Retired Jamaica sprint legend Usain Bolt admits to missing the sport of athletics and once mulled the idea of coming out of retirement but was convinced he had made the right decision by his former coach Glen Mills.

Bolt, considered in many arenas as the greatest sprinter of all time, amassed stellar achievements in a career that lasted well over a decade.  In addition to holding the world record over both the 100m and 200m sprints, the Jamaican claimed 8 Olympic gold and 11 World Championship medals.

His soaring career might, however, be said to have ended on somewhat of a low after finishing third at the 2017 World Championships and failing to finish in the 4x100m relay. 

 "I talked to my track coach," Bolt told CNN Sport's Coy Wire. "And he was like, 'No, you're not doing it. People that retire and come back -- it doesn't always work out.'

The sprinter, who suffers from scoliosis of the spine, was quick to admit that he also did not miss the grueling training needed to compete at the highest level.

"For me, at the end I knew it was time because the drive wasn't there. But every time I watch track and field I miss it. And every time I go to the track to see my coach and I watch him training I go, 'Did I make the right decision?' ... But every time I train with them I think, 'Ah yeah I made the right decision. I don't miss this.'"

 Reigning world record holder and soon to be dad Usain Bolt insists he would not encourage his children to follow in his footsteps.

The Jamaican sprint king, who retired from the sport in 2016, is considered one of the greatest athletes of all time.  News of the track star about to father a child perhaps for many conjured images of someday having the next generation of the Bolt family continuing his rich legacy.  Not, however, if the sprinter can help it.

“I’m going to say no, initially.  If they do, I will support it,” Bolt said in an interview with The Times.

“I think the pressure is going to be too much, especially at the level I left it. It’s going to be tough to follow,” he added.

Matching the feats of Bolt would indeed take some doing.  The athlete dominated the sport of track and field for over a decade, winning 8 Olympic gold medals and 11 World Championships.

“You have to wait until they get to a certain age to explain to them that people are going to expect a lot from you, because of what I’ve done in the past.  I’ll wait until the time is right to explain.”

If dreams come true, United States sprinter Noah Lyles could be the new 100m world record holder before even setting foot in the Tokyo Olympics final.

The 22-year-old American sprinter has been one of a handful of prominent stars to emerge from the pack as up and coming athletes chase the legacy of Jamaica sprint king Usain Bolt.  Despite being universally acknowledged as a tremendous talent and winning his first major title earlier this year, which was the 200m at the Doha World Championships, for now, Lyles remains firmly in the Jamaican's big shadow.

In addition to boasting eight Olympics and 11 World Championship gold medals, it is Bolt who still holds the records for the fastest times ever clocked over both the 100m (9.58) and 200m (19.19).  The American has already at least broken one of Bolt’s records in pursuit.  Earlier this year, the young sprinter broke Bolt’s meet record at the Paris Diamond League.  Lyles clocked 19.65, eclipsing the Jamaican's previous time of 19.73.  With the Olympics on the horizon, the American has much bigger hopes, well bigger dreams in any case.

“I’m very excited for Tokyo. Japan is one of my favourite countries outside the US. I’ve got big plans,” Lyles told Olympic.org.

“I’ve got a dream that I ran 9.41 in the semis at the Olympics,” he added.

The athlete must, of course, secure himself a spot on the United States national team before having a chance to chase his dream.

 

After spending a good chunk of their careers as fierce competitors, decorated US track star Allyson Felix never dreamed she would find an ally and close friend in Jamaican counterpart Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. 

Now, united by the unforgettable journey of motherhood, the two are joined as participants in an experience that will live long after their final races on the track have been run. 

On the track, most of the duels between the sprinters came as part of a fierce match-up that pit the United States against Jamaica in the 4x100m relays for almost a decade, coming face to face in 2011 (Daegu), 2012 (London) 2015 (Beijing) and 2016 (Rio).

Off the mondo track battleground, however, the two have learned to be teammates of sorts in a cause that spreads well beyond its neatly lined white borders.

 In March 2017, Fraser-Pryce took time away from the sport to give birth to her first child a boy named Zyon.  One year later it was Felix’s turn to collect the baton, giving birth to her daughter Camryn.  The arduous journey is one rarely undertaken by female athletes at the top of their game, perhaps for fear of unknown changes to bodies primed for elite competition.  For the legendary sprinters, however, the long climb back to the top of the winner’s podium has proven not just a source of unity but they hope a rallying cry for women in competitive sport.

"It’s been interesting, because we’ve been competitors for so long," Felix told AOL.com

It’s just life that changes you at some point and both of us becoming mothers really brought us together," Felix said of embracing the challenge motherhood alongside Fraser-Pryce.

"Whereas before, not that it wasn’t a friendly competition, but we wouldn’t really mix too much, but now we have something that brings us together, that we share in common and that gives us something to talk about,” she added.

"We’ve really been encouraging each other, and she’s been a great source of help along the way to bounce things off of and vice versa. It’s something that I never really imagined in a competitor, but it’s really cool," she went on. "To be able to support other women, at least in my sport, I didn’t feel that when I first came in. I wanted to change that culture. Let’s celebrate one another, and let's encourage one another!"

Fraser-Pryce returned to the top of world sprinting in spectacular fashion this year after claiming a fourth 100m title at the Doha World Championships.  Felix will hope to follow suit when she bids for an appearance at next year’s Olympic Games.

Retired Jamaica sprint superstar Usain Bolt has insisted he was never worried about rising United States track star Noah Lyles eclipsing his 200m world record at the Doha World Championships.

The 22-year-old American had a stellar season, even breaking Bolt’s meet record at the Paris Diamond League meet.  On the back of several strong performances to claim the US 200m national title, including an effortless win at the US national trials, speculation grew that Lyles would go after the world’s best mark of 19.19 set in 2009.

In the end, Lyles was triumphant and claimed the 200m title in 19.83, while more than good enough for gold, the time was slower than some expected.

“I knew he wasn’t going to get it. It’s not easy. A lot of people see it and feel like you show up and you just run fast,” Bolt told NBC Sports Olympic Talk.

“For me, throughout the season, I figured out what I needed to do. I didn’t run races because I wanted to run fast. I ran races to figure out how I needed to run the corner, my technique I needed to fix. If you followed me through my career, I didn’t run a lot throughout the season. I trained. I ran and competed, figured out what I needed to improve, then did that [repeated that process] over again. That’s what I did to perfect my race [for the championships].”

 

Decorated Jamaican sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce sounded a warning to her rivals after registering an impressive season's best and meet record to claim the women’s 100m title at the Racers Grand Prix meet, in Kingston, on Saturday.

In trademark style, the pocket rocket, as she is commonly known, blasted away from the field before stopping the clock at 10.88.  Fraser-Pryce led wire-to-wire and finished a third of a second ahead of second place Jonielle Smith and Michelle-Lee Ayhe who both clocked 11.20.

The win was the third in a row at the meet for the diminutive Jamaican but more importantly, she believed the result puts her in good shape ahead of the country’s national trials.

“This is my third victory here and honestly I’m happy with the time of 10.88 as I’ve always wanted to lower the meet record to under 11 seconds,” said Fraser-Pryce. “I couldn’t have asked for more and I’m really looking forward to the national trials in two weeks.”

In the men’s equivalent, Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes just about covered the field to win the men’s 100m in a season’s best of 9.97 (0.9m/s) ahead of Yohan Blake 10.01 and Kendal Williams 10.13.

Former 100m world record holder Asafa Powell is expected to return to the track later this month after reportedly being booked for an appearance at the Meeting de Paris.

The January 27th indoor meet is listed and Indoor Permit Meeting.  The 36-year-old Powell, a World Championship silver medallist, could be back on track for the first since 2018 when a groin injury ended his season.  Injuries have been a big issue for the former sprint king in recent years as prior to that he suffered a hamstring injury, which kept him out of last year’s Commonwealth Games.

Powell is scheduled to line up in the 60m sprint alongside European Indoor champion Richard Kilty of Great Britain.  Adding to a competitive field will be American Mike Rodgers and Cuban star Yunier Perez, who is returning from injury, are also down to face the starter.  The French contingent of home town heroes will be led by Renaud Lavillenie, Kevin Mayer and Pascal Martinot-Lagarde.

Jamaican sprinter Andre Ewers destroyed the field to claim top spot in the men’s 200 dash at the Orange and Purple Elite meet on Friday.

The Jamaican powered to the line to stop the clock at 20.94, well clear second place compatriot and former Calabar High School standout Jermaine Brown who was second in 21.37.  Shannon Patterson was third in 21.41.  The mark was not only an early NCCA but world lead.

The start is a good one for the sprinter who was named to the prestigious Bowerman preseason watch list.  The Bowerman is collegiate track & field’s highest honour and has been awarded annually by the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association (USTFCCCA) since 2009.

Ewers finished the year ranked No. 7 in the world with outdoor season-bests of 9.98 in the 100-metre dash and 20.28 in the 200m.

 

Jamaica Olympic 100m hurdler Dionne Rose Henley is gravely ill after reportedly battling late-stage cancer.

Rose-Henley, who celebrated her 49th birthday last month, remains hospitalised in serious condition.

As part of a crop of trailblazing female hurdlers, which included the likes of Delloreen Ennis-London, Vonette Dixon and Gillian Russell, Rose Henley represented Jamaica at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona where she made the semi-finals, before reaching the final four years later in Atlanta.  The hurdler placed fifth in that final.

Rose Henley, a two-time national champion then went on to represent the country at the 1995, 1997, 1999 and 2001 World Championships and twice claimed gold at the CAC Games.  The athlete was part of a one-two finish ahead of Russell at the 1998 Games in Venezuela, before claiming the title again in El Salvador 2002.

After retiring from the sport, Rose Henley took up coaching at her alma mater Middle Tennessee State University for two seasons before moving to Tennessee State University.  She then journeyed to Central Michigan where she spent seven years.  Last summer Rose Henley was named Coastal Carolina assistant track and field coach, where she focused on the sprints, hurdles and relays.

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