Legendary West Indies captain, Clive Lloyd, insists the current crop of players must learn to play in all conditions if the team is to eventually emerge from the doldrums of world cricket.

In the aftermath of the recent squad selection for the West Indies tour of Bangladesh, plenty of eyebrows were raised not only due to the absence of 12 first team players but following the non-selection of promising young fast bowler Chemar Holder for the Test cricket squad.

The team has the typical fast-bowling trio of Shannon Gabriel, Kemar Roach, and Alzarri Joseph but with captain Jason Holder opting out of the tour, many thought Chemar would have been a natural replacement, particularly after a promising debut in difficult circumstances last month.

Cricket West Indies chief of selectors Clive Lloyd, however, explained that the panel had chosen to include more spinners at the expense of Holder, due to the nature of spin-friendly surfaces in Bangladesh.  Lloyd believes the decision could cost the young bowler valuable experience.

“These guys need to play in those countries where it’s not that helpful and you learn to bowl a better line and length,” Lloyd told the Mason and Guest radio show.

“On the dead pitches, someone like (Collin) Croft would still be disconcerting.  He would be getting it up into your neck.  The point is that our fast bowlers bowled well on any kind of wicket,” he added.

“Our bowlers were not deterred by slow pitches and that is what our youngsters have to learn, to bowl on pitches that are not responsive.  Dennis Lille, when he realized the pitch was not helping, he would cut down his run and bowl a different kind of delivery, cutters, and so on and make you think about your cricket.  So did Richard Hadlee, Andy Roberts, Michael Holding, all these guys would have learned to bowl on wickets that are not responsive.  If we are just going to rest people because the wickets are not responsive then something is wrong.”  

 

West Indies fast bowling legend Curtly Ambrose has rubbished suggestions conditions in Bangladesh are a good reason for up and coming fast bowler Chemar Holder to be left out of the Test team for next month’s tour.

The 22-year-old made his debut under difficult conditions in New Zealand, earlier this month, performing creditably despite a heavy loss for the West Indies.  Holder ended with figures of 2 for 110, with one maiden, but often providing some testing deliveries despite not claiming more wickets.

For next month's tour, despite 12 first-team players opting not to take part in the series, there is no space in the Bangladesh Test squad for Holder.  One of the players missing is West Indies captain Jason Holder, who typically makes up part of a pace bowling quartet alongside Shannon Gabriel, Kemar Roach, and Alzarri Joseph.

Some believe Holder would have proved a suitable replacement for his namesake, but Cricket West Indies chief of selectors Roger Harper pointed out that the player had been excluded for a spinner, considering the spin-friendly nature of pitches in Asia.

Ambrose, however, does not agree and pointed out that it is crucial the young fast bowler, having shown promise, be given the opportunity to excel in all kinds of conditions.

“That to me is utter nonsense.  I can’t support that.  If you want to be a top-class international cricketer, you have to be able to bowl on all surfaces, in all conditions anywhere you go,” Ambrose said.

“To me, that type of reason does not hold any water, it is disappointing.  Having made his debut in New Zealand and done fairly well on his debut, he is full of confidence, he is one of the guys for the future in my view.  To be left out of the Test squad to me was a big surprise…Don’t tell me because it’s a spin-friendly environment that you are going to, you want to walk with 10 spinners, that to me makes no sense.”

 

Shannon Gabriel took his 150th Test wicket in his 50th Test match while Chemar Holder bowled well for his two wickets on debut but it was Henry Nicholls who stole the show with an unbeaten 117 at stumps on day one of the second Test in Wellington on Thursday night (Caribbean time).

West Indies fast bowler Chemar Holder claimed two quick wickets to lead the team’s incursions into the New Zealand A batting line-up, as the hosts made it to 249/4 at stumps, on day three of the tour match in Queenstown.

The reply, anchored by Will Young’s unbeaten 80 from 161 balls, left the Kiwis still some 322 runs short of the Windies’ mammoth first innings total of 571.  New Zealand resumed day 3 at 45 without loss and pushed on to 100 before spinner Rahkeem Cornwall got the breakthrough, with the lbw dismissal of Rachin Ravindra. 

Ten overs later, his opening partner Henry Cooper also departed the scene after being trapped lbw off the bowling of Holder.  He left the crease having tallied a patient 54 in close to 200 minutes.  Joe Carter was next to bat but did not last long.  He only faced eight deliveries, making one run, before being caught behind by Shane Dowrich off Holder.

West Indies captain Jason Holder then got in on the act with a delivery that caught Ken McClure lbw just before tea.  McClure made 20 runs and faced 53 deliveries.  New Zealand A captain Cole McConchie, however, partnered with Young to steady the ship before bad light ended the day’s play.

Rachin Ravindra scored a century as New Zealand ‘A’ declared on 308 for 3 on the opening day of their three-day match against the West Indies at the John Davies Oval in Queenstown, New Zealand on Thursday.

 The West Indies then lost the wicket of John Campbell before the close of play with the West Indies still 291 runs behind.

After winning the toss and choosing to bat, New Zealand crept to 43 in 16 overs before Will Young was caught down the leg side for 27 trying to pull a short one from Chemar Holder.

The dismissal brought Henry Nichols to the crease where he and Ravindra mounted a second-wicket stand of 160, putting the Caribbean bowlers to the sword.

After a slow start, Ravindra grew in confidence, scoring 112 from 187 balls in a knock that included 10 fours and two sixes. Nichols proved to be a solid partner hitting eight fours before Raymon Reifer had him caught behind by Joshua DaSilva for a well-played 76.

It was soon 227 for 3 as Ravindra was eventually caught by Kemar Roach after pulling Alzarri Joseph to deep backward square leg.

Devon Conway was on 46 and Joe Carter, 41, when Captain Cole McConchie called the declaration after 79 overs.

Reifer was the best of the West Indies bowlers with 1 for 29 from his seven overs with Holder taking 1 for 58 and Josephs 1 for 55.

Campbell was dismissed for 4 playing on trying to pull Blair Tickner, whose previous delivery he had hit to the boundary.

However, Kraigg Brathwaite remained unbeaten on two and Darren Bravo, 8, as the West Indies got to the close on 17 for 1.

  

 

 

Had Marva Holder been alive she would have been a very proud grandmother.

On Wednesday, her grandson, Chemar Holder, received a call from Cricket West Indies for his first tour with the men’s senior team that will play three Tests in England starting July 8.

For Holder, the leading pace bowler in the West Indies Championships that concluded in March, it was a dream come true.

“It was a good feeling yesterday (Wednesday) when I got the call to know that I was included in the 15. It was something that I was always looking forward to and now I have got the opportunity to represent my country,” he said.

Holder, 22, took 36 wickets at a healthy average of 18.91 during the championships that was ended with two rounds to go because of the Coronavirus pandemic, leaving him just four wickets shy of the target he had set at the start of the season.

Nonetheless, the West Indies selectors rewarded him with a place in the senior squad that is set to play the ‘bio-secure’ Tests series.

“Chemar Holder is an exciting young fast bowling talent who is coming off an excellent domestic First-Class season. He should enjoy bowling in English conditions. He could prove a real asset to the team in England,” said Roger Harper, Cricket West Indies Chief Selector.

Coming from a cricket-loving family, Holder has always enjoyed their support.

“If things are not going well, they all talk to me, tell me to keep my head up, everything is not going to be the same,” he said. “So I always get support from them, especially my grandmother, who passed away. She was always my big supporter.

“She stayed up all night and watched me during the U19 World Cup. Every time I play I remember her so she would be happy to find out this news if she was alive today.”

Marva Holder passed away in 2016 at the age of 72.

 

 

Guyana’s Veerasammy Permaul was easily the most successful bowler during the West Indies Championships.

With 405 wickets in 98 Tests at an average of 20.99, Antigua’s Sir Curtly Ambrose is an icon of the sport. He also happens to be an inspiration for Barbadian fast bowler Chemar Holder.

With a 36-wicket haul in the just concluded West Indies Championships, few would argue that Barbados’ Chemar Holder is not too far away from a call to the West Indies senior team.

The Barbados Pride completed a 236-run victory over the Guyana Jaguars on Saturday, courtesy of West Indies stars Jason Holder and Kemar Roach in their West Indies Championship game at the Providence Stadium in Guyana.

The Pride were devastating with the ball, restricting the Jaguars to under 100 in both innings, the hosts scoring 55 and 94. While the Pride didn’t cover themselves with glory when they bat either, their 174 and 210 were more than enough.

When the Pride bat first, they had no answer to Keemo Paul, whose 3-61 led the way. They didn’t have many responses to Romario Shepherd (2-15), or Raymon Reifer (2-19).

But if the Pride had no answer to the trio, the Jaguars didn’t even understand the questions Roach, who bagged 5-20 and Holder, who had 4-24, were asking.

The two helped reduce the Jaguars to 54 before going back to bat where they fared a little better in the runs column but still could not deal with the pace and guile of Paul, who had 4-52. Kevin Sinclair, 2-28, and Christopher Barnwell, 2-26, were also markedly difficult for the Pride to negotiate, who benefitted from Kraigg Brathwaite’s 84 and Jonathan Carter’s 43.

In the first innings, Brathwaite had scored an important 48.

With a lead of 329, Roach and Co set to work again.

Roach ended with 4-40, while Chemar Holder got in on the act with 2-29.

Jason Holder had an easy afternoon, bowling just four overs, with 1-10.

Carter was also in the thick of things, taking 3-13.

Not for the first time this season, veteran first-class cricket batsman, Devon Smith, has been asked to do a repair job and save the Windward Islands Volcanoes from outright defeat.

Playing against the Barbados Pride at the Kensington Oval in Bridgetown, the Volcanoes find themselves 325 runs in arrears on the final day with seven second-innings wickets in hand.

The situation was created, first by Kyle Mayers’ fabulous batting in the Barbados middle order with his 140 helping the Pride to 417. The Volcanoes had no answer, as, despite half centuries from kavem Hodge, 53, and Andre Fletcher, 52, Chemar Holder’s 5-73 restricted them to 258.

From there, they were in real trouble, as the Pride would bat again to put on 239-4 in just 56 overs. Mayers, again, played a big part in the outcome, slamming 62 off just 43 balls to give the Pride time to bowl out the Volcanoes for a second time.

Justin Greaves, 53, Shayne Moseley, 60, and Kraigg Brathwaite, 49, also contributed to the scoreline.

Batting a second time, the Volcanoes are 73-3, with Roland Cato, 22, Hodge, nought, and Andre Fletcher, four, already back in the pavilion.

The not-out batsmen, tasked with the duty of batting out the day for the Volcanoes include Smith, who came to the crease at number five on Saturday, is now not out on 16. Alick Athanaze is the other man at the crease, he is on a patient 21 from 80 deliveries.

The Barbados Pride have a massive 329-run lead going into the final day of their West Indies Championship game against the Trinidad and Tobago Red Force in Bridgetown.

After scoring a paltry 209 in their first innings, the Pride hit back by skittling out the Red Force for just 175 before returning to the crease to rack up 342 and put pressure on the visitors who are now struggling at 48-4.

When the Pride bat for a second time, Kraigg Brathwaite scored 58, Sheyne Moseley had a wonderful knock of 155, and Kevin Stoute chipped in with an important 55.

Jeremy Solozano, with an even 50, was the only person to lay down a significant mark on the scoreboard in the Red Force’s 175.

On Sunday morning, Joshua Da Silva, on 23, and Yannic Cariah, on 12, will resume batting for the Red Force with Solozano, 5, Yannick Ottley, 1, Jason Mohammed, 5, and Denesh Ramdin, 0, all back in the pavilion.

Kemar Roach, 2-25, and Chemar Holder, 2-13, have been the destroyers so far.

Roach and Holder had bagged two wickets when they bowled to the Red Force the first time out, providing good support to Keon Harding, who had ended with 5-57.

Former West Indies Under-19 World Cup-winning pacer Chemar Holder led the demolition of the Jamaica Scorpions batting with a career-best return, propelling Barbados Pride to a 119-run victory in the West Indies Championship on Saturday.

Pacers Keon Harding and Chemar Holder set up hosts Barbados Pride for a memorable seven-wicket victory over five-time defending champions Guyana Jaguars in the West Indies Championship on Sunday.

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