After a season battling injuries in 2019, Nathon Allen seems to be on the mend and relishing the feeling.

Retired Jamaican sprint king, Usain Bolt, must have had a nervous moment, or two, when American Noah Lyes was recorded crossing the line in 18.90, in a 200m sprint, during the socially distanced Inspiration Games earlier this week.

It turns out, however, in a massive error, that the athlete had only run 185 metres after starting from the wrong spot.  The novel competition saw 28 athletes split into three teams, taking part in eight events, at seven different venues. 

Competitors were connected by a live video and timing link with a split-screen.  Lyles represented Team North America, and convincingly beat Team Europe's Christophe Lemaitre, in Zurich, and Team World's Churandy Martina, in Papendal.  The organisers at the Bradenton, Florida track while Lyles ran, however, didn’t get things quite right and he was later disqualified.

In a recent interview with Variety, Bolt, who will be featured in the upcoming Greatness Code Apple series, admitted that these days he was more focused on being a good dad.  He, however, still enjoys watching track and field but stays clear of any thoughts of picking his successor.  Bolt previously picked compatriot Yohan Blake and South African Wayde Van Niekerk to replace him as the new king of sprinting.  While Blake is yet to recover the type of form that saw him crowned the world’s second-fastest man, van Niekerk broke the 400m world record but then suffered a serious injury.

“For me, I’m just watching.  I think I tend to have bad luck in picking people.  When I say I like this person at times it doesn’t work out,” Bolt said.

Bolt's records of 9.58, over 100m, and 19.19, in the 200m, are now 11 years old.

A number of World Champions from the 2019 World Championships in Doha are reportedly being lined up for the Jamaica International Invitational set for May 2, 2020.

If dreams come true, United States sprinter Noah Lyles could be the new 100m world record holder before even setting foot in the Tokyo Olympics final.

The 22-year-old American sprinter has been one of a handful of prominent stars to emerge from the pack as up and coming athletes chase the legacy of Jamaica sprint king Usain Bolt.  Despite being universally acknowledged as a tremendous talent and winning his first major title earlier this year, which was the 200m at the Doha World Championships, for now, Lyles remains firmly in the Jamaican's big shadow.

In addition to boasting eight Olympics and 11 World Championship gold medals, it is Bolt who still holds the records for the fastest times ever clocked over both the 100m (9.58) and 200m (19.19).  The American has already at least broken one of Bolt’s records in pursuit.  Earlier this year, the young sprinter broke Bolt’s meet record at the Paris Diamond League.  Lyles clocked 19.65, eclipsing the Jamaican's previous time of 19.73.  With the Olympics on the horizon, the American has much bigger hopes, well bigger dreams in any case.

“I’m very excited for Tokyo. Japan is one of my favourite countries outside the US. I’ve got big plans,” Lyles told Olympic.org.

“I’ve got a dream that I ran 9.41 in the semis at the Olympics,” he added.

The athlete must, of course, secure himself a spot on the United States national team before having a chance to chase his dream.

 

Retired Jamaica sprint superstar Usain Bolt has insisted he was never worried about rising United States track star Noah Lyles eclipsing his 200m world record at the Doha World Championships.

The 22-year-old American had a stellar season, even breaking Bolt’s meet record at the Paris Diamond League meet.  On the back of several strong performances to claim the US 200m national title, including an effortless win at the US national trials, speculation grew that Lyles would go after the world’s best mark of 19.19 set in 2009.

In the end, Lyles was triumphant and claimed the 200m title in 19.83, while more than good enough for gold, the time was slower than some expected.

“I knew he wasn’t going to get it. It’s not easy. A lot of people see it and feel like you show up and you just run fast,” Bolt told NBC Sports Olympic Talk.

“For me, throughout the season, I figured out what I needed to do. I didn’t run races because I wanted to run fast. I ran races to figure out how I needed to run the corner, my technique I needed to fix. If you followed me through my career, I didn’t run a lot throughout the season. I trained. I ran and competed, figured out what I needed to improve, then did that [repeated that process] over again. That’s what I did to perfect my race [for the championships].”

 

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