If dreams come true, United States sprinter Noah Lyles could be the new 100m world record holder before even setting foot in the Tokyo Olympics final.

The 22-year-old American sprinter has been one of a handful of prominent stars to emerge from the pack as up and coming athletes chase the legacy of Jamaica sprint king Usain Bolt.  Despite being universally acknowledged as a tremendous talent and winning his first major title earlier this year, which was the 200m at the Doha World Championships, for now, Lyles remains firmly in the Jamaican's big shadow.

In addition to boasting eight Olympics and 11 World Championship gold medals, it is Bolt who still holds the records for the fastest times ever clocked over both the 100m (9.58) and 200m (19.19).  The American has already at least broken one of Bolt’s records in pursuit.  Earlier this year, the young sprinter broke Bolt’s meet record at the Paris Diamond League.  Lyles clocked 19.65, eclipsing the Jamaican's previous time of 19.73.  With the Olympics on the horizon, the American has much bigger hopes, well bigger dreams in any case.

“I’m very excited for Tokyo. Japan is one of my favourite countries outside the US. I’ve got big plans,” Lyles told Olympic.org.

“I’ve got a dream that I ran 9.41 in the semis at the Olympics,” he added.

The athlete must, of course, secure himself a spot on the United States national team before having a chance to chase his dream.

 

Jamaica’s Reggae Boyz cruised to a 2-0 win over Antigua and Barbuda in the CONCACAF Nations League at the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium, in St John’s, Antigua and Barbuda on Friday.

In the lively Group C fixture, it was the visiting Jamaicans who looked the more menacing team early on but were plagued by inaccurate passes and poor finishing in the final third.  Despite being good value for a lead, when they did take one in the 34th minute it was somewhat fortuitously.  Maalique Foster emerged from a thicket of players to knock the ball into an unguarded net after Antigua goalkeeper Molvin James had spilled an Alvas Powell shot from a tough angle.

The Jamaicans continued to enjoy dominance in possession, but the hosts also put positive spell together, despite lacking a cutting edge in the final third. 

The Reggae Boyz doubled their lead in the 58th minute after Ricardo Morris slammed the ball high into the roof of the net after being played through from a well-weighted Shamar Nicholson pass.  The Benna Boys threatened to at least get a consolation goal late on but D’Andre Bishop saw his 82nd minute shot charged down by the Jamaica backline.

The win saw Jamaica extended their lead to a perfect 15 points with 5 matches played in the group and secured their spot to the 2021 Concacaf Gold Cup.

 

 

Defending champion Justin Burrowes will compete in this weekend's 24th staging of the Alliance Buccaneer Memorial Golf Tournament at the Caymanas Golf Club in St. Catherine.  

Jamaica’s Reggae Boyz have reportedly settled into a new hotel in Antigua following the embarrassing scenario on Monday when the team was met by deplorable conditions at the Starfish Halcyon Cove Resort.

Asafa Powell, the former 100-metre world record holder and current Guinness Record holder for the most sub-10 runs has launched asafafitlife.com, a fitness membership platform to help people around the world take control of their health and meet their fitness goals, with hands-on guidance on workouts and nutrition.

“Health is our greatest asset,” Powell said. “Having over a decade of dedicated workout and nutrition experience as an athlete I felt it was time to share that.”

The services offered on the site include but not limited to a 12-week fitness plan, nutrition advice, as well as recipes and fitness videos. Having done a soft launch to get feedback and fine-tune the site, the response has positive.

It has given persons the opportunity to start their fitness journey with someone they trust, can relate to and know that the support they need is at their fingertips.

“I wanted to create a community,” Powell said.

Once people sign up, they get access to a range of his e-books like 'Live Like a Legend', a 30-Day guide to help people kick-start their journey to fitness. There is also access to a private group on Facebook that members can join to share their progress, provide support, share recipe ideas and keep in touch with Powell as they embark on their fitness journey.

The site also features more than 50 fitness videos providing detailed workout instructions for beginners as well as expert advice on how to exercise safely and effectively as well as Powell’s Nutrition Mission eBook.

To learn more about Asafa’s fitness membership platform and to see why it’s poised to change the game visit https://asafafitlife.com.

There has been a significant backlash against the IAAF’s decision to cut eight events – four male and four female – from the Diamond League circuit for the upcoming season.

Jamaica centre Samardo Samuels has admitted he was grateful to join Greek Club Panionios BC after facing the very real prospect of the end of his basketball career.

The 30-year-old big man joined the Greek Basketball League (GBL) last month, only weeks after taking part in the United States Big Three League.  The player has been dogged by controversy in recent times after changing four clubs in the last two years due to a clutter of disciplinary issues.

"I was at home… I was at home and no one wanted me and this opportunity came up. Everyone told me to stop, everyone told me it was time to do something else. Coming here and winning the first match was really a thrill for me. I arrived with a positive mood, I had a smile all the time. Everyone welcomed me and it had an impact on the way we fought during these games,” Samuels told basketball Europe.

The Jamaican enjoyed a solid start to his season after staring in wins over Rethymnon and Iraklis.  Samuels averaged 21 points and 7.5 rebounds.

 "I will tell you a story. In the summer, I saw Kevin Durant. We have known each other since we were young. And when he saw me, he asked me if I was still playing basketball! He was surprised when I said yes.”

Retired Jamaican cricketer Renford Pinnock had plans to take graduation pictures of his youngest son, Phillip, who was graduating from the University of the West Indies (UWI) Friday with a Master’s degree in Education.

Ronald Levy, Jamaica’s reigning 110m hurdles champion and the 2018 Commonwealth Games champion had surgery to repair a fractured shin that has hampered him for more than a year.

The Vince Lombardi Trophy will make a historic first appearance in Jamaica on Saturday, November 2.

After spending a good chunk of their careers as fierce competitors, decorated US track star Allyson Felix never dreamed she would find an ally and close friend in Jamaican counterpart Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. 

Now, united by the unforgettable journey of motherhood, the two are joined as participants in an experience that will live long after their final races on the track have been run. 

On the track, most of the duels between the sprinters came as part of a fierce match-up that pit the United States against Jamaica in the 4x100m relays for almost a decade, coming face to face in 2011 (Daegu), 2012 (London) 2015 (Beijing) and 2016 (Rio).

Off the mondo track battleground, however, the two have learned to be teammates of sorts in a cause that spreads well beyond its neatly lined white borders.

 In March 2017, Fraser-Pryce took time away from the sport to give birth to her first child a boy named Zyon.  One year later it was Felix’s turn to collect the baton, giving birth to her daughter Camryn.  The arduous journey is one rarely undertaken by female athletes at the top of their game, perhaps for fear of unknown changes to bodies primed for elite competition.  For the legendary sprinters, however, the long climb back to the top of the winner’s podium has proven not just a source of unity but they hope a rallying cry for women in competitive sport.

"It’s been interesting, because we’ve been competitors for so long," Felix told AOL.com

It’s just life that changes you at some point and both of us becoming mothers really brought us together," Felix said of embracing the challenge motherhood alongside Fraser-Pryce.

"Whereas before, not that it wasn’t a friendly competition, but we wouldn’t really mix too much, but now we have something that brings us together, that we share in common and that gives us something to talk about,” she added.

"We’ve really been encouraging each other, and she’s been a great source of help along the way to bounce things off of and vice versa. It’s something that I never really imagined in a competitor, but it’s really cool," she went on. "To be able to support other women, at least in my sport, I didn’t feel that when I first came in. I wanted to change that culture. Let’s celebrate one another, and let's encourage one another!"

Fraser-Pryce returned to the top of world sprinting in spectacular fashion this year after claiming a fourth 100m title at the Doha World Championships.  Felix will hope to follow suit when she bids for an appearance at next year’s Olympic Games.

Retired Jamaica sprint superstar Usain Bolt has insisted he was never worried about rising United States track star Noah Lyles eclipsing his 200m world record at the Doha World Championships.

The 22-year-old American had a stellar season, even breaking Bolt’s meet record at the Paris Diamond League meet.  On the back of several strong performances to claim the US 200m national title, including an effortless win at the US national trials, speculation grew that Lyles would go after the world’s best mark of 19.19 set in 2009.

In the end, Lyles was triumphant and claimed the 200m title in 19.83, while more than good enough for gold, the time was slower than some expected.

“I knew he wasn’t going to get it. It’s not easy. A lot of people see it and feel like you show up and you just run fast,” Bolt told NBC Sports Olympic Talk.

“For me, throughout the season, I figured out what I needed to do. I didn’t run races because I wanted to run fast. I ran races to figure out how I needed to run the corner, my technique I needed to fix. If you followed me through my career, I didn’t run a lot throughout the season. I trained. I ran and competed, figured out what I needed to improve, then did that [repeated that process] over again. That’s what I did to perfect my race [for the championships].”

 

Track & Field News, widely recognized as the bible of the sport, has named Jamaica’s Briana Williams as the 2019 High School Girls Athlete of the Year.

Jamaica’s discarded Sunshine Girls said they feel disrespected by Netball Jamaica over the decision not to select them from an upcoming quadrangular series to take place in England in January 2020.

The Jamaica Administrative Athletics Association (JAAA) president Dr Warren Blake is now in full support of a government to government agreement with Kenya to exchange technical expertise in track and field.

Kenya, long known as giants of middle and long-distance running, has agreed to help Jamaica in that area of the track, an area they have had little to no impact. Jamaica, though, have been masters of sprinting, making an impact where a tiny nation probably wouldn’t be expected to. There, Jamaica has promised to help Kenya, who have recently begun to produce sprinters of fair talent, but have yet to grab real success at the global stage.

According to Blake, the Jamaican government and the JAAA are on the same page, despite the fact that they did not liaise on the initial agreement.

“Even though we were not included in the initial process, it is part of the thing that we are trying to do, which is broaden the scope of Jamaican track and field as that is the only way we are going to stay on top for the long term,” Blake said. “Veronica Campbell-Brown’s statue will be unveiled on Sunday at the Stadium, so I am hoping I get a chance to raise it with her (Sports Minister Olivia Grange). If not, next week I will to do that,” he said.

“We haven’t excelled in distance running. We have had occasional athletes who have performed reasonably in the area like Kemoy Campbell, Aisha Praught[-Leer] and Natoya Goule, but we are not consistent in putting out middle- and long-distance runners.”

According to Blake, the process must not be rushed and it will take time for Jamaica to get a foothold into middle and long-distance sprinting.

Blake explained that this project was attempted in 2012 but with little to no success and asked for patience this time around if the exchange was to bare fruit.

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