West Indies captain Kieron Pollard has insisted the door is not closed on former skipper Darren Sammy, despite it being three years since his last appearance.

The 36-year-old Sammy, who captained the Caribbean T20 team to two World Cup titles, last appeared for the West Indies against a Pakistan XI in 2017.  Sammy’s tenure with the team seemed to have come to an end in acrimonious circumstances after he was removed as captain and dropped after publicly criticising the West Indies administration after they won the tournament in 2016.

Pollard, however, noted that as it stands all players are eligible for selection and Sammy is no exception.

“We have made clear to the (new Cricket West Indies) administration that everyone is available for selection in that pool. No one is an exception to the rule. Performances and fitness and everything we are looking for,” Pollard told members of the media.

The 33-year-old Pollard replaced Jason Holder as the ODI captain and Carlos Brathwaite in T20Is last September.  Sammy will look to make his mark in the upcoming Caribbean Premier League where he will represent the St Lucia Zouks.

Former West Indies T20 captain, Darren Sammy, has insisted he has not yet given up on the idea of once again representing the West Indies.

The 36-year-old successfully captained the regional team to two T20 World Cup titles in the 2012 and 2016 tournaments.  The player has, however, not represented the regional team since a Pakistan versus World-XI match in 2017.  On that occasion, several players opted not to take part in the tournament.

After criticism of the then West Indies Cricket Board in 2016, following the end of the tournament, Sammy was dropped from the team as well as relieved of the captaincy.

“The main focus is to do well for the Zouks, and that will raise eyebrows in terms of West Indies selection,” Sammy told members of the media.

“I am in a very good place mentally. I am not under any pressure to perform and keep my spot, so I am just here to elevate the youngsters, and I think I am closer to the end,” he added.

Sammy will represent the St Lucia Zouks at this season's Caribbean Premier League (CPL) tournament, as the team looks to claim a maiden title. T20 star Chris Gayle had been expected to boost those hopes after signing for the Zouks earlier this year, but later opted out of the tournament.

 

 

Barbados Tridents captain Jason Holder has pointed to the team’s leg-spinning duo of Hayden Walsh Jr and Rashid Khan as crucial components of its quest to retain the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) title.

Walsh Jr showed up for the Tridents big time last season his 22 wickets, at an economy rate of 8.28, crucial for the Barbados franchise run to its second trophy.

 For the coming campaign, he will be joined by Khan, who last played in the CPL for the Guyana Amazon Warriors in 2017.  On that occasion, the bowler managed to pick up 14 wickets, including the tournament’s first-ever hat trick.

Holder was quick to admit that he was eager to see the duo bowl in tandem, as it could only mean good things for the team.

“We expect big things from them,” Holder told members of the media.

“Hayden was last year’s ‘player of the tournament’ and Rashid is a world-class leg-spinner. We expect big things from both of them, and they are looking forward to bowling in tandem. It is a matter for them to execute and lead the charge,” he added.

The tournament, which will take place in a bio-secure environment, will run from August 18 through to September 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get well soon Barca

August 16, 2020

All hail Bruno Fernandes! 

There hasn't been much to celebrate at Manchester United for the last few years and the success enjoyed under legendary manager Alex Ferguson is a distant memory. Despite not being a Man U fan, as a sports journalist, I award credit where it is due. The introduction of Bruno Fernandes in January has positively impacted the club. 

United boss, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, did not hesitate when heaping praises on the Portuguese for his game-changing ability. “He knows that keepers will wait for him to do the jump. He practices both of them and he practices both sides so he’s got them sorted. Better than I was anyway,”  Solskjaer said in reference to the player’s successful penalty-taking technique.

The results speak for themselves, since his debut at the club, United has not lost a game in the league, rising up the table to finish third and qualify for next season's UEFA Champions League for the first time since the 2018-19 season.  His eight league goals and seven assists demonstrate his calibre.  What is clear is that in Fernandes you have a leader, risk-taker and quality player. Man U are definitely stronger with the twenty-five-year-old. 

CPL - Hard work behind the scenes 

The Caribbean Premier League is the biggest party in sport. It brings together people from different walks of life eager to support their teams.  Being staged amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 edition is shaping up to be different in numerous ways.  Sometimes, it is easy to by-pass the immense work that occurs behind the scenes to ensure fans can enjoy the matches.  This year the job is made even more difficult with no fans in the stands and a lengthy list of COVID-19 protocols to adhere to.  Earlier this week, I interviewed Head of Digital at CPL, Vishnu Kumar, who expressed great excitement for the tournament getting underway on August 18th

  Kumar stressed the importance of ensuring that CPL puts on a great show for fans around the world amidst the pandemic.  He explained, however, that even his journey to Trinidad and Tobago was not a simple task. “Air travel at COVID-19 times is extremely challenging but our operations team worked very hard to get us on flights with great social distancing and safety protocols in place and we flew first to Barbados where we quarantined for a few days before travelling onwards to Trinidad. We took a PCR swab test before we left to ensure that we were safe to travel and also had to wear masks and maintain social distancing throughout the duration of travel," he explained.

As if the travel to T&T was not difficult enough, as the CPL team get ready for a successful and exciting tournament, they are tasked with maintaining social distancing at all times.  The head of digital explained that they are required to work in assigned bubbles to ensure the safety of the entire cohort.  This means work that would normally be done face to face is being conducted online, sometimes plagued by faulty internet connections.  

  Despite being faced with immense challenges, Kumar sees simply getting all the players to T&T safe and sound as a success in and of itself. He explained that the entire CPL team is working to ensure they cover all the bases and demand the most of themselves to ensure that CPL 2020 continues to be the biggest party in sport. 

  Get well soon Barca! 

Barcelona are set to have presidential elections in the summer of 2021, as they seek a successor to incumbent Josep Maria Bartomeu, however, it is clear more than that is required to save the club. Friday's 8-2 loss to Bayern Munich was the heaviest Barca have suffered in Europe and ends a season that has also seen them lose the La Liga title to Real Madrid.  

It is hard to imagine how long it will take Barcelona to get over the impact of ‘The 8-2’ but what I do know is things must turnaround very soon if the club is to be a competitive force again.  What is clear is that the club needs structural change, a complete overhaul.  Things have deteriorated to the extent that Messi’s exasperation has been made public several times. 

The off-field problems are so numerous that they have seeped on to the field of play, for example, confrontations between players and the board over pay cuts. Messi has called out the sporting director Eric Abidal for blaming the players over the dismissal of Valverde.  

Apart from off the field problems, Barca has not managed their signings well. They signed Philippe Coutinho, for more than 100 million pounds but mishandled him. This failure to integrate a player of his quality into the squad has backfired miserably. He is now loaned out to Bayern Munich and scored twice in the final minutes against Barca. 

    As a Barcelona fan, I can only hope the team gets its business in order very soon, keeping in mind that Messi is not getting younger. The level of dependence on the player has to stop. Get well soon Barca! 

Former West Indies fastbowler and cricket commentator, Ian Bishop, is watching the Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) with bated breath, as he sees the tournament and as a proof of concept for cricket’s way forward.

Cricket has been at a virtual standstill, with a smattering of games being undertaken in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, but according to Bishop, if a big tournament like the CPL can maintain its bio-security, then the world has a model from which it can re-start regular programming.

According to Bishop, the resources of England made it easier for that country to host the recent #raisethebat series against the West Indies but that the CPL would prove that even countries without those resources can also maintain the same kind of safety.

"Firstly, the economic resources that England and the broadcasters put into that West Indies-England Test series and the Pakistan one that's going on now is significant," Bishop said during a press conference organised by the ICC following the worldwide premiere of its documentary Beyond the Boundary.

Bishop made mention of the fact that the two grounds at which the #raisethebat series were played had hotels there which is not the norm.

But Bishop, who is in T&T where he will operate as one of the commentators on the CPL, believes this tournament an even more important testing ground than the Manchester and Southampton models.

“We don't have as many resources, economically, to put into it, but our folks have been brilliant in utilising the hotel and the staff, the protective forces in carrying out this bubble so far. We still have a month to go, but the end of that month, we will know even better how teams and countries and boards without the economic advantage can carry this out safely,” said Bishop.

According to Bishop, the success of the CPL will depend heavily on the discipline of players as well, saying responsibility in maintaining a safe environment was huge.

“The players have to take responsibility, they have to take ownership of this, discipline themselves and mentally steel themselves in this new normal about staying away from the public and doing things responsibly,” said Bishop.

The CPL example, Bishop went on to say, was also important to the women’s game in the Caribbean, which has been stagnant since sport’s lockdown, months ago.

“Now the women's game and the administrators can look at this without endangering anyone's lives and say, 'Ah, we can play cricket safely.' So now is the time to get back on the bicycle and start putting things in place because I don't know the women's game can continue to be as inactive as it has been. We must now look to drive it forward, even if it's for bilateral tours because we know we can do it safely,” he said.

“So this [the CPL's bubble] is another research and development project. And if we can do it here in Trinidad, I promise you that anyone else in the world can do it because we are doing it without the millions of dollars that other territories may have, so keep an eye on the Hero CPL and if we can do this properly, it will be great.”

The Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) over the course of seven years has cemented its place in my heart as one of my favourite competitions.

This year, there almost was none, but the administrators of the CPL adapted, showing a willingness to innovate and Trinidad and Tobago, maybe not for the best reasons, stepped in to help fill the breach.

With travel restrictions the order of the day, with COVID-19 cases worldwide rising to more than 21 million cases, with more than 760,000 deaths, the CPL could easily not have happened.

Players in the Caribbean who ply their trade in T20 leagues all over the world have been, in a word, stuck.

This is why it is incredulous to me, how one of these players managed to miss his flight.

Fabian Allen would have missed tournaments after the shutdown of sport and should have been anxious to get back onto the field.

Mixing up the time of the only flight that would allow him to take part in the tournament seems careless on somebody’s part.

Then there was also an announcement that Ramnaresh Sarwan would not be taking up coaching duties with the Jamaica Tallawahs this season.

That announcement was in addition to an upheaval in the Tallawahs that began with Chris Gayle’s distasteful movement to the St Lucia Zouks and Andre Russell’s declaration that this would be his last season with the Tallawahs.

Eventually Gayle would pull out of the tournament altogether, leaving a star-shaped gap in the competition.

Spare a thought for the Zouks though, who, while having good players in their roster, seem to be lacking some star power.

Then there was more controversy once the teams got to Trinidad and Tobago.

Apparently, the local T&T players were not subject to the same protocols as visitors and those visitors got pissed.

Daren Sammy, skipper of the Zouks, was most vocal about this, saying no team should have had the advantage of being allowed to train early because they were not yet in the isolation of the bubble at the Hilton Hotel.

In addition, Sammy and others felt the longer the locals were allowed to stay outside of the bubble, the greater the chances of their entry being unsafe for those already in the bio-secure environment.

Chief of CPL operations Michael Hall sought to reassure the other teams, however, that all precautions were taken to make sure the entrance of the T&T players into the bubble was safe.

So, with just about four days to go before the start of the tournament, things don’t look great.

And the CPL, while producing great cricket, has been a big seller because it showcases the self-proclaimed greatest party in sport.

But can the tournament stand just on the performances of the players?

Can the worldwide acclaim it has garnered still be guaranteed without the fans?

Can the pitches in the twin-island republic where the entire tournament is to be played, stand up to the rigours of as many games as will be played on them?

Whatever the case, just as the West Indies were the first team to stand up for cricket during these uncertain times, the CPL has stood up for the franchise format the world over.

If the CPL can manage to answer these questions in a positive way, then cricket might just come out on the other side of COVID-19 smelling like roses.

 Former West Indies fast bowler turned noted commentator Ian Bishop believes the successful hosting of the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) in Trinidad and Tobago should serve as a signal for a more widescale return for the sport across the globe.

Following a months-long break, international cricket officially returned to the global calendar with the West Indies versus England series and is continuing with the England versus Pakistan series.  Bishop, however, pointed out that most countries could not match the tremendous resources need to put on those contests.

He believes if the CPL is able to host the tournament successfully on what must certainly amount to a shoestring budget compared to the amount spent by the England Cricket Board, then other countries should be able to as well.

"Firstly, the economic resources that England and the broadcasters put into that West Indies-England Test series and the Pakistan one that's going on now is significant," Bishop said during a press conference organised by the ICC.

"I don't think there are too many other countries that will have the resources to do it like that because you've got two grounds where hotels are actually on the ground,” he added.

"Another testing ground is where I am now. I am sitting in the Hilton in Trinidad where our CPL T20 is going to start next week.  We don't have as many resources, economically, to put into it, but our folks have been brilliant in utilising the hotel and the staff, the protective forces in carrying out this bubble so far. We still have a month to go, but at the end of that month, we will know even better how teams and countries and boards without the economic advantage can carry this out safely.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Guyana Amazon Warriors have appointed Chris Green as their captain for the 2020 season.

The Australian off-spinning all-rounder is back with the Amazon Warriors for the third year having first played for the Franchise in 2018, and he has taken 23 wickets at an average of 22 in his 23 matches for the team.

Green stood in as captain during the 2018 season so this will be his second spell in charge of the Amazon Warriors. A firm fan favourite, Green was part of the Guyana team who finished as runners up at the Hero CPL in both the 2018 and 2019 seasons and he will be hoping he can lead the team to their first title in 2020.

“I am hugely excited to be back with the Amazon Warriors for another season and honoured to be leading them for this season. Guyana is somewhere I am hugely fond of and we are very confident that this is the year that we can win the Hero CPL title for our amazing fans back home,” Green said.

Nicholas Pooran, the Franchise’s marquee player, and one of the most exciting T20 batting talents in the Caribbean has been appointed as the vice-captain of the team and will definitely lend quality support to Chris Green. Pooran, who joined the Franchise last year, was the youngest players to play in the CPL in the first year of the League in 2013. He has played in all the editions of CPL to date and brings that experience to the team.

“Chris has been a fantastic part of the Amazon Warriors family since he joined us for the 2018 season and he was the natural choice to take the reins for this season. He is a fantastic cricketer and a fine leader and we are very confident that he will guide the team to a successful season,” said Omar Khan, Guyana Amazon Warriors Team Operations Manager.

“Nicholas as Wicketkeeper/batsman and one of the inspirational players of the team last year has demonstrated leadership qualities which have seen him elevated to the vice-captain position this year.’’

The 2020 Hero CPL season bowls off in Trinidad and Tobago on September 10.

Caribbean Premier League (CPL) COO Michael Hall has revealed the competition’s delight at increased interest in viewership demand, despite the scaled down nature of this season’s tournament.

With the region and globe disrupted by the effects of the coronavirus this year’s edition of the tournament will be held in Trinidad and Tobago.  The event, which will get under way August 18, will be played in a bio secure environment and without fans, which Hall admits is a big challenge.

“We will be no different than any other sporting event that has taken place since the pandemic.  Is it going to be the same, ‘absolutely not’,” Hall told the Mason and Guest radio program.

The CPL has throughout the years being known for vociferous fans, which some speculate might affect the intensity level of the cricket played.

“I don’t know how much of a factor (no spectators) that is in players performances.  I’ve always heard that the really great athletes shut out the crowd and focus, so I don’t know. But are we going to miss the fans, absolutely there are the lifeblood of the tournament,” he added.

“We are still having the tournament though, fans or no fans.  I know for a fact based on feedback.  Based on feedback, these are things that we track, the anticipation for our global viewing audience has almost trebled.  There have been people reaching out to ask where we can watch it, saying we are dying to watch it and that is only good for the league.”

The CPL will be the first T20 tournament played since the start of the pandemic.

 

Teams in this year’s Hero Caribbean Premier League have voiced annoyance with a decision that seems to have given a slight advantage to the Trinbago Knight Riders ahead of the competition’s start on August 18.

The grievance appears to have been caused because local players from the TKR did not join the bio-secure bubble at the Hylton Hotel, continuing to train.

The first teams allowed to train were announced on Tuesday with the St Lucia Zouks and the Knight Riders getting the go ahead. According to a release from the CPL, local players had gone through the mandatory testing process and would this week enter the bubble.

“Everyone should have been part of the bubble from the first day to “guarantee” that the health and safety of all stakeholders is not “compromised”, read a social media post from Zouks skipper Daren Sammy.

"How can everybody else be in a bubble no access to training or practice games while others on the outside in a COVID infected area be training and playing practice games. Then allowed to join the bubble without self-isolation," read another from the Zouks skipper.

According to reports, defending champions, Barbados Tridents have also not taken kindly to the difference being shown to the local TKR players and asked why it was that all players from the franchise were not asked to enter the bubble and undergo the mandatory weeklong quarantine everybody else did.

But according to Michael Hall, operations director of the CPL, it was necessary to take precautions to ensure local players entering the bubble were not a threat to the environment’s bio-security.

The injury to Dwayne Bravo that kept him out of the 2019 edition of the Hero Caribbean Premier League and saw Kieron Pollard replace him as captain of the Trinbago Knight Riders may have been fortuitous.

Pollard had big shoes to fill, as Bravo had led the TKR to back-to-back titles in 2017 and 2018.

The big West Indies captain, the most experienced T20 player in the history of the format, lost to eventual champions Barbados Tridents in the second qualifier for the competition’s final in 2019.

Still, he has retained his position as skipper in the team and has the blessing of his predecessor.

CEO of the TKR, Venky Mysore, revealed recently that Bravo, though very successful as captain of the team, had, for a long time, wanted to pass the baton, but he had delayed the action.

"The champion DJ Bravo has been coming to me year after year and asking me to give someone else the captaincy because he wants to just concentrate on playing and enjoying the game,” said Mysore.

Bravo, who recently came out of international retirement, has also played under Pollard for the West Indies and has lauded his approach to captaincy.

“I always told him not until I am ready and that time has come and he is very happy to play under Pollard,” said Mysore.

The TKR will open the CPL season against last year’s beaten finalists, the Guyana Amazon Warriors on August 18.

“Pollard was kind enough to accept the position to lead the team at the tournament. He said if we wanted him to do it he will and we said that we will be delighted to have him as captain again,” said Mysore.

On many a Sunday, I realize that people have looked at the stories they've seen throughout the week with different lenses. I have my own personal take on some of these issues and I will share them with you. Welcome to #INCASEYOUMISSEDIT

Kudos, King on making a difference on and off the field

Jamaican hard-hitting batsman, Brandon King, is using his platform as a cricketer to support the Black Lives Matter movement and those affected by the coronavirus pandemic. This selfless gesture of the young man is deserving of mention and commendation.

King, who belongs to the Caribbean Premier League franchise Guyana Amazon Warriors, scored the most runs, 496, in the 2019 edition of the tournament. He held the highest score in the tournament, 132, at an average of 55.11.  He also scored the most 6’s with a total of 32. The 25-year-old game-changer scored a 72-ball 132 against the Barbados Tridents to propel the Guyana Amazon Warriors to the 2019 CPL final. 

       On Instagram, King posted, “Over the past few months, I’ve had some time to really think about how I could make a positive impact on communities affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and also the Black Lives Matter movement.” 

“So, this year I will be sporting my black SG stickers and along with my management team, GGSM, we will be donating USD$100 for every six I hit during this year’s CPL tournament. Donations will be split between the Greater Trench Town, in Jamaica, and a charity in Guyana to be decided at a later date.”

“As athletes, we have the platform to speak up and make effective change,” he said.

“I am encouraging my sponsors, other athletes, and friends to join in on donations by either supporting a #BLM initiative of your choice or by matching my donations towards these local charities.

I am hopeful and looking forward to getting back out on the field very soon. Thanks for your support and let’s go Amazon Warriors.”

Some may see this as a small gesture that will go a long way, but I see a young man who cares about the less fortunate and those unable to speak up for what they believe in. This gesture will raise awareness and impact those affected by these issues in a positive manner. Based on the current climate, athletes need to use their voices and resources to educate those around them. Well done King!

CWI, what’s the big deal sharing information that has already been leaked?

The lawyer for former Cricket West Indies President, Dave Cameron, says he has filed an application with the Antigua High Court for CWI to disclose to his client a copy of the financial audit conducted by accounting and management consulting firm, ‘Pannel Kerr Foster.’

After Cameron demitted office, the new Ricky Skerritt-led board commissioned PKF consultancy to look at the board’s finances and to submit recommendations. However, the report, which was handed to the board in December last year, also found its way into the public domain and called out the former president on several items including an honorarium, monies sent by the Indian board, reportedly for past players and sponsorship money intended for the Dominican Board, which found its way directly to Cricket West Indies. It is difficult for me to understand how withholding this information benefits CWI. Is it that they are trying to protect current members of their team? These are questions that may remain unanswered.

Attorney Tony Astaphan argues it is unfair for his client’s credibility to be called into question without him even having a chance to see the document in question and to defend himself. The only logical thing to do is to let Cameron see the audit, right?

Something must be done to ensure our women cricketers remain competitive

The Women’s 50 over World Cup has been postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic. The tournament was scheduled for February 6 to March 7, 2021, in New Zealand, but will now be held February to March 2022. It means three major women’s events will be staged in 2022. The T20 World Cup and the Commonwealth Games are the other two. While it is understandable given the circumstances surrounding COVID-19, Cricket West Indies need to do more for the Windies women.

  Most of these cricketers have dedicated all their time to the sport, it is their full-time job and as a result, it results in a major hit to their finances. A lack of competition also directly affects the form of our Windies women as the situation represents a sudden break in their momentum. CWI should find a reasonable alternative to ensure our women cricketers get back to playing some sort of competitive cricket and they do not become complacent. When a few Windies women were posed with the question, “How does this postponement of the World Cup affect you?” this is how they responded:

Britney Cooper: It’s very disappointing that it is postponed, after the exciting and good quality of cricket that was played in the 2017 World Cup, in England, many were looking forward to an even better World Cup in New Zealand. Looking at the ICC calendar for the next few years you can see it’s full of events for the men. The fact is that they had to take months to decide on the men’s T20 World Cup but only two weeks to decide on the postponement of the women’s. With the postponement, I don't think there will be many cricket tours taking place, which means that women's cricket will be put on the back burner.

Kycia Knight: It is disappointing to hear of the postponement of the World Cup as everyone around the world was looking forward to the tournament, especially after the success of the World T20 tournament in Australia. With that being said, it would give teams enough time to properly prepare for such a big tournament as some teams have not yet started to prepare as a unit. The tournament would've been the final World Cup event for some players and they were looking forward to the tournament and I believe it would be a little disappointing for them to have to wait a little while longer.

Karishma Ramharack: As of now, the safety of the players is important so the decision to postpone may seem best. The worst part is that the wait to get on the field is longer! However, this gives teams a proper and fair chance to prepare fully following the safety precautions. Teams can now devise proper strategies and training methods to be much more prepared for the tournament.

With the Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) set to begin in a matter of weeks, players like Rahkeem Cornwall have been looking at how to give themselves an advantage.

Cornwall is no different, with the big off-spinner hoping for a season like the one he had in 2019.

Known more as a bowling allrounder, last season Cornwall was immense with the bat for the St Lucia Zouks, scoring 254 runs in 10 matches, with a highest of 75.

“Obviously, it’s going to be different from the previous CPL where you have the crowd and so on, but at the end of the day cricket still remains the same. I would like to continue where I left off last year because I think I had a pretty good year in the CPL last year where I scored the most runs for the St. Lucia Zouks, and there is no doubt that I want to repeat that this year,” said Cornwall in an interview with the Antigua Observer.

According to Cornwall, players doing well is usually the result of hard work and he has no issue with putting in the effort that it takes to repeat that performance.

“I just have to put in the work and I think we have a couple of days or just over a week to get ready before the tournament, so I am sure I will be fine by then, and I will just keep putting the numbers on the board,” he said.

“As a professional, you have to know what you need to do to get yourself ready for a match. I think you just have to keep practising, and once all of the protocols [quarantine and testing] are over and you are out of isolation, then your mind would automatically switch back to cricket and you just have to know what you need to do in terms of your role for the team, and by then, hitting the 18th [August], you should be ready,” he said.'

Cornwall will again turn out for the St Lucia Zouks who will play their opening game against the Jamaica Tallawahs on August 19 at the Brian Lara Cricket Academy.

West Indies allrounder Fabian Allen will take no part in this year’s Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) after missing his flight from Jamaica to Barbados.

Players, staff and officials, were required to arrive in Trinidad and Tobago two weeks ahead of the CPL’s August 18 start.

A number of chartered flights were arranged for the trips, including one from Jamaica to Barbados on Monday. Allen, who was to have competed for the St Kitts and Nevis Patriots, was to have been on that flight but missed it courtesy of a mix-up in flight times as per his agent.

"Unfortunately there was some confusion with his understanding of the flight details and he missed the flight," said Allen's agent in an interview with ESPNcricinfo.

"We explored all possibilities, but due to the pandemic and travel restrictions in Trinidad, the charter flight on Monday was the only way he could enter the country."

Allen has been a mainstay in the Patriots team since 2017.

All 162 players, administrators and officials tested negative for the coronavirus Covid-19 after they arrived in Trinidad and Tobago for the 2020 season of the Hero CPL.

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