FIFA is considering staging the Women's World Cup every two years, according to the governing body's president Gianni Infantino.

The tournament is played every four years in its current guise and was most recently won by the United States in July.

Following the success of this year's edition in France, French Football Federation president Noel Le Graet suggested playing the competition biennially, rather than every four years.

And Infantino is not ruling out the prospect of staging the tournament more regularly in the future.

"[Le Graet] said we should organise the Women's World Cup every two years instead of every four years because it has such a big and positive impact on the women's game," Infantino told Sky Sports News.

"This is something we need to consider and we are considering it. There are a lot of exciting points with regards to women's football in the next few years."

Brazil, Colombia and Japan are all in contention to host the 2023 Women's World Cup, while Australia and New Zealand have submitted a joint-bid.

Kristine Lilly has backed the work done by Megan Rapinoe and her United States colleagues in building the profile of women’s sport.

Rapinoe is coming to the end of a stunning year in which she played a major role in the US winning the World Cup while also landing two major individual prizes in the FIFA Best and Ballon d’Or.

But it is her outspoken nature off the pitch that has arguably accelerated her rise to global prominence.

A vocal supporter of women’s rights and equal pay – as well as taking on US president Donald Trump in a Twitter spat - Rapinoe has become an icon for many around the world.

Former US midfielder Lilly, who holds the record for most international appearances by a male or female footballer with 352, was impressed with the way Rapinoe and her team-mates conducted themselves during the World Cup in France over the summer as well as their general outlook.

Asked about Rapinoe's influence, Lilly told Omnisport: "They have a platform, they are fighting for women’s sport, women’s football to make it a better environment and it’s being heard.

"It’s helping other countries to recognise that the investment is needed.

"The US team did a great job, the last World Cup was pretty phenomenal for what they accomplished. I’m proud of what they continue to fight for."

The World Cup in France elevated the profile of women’s football to new levels and Lilly is hopeful that momentum will continue.

She added: "There’s no other way to go. The investment that FIFA is putting behind the women’s game is the catalyst for it because of the recognition of where we are and where we need to go.

"The more teams we create, build that base up for competition, the better the World Cup will be.

"They are going to expand to 32 teams so we will need those teams to have some finance behind them. I see great things for the future of the women’s game. We have to keep backing it."

Brazil, Colombia and Japan will rival Australia and New Zealand for the right to host the 2023 Women's World Cup.

A joint bid from Football Federation Australia (FFA) and New Zealand Football (NZF) for the first 32-team edition of the competition was announced in Melbourne earlier on Friday.

FIFA has now confirmed that the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), Colombian Football Federation (FCF) and Japan Football Association (JFA) all submitted bids prior to the December 13 deadline.

A proposed joint bid from North and South Korea was not included in the final shortlist, with the Korea Football Association (KFA) having withdrawn their application, citing diplomatic tension between the two countries.

An assessment of the bids will now follow, which includes inspection visits to each member association, likely in January and February of next year.

The eligible bids will then be presented to the FIFA Council, which will select the host at a meeting in Addis Ababa in June 2020.

"France 2019 was certainly a watershed moment for women's football, and now it is FIFA's responsibility to take concrete measures to keep fostering the game's incredible growth," said FIFA president Gianni Infantino.

"With the FIFA Women's World Cup generating an unprecedented interest across member associations, we are ensuring that the process to select the hosts is seamless, objective, ethical and transparent.

"By the time the FIFA Council announces the hosts, there should be no doubt whatsoever as to why that choice was made."

The United States won the 2019 World Cup, beating Netherlands 2-0 in the final in Lyon to defend the trophy they claimed in 2015.

Megan Rapinoe has added another award to her collection after the United States star beat Lucy Bronze and Alex Morgan to win the Ballon d'Or Feminin.

The 34-year-old became a World Cup winner for the second time in July, claiming both the Golden Ball and the Golden Boot in France as her six goals helped Jill Ellis' team retain their trophy.

That led to Rapinoe being named The Best FIFA Women's Player in September and she has now succeeded Ada Hegerberg by winning the second ever Ballon d'Or Feminin.

England and Lyon right-back Bronze finished second in the voting while Rapinoe's USA team-mate Morgan was third.

Rapinoe was not at the ceremony in Paris on Monday, but said she was shocked to be the winning the award.

"It's a bummer [not to be there]," she said.

"I congratulate all the nominees. I can't believe I'm the one winning it.

"I want to thank my team-mates, my coaches, my federation, to allow me to be the person who I am on the field and off the field.

"Thank you to my beautiful girlfriend Sue. I'm so sorry I can't be there, I know it's going to be insane but I'll do my best to get there next year."

Megan Rapinoe has added another award to her collection after the United States star beat Lucy Bronze and Alex Morgan to win the Ballon d'Or Feminin.

The 34-year-old became a World Cup winner for the second time in July, claiming both the Golden Ball and the Golden Boot in France as her six goals helped Jill Ellis' team retain their trophy.

That led to Rapinoe being named The Best FIFA Women's Player in September and she has now succeeded Ada Hegerberg by winning the second ever Ballon d'Or Feminin.

England and Lyon right-back Bronze finished second in the voting while Rapinoe's USA team-mate Morgan was third.

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