Dr Emir Crowne and Matthew Gayle, the lawyers representing the ousted executive of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) have proposed that Mark Hovell, a solicitor from Manchester, England, be the sole arbitrator in their case against football’s world governing body FIFA.

Lawyers representing the ousted executive of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) are demanding that FIFA withdraw their letter appointing the normalisation committee following their failure to respond to correspondence challenging the legality of said committee and the appointment of an interim manager.

They also declared that Tyril Patrick’s decision to remove himself as interim manager of the TTFA further strengthens their position.

On March 21, 2020, Patrick, who was the accountant employed by the previous TTFA administration, responded to the attorneys’ assertion that his appointment was invalid, stating that he was no longer accepting the appointment and that he had informed FIFA of his decision.

The lawyers, Matthew Gayle and Dr Emir Crowne, in a series of letters to Member Association Services Manager Sofia Malizia, questioned the motives behind FIFA’s installation of the normalization committee that replaced the executive that was constitutionally elected in November 2019.

“The political backdrop of this matter is not lost on those we represent,” Gayle wrote. “The ‘existing debt of at least USD 5.5’ was wholly accumulated under, or as a consequence of actions taken during the previous TTFA administration.

“That notwithstanding, FIFA stood idly by and took no punitive steps whatsoever. Now, in the face of a new administration with less than three months substantive tenure, which now threatens to uncover the rank impropriety of the previous administration by installing a regime of financial probity, the FIFA steps in an attempt to prevent this.

“It is passing strange that you purport to have installed Tyril Patrick, the accountant who oversaw at least in part the amassing of the very debt that the FIFA now complains of.”

Gayle and Dr Crowne also questioned the veracity of FIFA’s decision.

“The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association is a sovereign body established by an Act of Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago by way of Act 17 of 1982, The Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (Incorporation) Act, 1982.

“The duly elected executive or any individual member may only demit office by operation of the constitution of the TTFA, which makes no allowance for the appointment of yourself or any other person to ‘oversee’ the day to day affairs of the TTFA as the FIFA letter purports to do or in any other capacity in place of the duly elected executive.

“It is, therefore, our client’s respectful view that the FIFA letter is null, void and no legal effect. It is not in any way binding on them.”

FIFA had until 8:00 am Monday, March 23, to respond to the lawyers but did not, which prompted the lawyers to draft another letter stating their position.

“As you will no doubt we aware by this point, Mr. Patrick has declined to accede to your unlawful and/or void and/or improper and/or unconstitutional attempts to interfere in the day-to-day running of the TTFA by the duly elected executive, led by President Mr. William Wallace,” Mr Gayle wrote.

“Our client’s respectful view is that your failure to respond by the stipulated deadline, coupled with Mr. Patrick’s clear indication that for his part he recognises the sovereignty of the TTFA, is a clear indication that FIFA itself has acknowledged the sovereign nature of the TTFA, ought rightly to put this matter to an end.”

Lawyers representing the ousted executive of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) have written to FIFA, football’s world governing body questioning the timing of the appointment of the Normalisation Committee that has taken over the running of the association.

The William Wallace-led Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) is challenging FIFA’s decision to appoint a normalisation committee in a move that could see the matter appear the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

They have retained the services of noted attorneys Dr Emir Crowne and Matthew Gayle of New City Chambers to represent them in this regard.

"The current executive of the TTFA intends to challenge FIFA's appointment of a normalisation committee to oversee the affairs of the association and will seek whatever provisional measures are available to it to maintain the status quo until the matter is fairly adjudicated," Dr Crowne confirmed to Sportsmax.TV on Wednesday.

Wallace unseated David John-Williams at the TTFA elections held in November 2019 after a contentious campaign over several issues, including the handling of the FA’s financial affairs. However, just months later the new leadership have found themselves facing the scrutiny of the world governing body, who have decided to intervene.

In a letter sent by FIFA Secretary General Fatma Samoura, TTFA General Secretary Ramesh Ramdhan, FIFA outlined their concerns about the financial status of the TTFA.

FIFA said its fact-finding mission found, among other concerns, that the “overall condition of financial management and financial governance extremely low or non-existent at the TTFA.

“There are currently no formal internal policies and internal controls in place, such as procurement, the delegation of financial authorities, financial planning and budgeting, effective oversight of funding and management reporting, which are necessary to meet the TTFA’s objectives.”

FIFA also said there is a lack of documented policies and procedures, financial planning and management of statutory liabilities adding that there no short or long-term plan to address the “urgent” situation.

Going further, FIFA expressed the concern that given the situation along with the USD$5.5m debt, the TTFA “faces a very real risk of both insolvency and illiquidity if corrective measures are not applied urgently.”

As such, the normalisation committee has been mandated to run the daily affairs of the TTFA, establish a debt repayment plan that is implementable by the TTFA, as well as review and amend the TTFA statutes and ensure their compliance with FIFA statutes and requires before submitting them to the TTFA Congress for approval.

The committee will also organize and conduct elections of a new TTFA executive for a four-year term.

 

 

 

 

 

Trinidad and Tobago athlete Quincy Wilson is suing the National Association of Athletic Associations over what he claims is the association’s negligence which caused him to become injured thereby losing the ability to earn, to train and prepare for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

The suit was filed in Trinidad and Tobago's High Court of Justice on Monday. Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crys­tal Paul, and Ja­son Jones are representing the disaffected athlete.

The 28-year-old Wilson is an eight-time national champion and holds the national record of 59.65m. He has also represented Trinidad and Tobago at the CARIFTA Games and in 2011 won a bronze medal at the NACAC U23 Championships in Mexico.

In late July, on or about the 28th, Wilson was competing at the national championships. He stepped into the ring and executed two throws. Two other throws were fouls. However, on his fifth throw, he slipped and fell.

According to court documents obtained by Sportsmax.TV, Wilson suffered shock and severe pain, a meniscal tear in his right knee, pain in both knees. He subsequently experienced psychological damage, mental anguish and a loss of quality of life.

Wilson claims his subsequent inability to train has affected his mood and personality, and he is unable to carry out his household chores and his responsibilities as a husband and father.

He blames the NAAA in that they or their employees painted or covered the discus circle with the wrong substance making it slippery. He also claims that the NAAA failed to ensure that the discus circle was at the requisite standard of safety and that they failed to inspect the circle prior to his accident.

Wilson also claims, among other things, that the NAAA failed to use a certified IAAF official to inspect the circle.

As a result, he wants the NAAA to pay for or facilitate his rehabilitation, cover his lost wages. He is also seeking compensation for the loss of opportunity to compete professionally and possibly attracting sponsors.

Noted sports attorney Dr Emir Crowne is warning regional professional cricketers to be wary of dubious establishments seeking to represent them.

Lawyers representing the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) are proceeding to initiate legal action against noted attorney Dr Emir Crowne after the latter refused to apologize for alleged defamatory comments he made about the commission in  August this year.

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