire and come back -- it doesn't always work out.'

The sprinter, who suffers from scoliosis of the spine, was quick to admit that he also did not miss the grueling training needed to compete at the highest level.

"For me, at the end I knew it was time because the drive wasn't there. But every time I watch track and field I miss it. And every time I go to the track to see my coach and I watch him training I go, 'Did I make the right decision?' ... But every time I train with them I think, 'Ah yeah I made the right decision. I don't miss this.'"

Former sprinter and Jamaica’s most decorated male sprinter of all time, Usain Bolt, has added his take on whether Kansas City Chiefs’ Super Bowl-winning wide receiver, Tyreek Hill, can make the U.S. Olympic team as a sprinter.

 Reigning world record holder and soon to be dad Usain Bolt insists he would not encourage his children to follow in his footsteps.

The Jamaican sprint king, who retired from the sport in 2016, is considered one of the greatest athletes of all time.  News of the track star about to father a child perhaps for many conjured images of someday having the next generation of the Bolt family continuing his rich legacy.  Not, however, if the sprinter can help it.

“I’m going to say no, initially.  If they do, I will support it,” Bolt said in an interview with The Times.

“I think the pressure is going to be too much, especially at the level I left it. It’s going to be tough to follow,” he added.

Matching the feats of Bolt would indeed take some doing.  The athlete dominated the sport of track and field for over a decade, winning 8 Olympic gold medals and 11 World Championships.

“You have to wait until they get to a certain age to explain to them that people are going to expect a lot from you, because of what I’ve done in the past.  I’ll wait until the time is right to explain.”

Sporting stars from across the globe, including Tom Brady and Neymar, have paid tribute to Kobe Bryant after the Los Angeles Lakers icon was killed in a helicopter crash.

Bryant, 41, died on Sunday in a crash close to the city of Calabasas in Los Angeles County, California.

Eight others on board, including his 13-year-old daughter Gianna, also lost their lives.

Following the initial reports of Bryant's passing, athletes and teams from across the world of sport posted their tributes to the Lakers great on social media.

New England Patriots great Brady wrote on his Twitter page: "We miss you already, Kobe."

Patrick Mahomes, another superstar NFL quarterback, said: "Man, not Kobe. Prayers to his family and friends!"

Bryant was an Olympic champion like Usain Bolt, the great sprinter, who posted a picture of the former NBA star on his page.

"Still can't believe ⁦[it] @kobebryant," he said.

World number one golfer Brooks Koepka posted a lengthy message in memory of his "hero".

"Kobe Bryant was my HERO growing up. Even to this day he was an inspiration to the way I approached things," he wrote, adding: "His mentality motivated me not only in hard times but throughout my whole life. RIP, Kobe."

Footballer Raheem Sterling said: "Rest easy, legend."

Meanwhile, Neymar, who scored twice in Paris Saint-Germain's win over Lille on Sunday, dedicated his second goal to the Lakers legend.

Drew Brees spoke to ESPN from the Pro Bowl, saying of Bryant: "I had the chance to meet him one time. He was a guy I hoped to have the chance to be around more.

"I had so much respect for him as a competitor. I know he inspired so many people in so many different ways.

"He was one of the great competitors of any generation - not just with sports but the way he approached a lot of things with what he was doing now after basketball.

"I pray for him, I pray for his family. It's a tragic loss."

The fastest man that has ever lived is about to become a dad.

Double sprint world record holder Usain Bolt has offered words of encouragement for athletes preparing to take part in the 2020 Youth Olympics in Lausanne.

A total of 1783 athletes from 79 nations are expected to compete in some 81 events over the next month.  His native Jamaica will not be among them, with the Caribbean represented at the winter event by Haiti and Trinidad and Tobago.

The former sprinter took the time out to wish all the young competitors about to take part in the event good look and encouraged them to enjoy the experience as they reach for their dreams.

“That’s where I started, that’s where your future starts to take shape,” Bolt said via a video message.

So, go there and do your best and enjoy yourself.  That’s the key thing.  Enjoy the experience.  You’re this young.  Take your time develop and get great,” Bolt added.

The Jamaica speeders would know all about excelling at the youth level after claiming gold medals in the 200m, 4x100m and 4x400m relays at the 2002 World Junior Championship in Kingston and gold in the 200m at 2003 World Youth Championships in Sherbrooke.  Bolt went on to win a total of 20 Olympic and World Championship medals in a stellar career.

He left Cleveland for Miami, finally became a champion, went back to his beloved northeast Ohio, delivered on another title promise, then left for the Los Angeles Lakers and the next challenge. He played in eight straight finals. No NBA player won more games or more MVP awards over the last 10 years than he did. He started a school. He married his high school sweetheart.

"That's all?" LeBron James asked, feigning disbelief.

No, that's not all. Those were just some highlights of the last 10 years. There were many more, as the man called "King" spent the last decade reigning over all others — with no signs of slowing down.

 James is The Associated Press male athlete of the decade, adding his name to a list that includes Tiger Woods, Wayne Gretzky and Arnold Palmer. He was a runaway winner in a vote of AP member sports editors and AP beat writers, easily outpacing runner-up Tom Brady of the New England Patriots.

"You add another 10 years of learning and adversity, pitfalls, good, great, bad, and any smart person who wants to grow will learn from all those experiences," James, who turns 35 Monday, told the AP. "A decade ago, I just turned 25. I'm about to be 35 and I'm just in a better (place) in my life and have a better understanding of what I want to get out of life."

Usain Bolt of Jamaica was third for dominating the sprints at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, soccer superstar Lionel Messi was fourth and Michael Phelps — the U.S. swimmer who retired as history's most decorated Olympian with 28 medals, 23 gold — was fifth.

Former Jamaican sprinter and triple-double Olympic gold medallist, Usain Bolt, said he was heartened to see the kind of support that turned out for the inauguration of the National Stadium in Tokyo ahead of the Olympic games to be held there and what it meant for the 2020 showpiece multi-sport event.

Yohan Blake believes he could have had a better career had it not been for Usain Bolt. Do you believe the statements surrounding the issue smack of envy?

 Jamaican sprinter Yohan Blake believes he has suffered from competing in the same era as compatriot and athletics great Usain Bolt.

The 29-year-old Blake has recorded some stunning achievements of his own on the track, in a career that has also been hampered by injury.  His best times over the 100m (9.69) and 200m (19.26) are the second-fastest ever recorded over the distances.  Bolt still holds both world records.

In addition, Blake claimed the gold medal at the 2011 Daegu World Championship and silver medals in both the 100m and 200m at the 2012 London Olympic Games.  On both occasions, the sprinter finished behind his illustrious teammate Bolt.  Once thought as the natural successor to the athletics sprint throne, Blake then suffered major hamstring injuries in both the 2013 and 2014 seasons.  While insisting that he is satisfied with what he has achieved in the sport to date,  Blake believes things could have been different had he been born in another era.

"I would be the fastest man in everything. I feel like I was born in a wrong time. But nevertheless, I am happy with what I have achieved,” Blake told reporters recently.

“It would be hard to top Usain because it was his time and it was hard to compete against him. The first time I beat him in Kingston, I had to work day and night to do it."

Heading into the 2012 Olympics Blake defeated Bolt over both the 100m and 200m at the Jamaica National trials but never managed to repeat the feat.

If dreams come true, United States sprinter Noah Lyles could be the new 100m world record holder before even setting foot in the Tokyo Olympics final.

The 22-year-old American sprinter has been one of a handful of prominent stars to emerge from the pack as up and coming athletes chase the legacy of Jamaica sprint king Usain Bolt.  Despite being universally acknowledged as a tremendous talent and winning his first major title earlier this year, which was the 200m at the Doha World Championships, for now, Lyles remains firmly in the Jamaican's big shadow.

In addition to boasting eight Olympics and 11 World Championship gold medals, it is Bolt who still holds the records for the fastest times ever clocked over both the 100m (9.58) and 200m (19.19).  The American has already at least broken one of Bolt’s records in pursuit.  Earlier this year, the young sprinter broke Bolt’s meet record at the Paris Diamond League.  Lyles clocked 19.65, eclipsing the Jamaican's previous time of 19.73.  With the Olympics on the horizon, the American has much bigger hopes, well bigger dreams in any case.

“I’m very excited for Tokyo. Japan is one of my favourite countries outside the US. I’ve got big plans,” Lyles told Olympic.org.

“I’ve got a dream that I ran 9.41 in the semis at the Olympics,” he added.

The athlete must, of course, secure himself a spot on the United States national team before having a chance to chase his dream.

 

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