Sacked head coach of the Trinidad and Tobago men’s national team, Dennis Lawrence, will be replaced as early as next weekend to give the new boss time to help the side prepare for a two-legged CONCACAF Gold Cup playoff against either Guyana or Barbados.

The next FIFA match window is in March of 2020, giving the new coach just three months between the first acid test and turning the fortunes of the Soca Warriors around.

Trinidad and Tobago are in freefall at the moment, winning just one game in 2019 and currently lie at 104th in the world, just a few ranking places above its lowest all-time position.

A statement from the William Wallace-led Trinidad and Tobago Football Association on Sunday confirmed the sacking of the 45-year-old coach, who has been in charge of the national team since January 2017.

According to reports coming out of Trinidad and Tobago, the TTFA’s board had a nine-hour meeting Saturday at the Ato Boldon Stadium. It was at that meeting that the decision was taken to relieve the coach of his duties.

The TTFA’s statement said Lawrence’s representatives and the board will meet to determine the terms of his departure.

Under Lawrence, Trinidad played 31 matches. They won five, drew seven and lost 19 for a win percentage of 16.13 per cent.

In those matches, TT scored 36 goals while conceding 53.

Despite that poor record, Lawrence may be another in a long list of coaches to be owed significant amounts by the TTFA.

The coach had two years left on his contract and had delayed signing that contract until a performance clause for his sacking was removed.

The clause had said Lawrence had to maintain an annual success rate of 40 per cent while dropping no more than six points in the FIFA rankings.

Lawrence has overseen a 20-point drop in the rankings stemming from 795 days without winning a competitive game.

It is not yet known who the William Wallace-led Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) have been considering as replacement for Lawrence, but when the former T&T defender was given the job, Stephen Hart, Terry Fenwick and Stuart Charles-Fevrier were the names on the shortlist.

Hart recently said the job was not one he would consider under the circumstances that existed in Trinidad & Tobago.

Former Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president and Port of Spain Mayor, Raymond Tim Kee is dead.

The 71-year-old Tim Kee, passed on Sunday at his Flagstaff home after a long ailment, leaving the football fraternity in mourning.

TTFA President William Wallace issued condolences to the family, saying he had lost, not just a colleague in football, but a friend.

“He was a good human being who cared for his fellow men. As an administrator, he never micromanaged but instead allowed guided initiative. He had the game at heart and was one of those persons who hurt over the last couple years,” said Wallace in an interview with T&T website Wired868.

Wallace was the National Senior Team manager during Tim Kee’s term in office.

“I salute the memory of an exceptional man who I knew as a voice of reason. My heartfelt sympathy condolences to his entire family,” he said.

Wallace’s comments were made on the back of a TTFA statement, which also issued condolences, remembering Tim Kee as a kind-hearted man, ‘devoted and committed to serving his country the best way he could.’

Tim Kee took over presidency of the TTFA in 2012 after Jack Warner was forced to resign amidst a US investigation into corruption within FIFA that implicated him.

Tim Kee’s presidency saw a resurgence of the Soca Warriors but also an increasingly troubling financial situation. Constant squabbles with his board over those financial issues led to his eventual ousting in 2015 by recently deposed president, David John-Williams.

Trinidad and Tobago Super League president, Keith Look Loy, as well as Strike Squad captain Clayton Morris have also expressed their condolences.   

‘Thoroughly disappointed’ is how Trinidad and Tobago Pro League chairman Brent Sancho described the news that no team from the Pro League will take part in CONCACAF competition for the second season running.

 Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) board member Selby Brown has insisted the body must move quickly to address an avalanche of financial issues, which threatens to drag the association into insolvency.

Brown, who previously served as a first vice president under the David John-Williams administration, failed in his bid to get re-elected as second vice president’s position in Sunday’s elections, losing to United TTFA candidate Clynt Taylor.

With the association facing debts in the region of $US 7,108,608, in a large part due to a culmination of several lawsuits, Brown insisted that the new administration must hit the ground running.

“The delegates have spoken and that democracy must be respected, and I wish the United TTFA visionaries well. Most of those who served the previous regimes were the ones who incurred the huge debt of the TTFA of some $TT40 million and celebrated the added two judgments in the amount of $TT8.4 million last week. That does not include a further $TT15 million that Mr. Jack Warner claims is owed to him by the TTFA and confirmed by TTFA President Raymond Tim Kee in a letter dated November 2015,” Browne to insideworldfootball.

The former vice president insisted that as well as the administrative issue, there were issues to solve off the field as well.

“The vote by delegates for the United TTFA is No problem. They all intend to get billions from NIKE. Did they ask themselves the question: Why would a brand associate itself with a team that lost 14 out of 15 games?  What exactly is the benefit to the brand? Unless the United TTFA plans to provide Nike with a new slogan; ‘Wear NIKE and Lose’,” he continued.

“I look forward to the TTFA urgently receiving the promised Nike sponsorship millions to avoid the TTFA from being declared bankrupt or avoiding insolvency.”

William Wallace is the new president of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) after he unseated controversial former boss, David John-Williams in an election at the weekend. The question is, what next?

Former head coach of Trinidad and Tobago’s Senior team Stephen Hart is coy on whether he would coach that country’s team again if there was a change of administration in the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation on Sunday.

Former Trinidad and Tobago coach Stephen Hart said he was happy with Tuesday’s High Court TT$5million ruling because he felt cheated by the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association, who fired him from his head coaching job after three and half years in charge and at a critical stage of the 2018 World Cup campaign.

The TTFA fired Hart in November 2016 during the Hexagonal Round of the 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign after the national team suffered consecutive losses to Costa Rica and Honduras.

Many, including Hart, saw the dismissal as unjust given that the head coach had led the team to knockout stages of the 2013 campaign and 2015 Gold Cup competitions. TT topped their Gold Cup group in 2015.

 During his 43-match tenure in charge of TT Hart had a record of 16 wins, 12 draws and 15 losses.

 He sued the TTFA citing wrongful dismissal a claim that the association did not contest. On Tuesday, Justice Eleanor Donaldson-Honeywell, in a default judgement ordered the TTFA to pay the Canada-based coach $5million (approximately USD$739,000).

 “Obviously, I am pleased with the court ruling. It was, in my view, so unnecessary, mainly because I thought that at least I should have been given the opportunity to finish what we started. My staff and myself had worked very hard to bring the team to a certain point; we were already in the Hex, and of course, we were not allowed to do so,” Hart told Sportsmax.TV on Friday from his home in Canada, where he now serves as General Manager of HFX Wanderers in the Canadian Premier League.

 “Winning a judgment is one thing and collecting is something else completely, but really and truly it was not about the money, it was about doing a job for Trinidad and Tobago football, trying to bring some joy back to the game and the people who love the game and I just felt a little bit cheated out of that.”

Former CONCACAF president Jack Warner has launched legal proceedings against the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) in relation to loans incurred during the period he served as advisor to the association.

According to reports, Warner is suing the football body with the hope of recovering a sum somewhere in the region of US$2.4m.  Based on filings, Warner claims the sum was accrued over the course of 15 years.

The loans are believed to be directly related to the TTFA’s expenses during a period that spanned the national team’s successful qualification to the 2006 World Cup.  Warner’s legal claim states that the TTFA has always acknowledged the debts but never repaid them.

 “These accounts were published after the date of both letters from president Raymond Tim Kee, who had on two separate occasions acknowledged the debt to the claimant…At no time did the claimant inform the defendant that they were no longer under an obligation to repay the debt.”

Warner is seeking repayment of the aforementioned US$2.4m plus interest.  The former FIFA official was recently at the centre of a lawsuit filed in New York court on behalf of regional football body CONCACAF.  On that occasion, the judge ruled that the former official pay a US$79 million penalty stemming from the FIFA bribery scandal.

Former FIFA vice-president Jack Warner has hailed ‘building people’ and not buildings as an enduring aspect of his legacy.

Camps, the longest-serving president in the history of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) formerly the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFA), died last week after taking ill during the festive season.

The 87-year-old led the football body between 1992 and 2012, previously managing the 1973 TT team that infamously lost 2-1 to hosts Haiti in the CONCACAF qualifiers, for the 1974 FIFA World Cup in West Germany, and the Strike Squad team that narrowly missed qualification to the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy.

“What he did was to build character, to build people,” Warner said at a funeral service for the former official.

“His legacy was to build people. That is why in the era of Ollie Camps there were so many players having overseas contracts, unlike today,” he added.

Warner expressed his condolences to Camps’ family, including his companion Farida Sanchez and daughter Sandra. Sandra and her cousin Elizabeth Camps delivered the eulogy at the funeral service.

Former FIFA vice president and local football head Jack Warner has lambasted the standard of the Trinidad and Tobago Pro League.

In a wide-ranging interview, which spoke to the overall state of football in the twin-island republic, Warner pointed to the level of play in local football league as a primary concern.  The league has often been plunged into chaos in recent years with players and clubs threatening to take strike action over unpaid wages.

As it stands, the league is heavily reliant on Government subvention and corporate support but it seems Warner is unconvinced of its benefits.

“You can’t expect to be asking how much you going to pay me and you can’t trap a ball, you can’t pass a ball,” Warner told T&T based news source CCN TV6.

“Right now the only thing professional about the T&T Pro League is the name pro.  There’s nothing professional about it.  Who today would pay a dollar to see a player play in the Pro League,” he added.

“Name for me five players in the Pro League who have substance.”

The former football administrator who is currently fighting extradition to the United States relating to corruption charges during his tenure as a FIFA Vice president.

Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president David John Williams has staunchly defended the controversial Home of Football project at Couva as a necessity for the sport in the twin-island republic.

The multi-million-dollar project, which officially began in September of last year.  The facility was built on 7.64 hectors of land leased to the TTFA.  The project has, however, drawn criticism for both its overall cost and implementation.  Some have argued that the funds could be better spent with the association already heavily in debt.  In an exclusive interview with the SportsMax Zone, John-Williams, however, defended the project.

“The most important investment you can make is a roof over your head,” John Williams told the SportsMax Zone.

“The house is very important for a family,” he added.

“What this administration is achieving is a necessity.  Before we never owned a parrot on a stick.  If it’s this association that achieves it then so be it.”

A US$2.5 million (TT$16.85 million) grant was given to the TT Football Association to build the facility, which will include a hotel, an entertainment centre and training grounds.

Former Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president Oliver Camps has passed away at the age of 87.

 Camps, who was the longest-serving president of the association, died at the St Clair Medical Centre in Port of Spain on Tuesday, after being admitted late last year.

The former TTFA boss served the association for 20 years, between 1992 and 2012 before retiring in somewhat controversial circumstances.  During Camps’ tenure, Trinidad and Tobago qualified for the FIFA 2006 World Cup in Germany as well as the 2007 Under-17 and 2009 Under-20 World Youth Cups in the Republic of Korea and Egypt respectively.

In addition, the former official was involved in two other moments of near-historic significance for T&T.  Camps was team manager when Trinidad and Tobago were controversially denied a spot in the West Germany 1974 World Cup, after dubious officiating saw T&T,inspired by Everald Cummings, Steve David and Warren Archibald, fall 2-1 to Haiti.

He was the manager again in 1989 when the ‘Strike Squad’, then coached by Cummings and featuring the likes of Russell Latapy, Dwight Yorke and Clayton Morris lost 1-0 to the USA in Port of Spain, when a draw would have secured them a place at the 1990 World Cup in Italy.

The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) has paid its national players four of six outstanding amounts for which there was the promise of strike action. 

Trinidad and Tobago Football Association vice president Ewing Davis has blamed several of the association’s current legal woes on the previous administration.

The TTFA has found itself in a financial bind in recent times having been hit with several high-profile lawsuits.  Most recently, the association was ordered to pay US$ 70,188.79 (TT$475,743) in unpaid match fees, salaries and per diems to the Futsal team, which took part in the 2016 CONCACAF Futsal Championship.  However, on the horizon are also non-payment lawsuits from Stephen Hart, Carolina Morace (both former coaches), Anton Corneal and Sheldon Walkes (present and past technical directors).

The TFFA is also reportedly in arrears with the current crop of players, who have according to reports, not been paid since October of last year.

"Lots of things that are coming to us are things that happened with Raymond Tim Kee. Mr Tim Kee made promises to people and did not deliver,” Davis told the Trinidad and Tobago Newsday.

“However, David is in office and if this is football, then fine, but I cannot say that this could have been avoided. I don't think Raymond had spoken to us about the commitments he had to anybody,” he added.

The official also claimed to be unaware of the plight of the current crop of players, who have claimed to be unable to get a suitable response from the association.

"I am not aware, so I cannot respond to that."

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