Novak Djokovic led the way in a decade of dominance in men's tennis but it was a very different story in the women's game, as 20 different players claimed grand slam titles.

Djokovic won all but one of his 16 majors in the previous 10 years, with Rafael Nadal adding 13 to his tally to move just one adrift of Roger Federer's record haul of 20.

Only six men were grand slam champions in the past decade; Federer on five occasions, Stan Wawrinka and Andy Murray securing three apiece and Marin Cilic winning the 2014 US Open.

It has been much more difficult to predict which women will land the big prizes in the game, summed up by the fact there were four different winners in 2019.

Ash Barty and Bianca Andreescu claimed maiden major titles, while Naomi Osaka and Simona Halep won their second to prevent Serena Williams from matching Margaret Court's record total of 24.

We look back at how the leading lights have measured up in the 2010s and take a glimpse at what might unfold in the next 10 years.

 

RAFA CLOSING IN, SWEET 16 FOR DJOKOVIC

Nadal won three of the four majors in 2010 and added another two this year, further trimming Federer's advantage.

World number one Nadal only failed to win the French Open twice in the decade, while Djokovic was a six-time Australian Open champion and scooped a quintet of Wimbledon crowns.

Federer has been stuck on 20 grand slam triumphs since going back-to-back in Australia in 2018, with the most recent seven won by either Djokovic or Nadal.

Not since Wawrinka's success at Flushing Meadows in 2016 has a player other than Nadal, Djokovic or Federer won a men's grand slam singles title. 

 

SERENA WINS A DOZEN, BUT SHORT OF COURT

Williams confirmed her status as one of the all-time greats by winning a further 12 major singles titles since the turn of the decade.

The 38-year-old has remained on 23 since defeating her sister, Venus, when she was pregnant in the 2017 Australian Open final.

Williams has lost all four major finals since the birth of her daughter, Alexis Olympia, including the past two against Halep and Andreescu at Wimbledon and in New York respectively.

Angelique Kerber claimed three grand slams in the 2010s, while Kim Clijsters, Maria Sharapova, Li Na, Victoria Azarenka, Petra Kvitova, Halep, Garbine Muguruza and Osaka won two apiece.

 

ONUS ON NEXT GEN MEN TO STEP UP

While there had been concerns over what was to come with so many legends heading towards, or already in, the twilight of their careers, exciting talent has emerged in both the men

While there were concerns over what was to come with so many legends heading towards, or already in, the twilight of their careers, exciting talent has emerged in both the men's and women's game.  

Canadian teenager Andreescu capped a breakthrough season by winning the US Open, while world number one Barty is only 23 and the likes of Halep still have plenty of time on their side.

With Federer aged 38, Nadal 33, Djokovic 32 and Murray - hoping to work his way back up the rankings after recovering from hip surgery - also in his 30s, there will be a changing of the guard in the next decade.

Stefanos Tsitsipas gave another example of his huge potential by winning the ATP Finals title, while Dominic Thiem has been beaten by Nadal in the past two French Open finals.

Daniil Medvedev, Alexander Zverev, Felix Auger-Aliassime and Denis Shapovalov will also be hoping to come of age in the 2020s.

US Open champion Bianca Andreescu has delayed the start of her season by withdrawing from the Auckland Open.

Andreescu was due to take part in the WTA Tour event, which runs from January 6-12, alongside a strong field that includes Serena Williams and Coco Gauff.

But the Canadian will instead take further time to recuperate from the knee injury she sustained at the WTA Finals in Shenzhen in October, with ensuring full fitness for the upcoming Australian Open a likely factor in her decision.

Andreescu, the world number five, released a video on social media expressing her sorrow at having to withdraw from an event she was runner-up in at the start of this year.

"I'm super disappointed about it," the 19-year-old said.

"But I spoke to my team and I really have to do what's best for my knee right now. 

"I have so many amazing memories there, so hopefully I can create more in 2021."

A record 71million Australian Dollars in prize money will be on the line at next month's Australian Open in Melbourne.

Men's and women's singles champions will each collect 4.12m AUD following an increase of 13.6 per cent on the 2019 purse.

Players losing in the first round of the singles main draw will earn 90,000 AUD, up 20 per cent, while semi-finalists will take home 1.04m AUD – an increase of 13 per cent.

"We have long been committed to improving the pay and conditions for a deeper pool of international tennis players, in fact since AO 2007 prize money has more than tripled from 20m AUD to the 71m AUD for 2020 we are announcing today," Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley said on Tuesday.

"This year, as we do every year, we worked with the tours to establish the weighting for prize money increases round-by-round, and we pushed to reward players competing early in the tournament in both singles and doubles. 

"We strongly believe in growing prize money at all levels of the game and we will continue to work with the playing group to create viable career paths in the sport and enable more players to make more money."

Novak Djokovic will be eyeing a record-extending eighth Australian Open crown when he returns to defend his title at Melbourne Park.

Meanwhile, Japanese star Naomi Osaka is the defending champion in the women's singles.

 

Kim Clijsters will make her comeback to the WTA Tour next March after revealing the first three tournaments on her 2020 schedule.

The Belgian announced her plan to come out of retirement at the age of 36 back in September, though her return has been held up by a knee injury.

While Clijsters, who retired in 2012 after winning 41 singles titles, including four grand slams, is still continuing her recovery, she has committed to playing at the Monterrey Open, which gets underway on March 2.

She also intends to be in action in Indian Wells the following week, while the three-time US Open champion will be back on American soil at the start of April for the tournament in Charleston.

"I just wanted to let you know I've had a really good last couple of weeks regarding my knee. It's feeling much better," Clijsters said in a video posted on social media.

"It's not fully healed yet, but I'm definitely building up my intensity in practice.

"I look forward to playing in my first tournament. Practice has been long enough, but I have to be patient for a few more weeks, then I'll be ready to go."

Clijsters is eligible for unlimited wildcards at WTA tournaments as a former world number one, but she must play three tournaments or earn 10 points to re-establish a ranking.

Former world number one Naomi Osaka has hired Wim Fissette as her coach ahead of her Australian Open defence.

Osaka split from Sascha Bajin after clinching her second major title in Melbourne this year and brought Jermaine Jenkins on board to replace him.

The duo parted ways after the Japanese fell short in her attempt to retain her US Open crown, going down to Belinda Bencic in the fourth round.

Osaka worked with her father for the remainder of the season but has turned to Fissette ahead of the 2020 season, WTA Insider confirmed.

Among the players to have been coached by Belgian Fissette are Kim Clijsters, Victoria Azarenka, Angelique Kerber and Simona Halep.

Clijsters won three grand slams and Kerber triumphed at Wimbledon in 2018 while working with Fissette.

Osaka, who withdrew from the WTA Finals due to a right shoulder injury, is set to begin the new season at the Brisbane International in January.

Grand slam winner Francesca Schiavone has revealed she has been given the all-clear after being diagnosed with cancer.

The 2010 French Open champion did not make her diagnosis public until Friday, when the 39-year-old declared she is "back in action" in a video posted on social media.

Schiavone said: "Hi everyone, upon 7-8 [months] of silence from social media and from the world, I wish to share with you what happened to me.

"A cancer had been diagnosed to me. I did chemotherapy, I fought a tough battle and now I am still breathing. I have won this fight. And now I am back in action."

The Italian retired at the US Open last year after 22 seasons in the sport.

Former world number four Schiavone won eight WTA singles titles, the highlight of her career coming when she was crowned champion at Roland Garros with a victory over Sam Stosur.

World number six Elina Svitolina has added Marcos Baghdatis to her coaching team.

Baghdatis, a winner of four ATP Tour singles titles, retired at Wimbledon in July in order to spend more time with his family.

The 34-year-old Greek on Wednesday revealed he will assist Andrew Bettles in coaching WTA Finals runner-up Svitolina.

"I am so glad to announce the next chapter of my life and look forward to coaching a great athlete and super tennis player, No.6 ranked WTA player Elina Svitolina, working alongside Andy Bettles!" he posted on Instagram.

"I want to thank Elina for putting her trust in me. Let's do this! Bring on 2020."

Former world number three Svitolina failed to win a title this year, but broke new ground at grand slams by reaching the semi-final stage at Wimbledon and the US Open.

Ashleigh Barty denied the 25-year-old from Ukraine back-to-back WTA Finals titles in Shenzhen last month.

Bianca Andreescu has set her sights on becoming world number one and representing Canada at the Olympic Games in 2020.

Andreescu enjoyed a breakthrough 2019 in which she lost only seven of her 55 matches and completed an incredible run at the US Open, stunning Serena Williams in the final with a performance belying her tender years.

The 19-year-old, who retired from the WTA Finals because of a knee injury, collected the Lou Marsh Trophy this week as she was named Canada's athlete of the year.

Speaking at a media conference after being presented with the award, Andreescu told a media conference: "I don't know how 2020 can get better than 2019.

"If I could choose something it would be to accomplish my ultimate goal, which is to become number one in the world and hopefully win another grand slam and stay healthy as much as possible."

On her hopes of competing for her country in Tokyo, Andreescu told reporters: "I think there's a very good chance for me to be able to participate.

"I've watched the Olympics ever since I could remember, ever since I was a little girl so, if I do get that opportunity, it's going to be the best because I spoke to many athletes that were in the Olympics before and they've told me that it was the best experience of their life so if I get there it's going to be fun."

The next major event on the horizon for Andreescu is the Australian Open, for which she is the second favourite behind Williams.

"Every tournament I go into I want to win it," she said of her approach for the first grand slam of 2020.

"I'm just going to do the best I can to prepare, hopefully my knee's good and hopefully I can bring the trophy home."

Caroline Wozniacki will return to the court after her retirement to play in an exhibition match against Serena Williams.

Denmark's Wozniacki, 29, has announced she will be bringing her career to an end after the Australian Open, which begins next month.

But tickets have also gone on sale for a return to the court in a match being billed as 'The Final One' against close friend and 23-time grand slam champion Williams at the Royal Arena in Copenhagen on May 18.

Wozniacki, an Australian Open champion in 2018, said she had "accomplished everything I could ever dream of on the court" in her retirement announcement last Friday.

The decision, which she insisted was not related to being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, came at the end of a difficult campaign where she fell to a year-end position of 37 in the WTA world rankings.

Williams and Wozniacki have met 11 times previously, with the American winning on 10 occasions, though they have not played since the WTA Finals in 2014.

Caroline Wozniacki, a former world number one on the WTA Tour, has announced she will retire from professional tennis following next month's Australian Open.

In a lengthy Instagram post on Friday, the 29-year-old Dane, who claimed grand slam glory at Melbourne Park in 2018, said she had "accomplished everything I could ever dream of on the court".

Last year, Wozniacki revealed she had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, an auto-immune disease that causes swelling of the joints and fatigue.

However, she insisted her retirement was not due to health reasons, but rather her desire to focus on a series of matters away from tennis.

"I've played professionally since I was 15 years old," Wozniacki wrote. "In that time, I've experienced an amazing first chapter of my life. With 30 WTA singles titles, a world #1 ranking of 71 weeks, a WTA Finals victory, 3 Olympics [appearances], including carrying the flag for my native Denmark, and winning the 2018 Australian Open grand slam championship, I've accomplished everything I could ever dream of on the court.

"I've always told myself, when the time comes, that there are things away from tennis that I want to do more, then it's time to be done.

"In recent months, I've realised that there is a lot more in life that I'd like to accomplish off the court. Getting married to David [Lee, the former NBA star] was one of those goals and starting a family with him while continuing to travel the world and helping raise awareness about rheumatoid arthritis [project upcoming] are all passions of mine moving forward.

"So with that, today I am announcing that I will be retiring from professional tennis after the Australian Open in January. This has nothing to do with my health and this isn't a goodbye, I look forward to sharing my exciting journey ahead with all of you!"

"Finally, I want to thank with all my heart, the fans, my friends, my sponsors, my team, especially my father as my coach, my husband, and my family for decades of support! Without all of you I could have never have done this!"

A Melbourne swansong represents a fitting finale for Wozniacki, given the city played host to her greatest triumph.

Having twice suffered the pain of defeat in a grand slam final, at the 2009 and 2014 US Opens, Wozniacki ended her long wait with a gutsy three-set victory over Simona Halep that took close to three hours.

Her tally of 71 weeks as world number one is the ninth-highest total on the WTA Tour since the inception of computer rankings.

Wozniacki last topped the rankings following her 2018 Australian Open win, but she ended this year 38th on the list, her trademark court-covering ability seemingly compromised by her rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis.

Caroline Wozniacki, a former world number one on the WTA Tour, has announced she will retire from professional tennis following next month's Australian Open.

Carla Suarez Navarro has announced the 2020 WTA season will be the last of her career.

The former world number six is a seven-time grand slam quarter-finalist and has won two WTA singles titles in her career.

Suarez Navarro reached the final of the doubles at the WTA Finals in 2015 alongside Spanish compatriot Garbine Muguruza, suffering defeat to Martina Hingis and Sania Mirza.

The 31-year-old is ranked 55th in the world, having won 18 of her 36 matches in 2019, a year in which she reached the fourth round at Wimbledon before losing to Serena Williams in straight sets.

"The 2020 season will be my last year in the professional tennis circuit," said Suarez Navarro. "The sport has been a fundamental part of my life - it has given me immense joy and I cannot be more grateful for all the experiences that it has allowed me to live.

"At this time, I notice that the time has come to complete a beautiful chapter and begin to enjoy other areas of life. Tennis will always be in me.

"Tennis right now has a very high demand. To be high in the ranking you need absolute consistency, a world-class level of physical conditioning and a 24-hour daily psychological commitment.

"I have been in high competition for more than 15 years and have lived through these realities since the beginning of my adolescence. These are lessons that have formed me as a person and that will serve me for a lifetime.

"I want to enjoy one last season with the same professionalism as always. I am going to do a quality preparation, my whole team is going to travel with me from the month of January and I plan to compete until the end of the season. My desire is clear: to be proud of this last effort when I reach the end of the road."

World number two Karolina Pliskova has appointed Dani Vallverdu as her new coach for the 2020 season.

The Czech recently split with Conchita Martinez just six months after appointing the Spaniard on a full-time basis, having also worked with Rennae Stubbs.

Pliskova has now turned to Vallverdu, who has coached the likes of Andy Murray, Juan Martin del Potro and Stan Wawrinka, as she eyes an elusive first grand slam title.

The 27-year-old hopes the Venezuelan can take her game to another level next year in what will be his first experience of coaching on the WTA Tour.

"He was one of my priorities from the beginning. He's had great results with his players, he understands tennis like hardly anyone else and I'm convinced he has a lot to offer to me," she said of the Venezuelan.

"I'm already looking forward to the start of the preparation."

Former doubles player Olga Savchuk has also joined Pliskova's coaching staff.

 

Coco Gauff will do battle against the likes of Serena Williams and Bianca Andreescu on the first week of the new WTA Tour season after signing up to play in the Auckland Open.

The 15-year-old sensation is limited in the number of tournaments she can play before turning 16 but has opted to play the WTA International event in New Zealand.

Gauff won her first senior title at the Linz Open last month and will use the Auckland tournament, which begins on January 6, as part of her preparation for the Australian Open.

US Open finalists Andreescu and Williams are also scheduled to be part of the field, meaning Gauff could meet either during the tournament, along with two-time defending champion Julia Goerges.

Gauff's success this year included a famous run to the fourth round of Wimbledon, where she became the youngest player in the Open era to come through the qualifying rounds to reach the main draw. Her exploits helped to secure a year-end ranking of 68.

She told the tournament website: "I can’t wait to start my season in Auckland. 2019 was such an incredible year and I achieved so many of the goals that I had set for myself. Wimbledon was obviously a highlight as was capturing my first WTA title.

"So many players talk about Auckland. I have not been before so this will be cool to experience."

Two-time grand slam champion Garbine Muguruza has reunited with coach Conchita Martinez for the 2020 season.

Spaniard Muguruza was in the market for a new coach after splitting with Sam Sumyk in July.

The former world number one had Martinez in her corner when she won a second major title at Wimbledon in 2017, when Sumyk took time out for the birth of his daughter.

Martínez was available after she recently finished working with Karolina Pliskova and the 1994 Wimbledon champion has now been employed by her compatriot Muguruza.

"Garbine and I will work together in the 2020 season. With new challenges and enthusiasm." Martinez tweeted on Saturday.

Muguruza has dropped to 35th in the rankings after winning just one title in Monterrey last season.

 

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