Colombia's Wimbledon and US Open doubles champion Robert Farah was formally placed on provisional suspension on Tuesday following his positive test for a banned steroid.

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) said the top-ranked men's doubles player had not exercised his right to contend why he should not be temporarily prevented from competing.

Farah and the ITF had confirmed the positive out-of-competition test on January 14, when it was revealed the sample was taken on October 17, 2019, and contained the steroid Bolderone.

He is not entered in the ongoing Australian Open and has blamed the positive test on contaminated meat, with Boldenone frequently used by Colombian farmers to boost growth in cows.

As a matter of procedure, Farah has now been put under the mandatory suspension pending a hearing to resolve the case.

The ITF issued a statement that said: "Robert Farah has been provisionally suspended under article 8.3.1(c) of the 2019 Tennis Anti-Doping Programme, pending determination of the charge against him at a full hearing..."

It added: "Mr Farah had (and retains) the right to apply to the chair of the independent tribunal convened to hear his case why the provisional suspension should not be imposed, but has chosen not to exercise that right to date."

Farah, who turned 33 on Monday, partnered his fellow Colombian Juan Sebastian Cabal to last year's two grand slam wins.

Robert Farah, the world's number one ranked male doubles player, tested positive for a banned substance in October.

A winner of Wimbledon and the US Open alongside Colombian compatriot Juan Sebastian Cabal in 2019, Farah and the ITF confirmed the positive out-of-competition test on Tuesday.

Farah had already pulled out of the Australian Open, citing "personal reasons".

"The Tennis Anti-Doping Programme can confirm that Robert Farah provided an Out-of-Competition sample on 17 October 2019, which returned a positive finding for Boldenone," a tweet from the ITF's media account read. 

"This case will follow the procedures set out in Article 8 of the TADP."

Farah blamed the positive sample on contaminated meat. Boldenone is a steroid banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), but it is frequently used by Colombian farmers to boost growth in cows.

"I'm sure that's what generated the result from the test in question," Farah said in a statement released on his social media accounts.

"I'm going through one of the saddest moments of my life and, without a doubt, the saddest of my sporting career.

"With my team and a group of advisers we're looking into the steps to take in a process in which we hope to show that I've never used any products that violate fair play and ethics."

News of Farah's positive test comes after the ITF revealed Nicolas Jarry, the world number 78 in singles, failed a test at the Davis Cup in November, his sample containing traces of Ligandrol and Stanozolol.

Rafael Nadal will unquestionably go down as one of the greatest tennis players of all time, and another of the sport's legends was honoured at the US Open before his semi-final.

The man known as Rocket Rod received recognition for a feat no player has been able to replicate, before taking in Nadal's straight-sets win over Matteo Berrettini.

Nadal set up a final with Daniil Medvedev, who defeated Grigor Dimitrov, but the winner of their clash will have to go some way to match the celebrations that marked the end of the men's doubles showpiece.

Omnisport's man on the ground, Nicholas McGee, provides the details in our daily diary from New York.

 

GOOD WEATHER FOR DUCKS

Very little play was possible on the outside courts as heavy rain persisted throughout day 12.

Those dressed for warmer weather may have needed to make an emergency purchase to stay dry.

Thankfully the US Open shop has plenty of options for those needing to wrap up.

It is said rain is good weather for ducks and there are plenty of the rubber variety on offer for those looking to make the bizarre move of adding tennis memorabilia to their bathroom.

FARAH AND CABAL GO BACK TO BACK

Robert Farah and Juan Sebastian Cabal secured back-to-back grand slam titles at Arthur Ashe Stadium as the Colombian men's doubles team overcame Marcel Granollers and Horacio Zeballos 6-4 7-5.

The crowd was filled with fans wearing Colombia national football team jerseys, who greeted the pair claiming match point with a huge roar.

Farah is expecting wilder celebrations when they return to their homeland, telling a post-match media conference: "The way Colombia received us when we came back from Wimbledon was really breathtaking. I don't even want to think about how crazy it's gonna be now that we come back from the US Open.

"I think that back-to-back is quite an achievement, and we just have to say, thank you, Colombia, for all that support and the good vibes they always give us. We are very happy to represent our country in the way that we are doing it."

ROCKET ROD HONOURED

Rod Laver has been in attendance throughout the tournament at Flushing Meadows, and on Friday the 50th anniversary of his second Grand Slam was celebrated.

Laver is the only man in history to win the calendar Grand Slam twice, his second coming at the 1969 US Open.

To honour that incredible achievement, Laver was presented with a replica of the US Open trophy and then with a plaque from representatives of all four major tournaments as the Arthur Ashe crowd came to its feet to show its appreciation for Rocket Rod.

Robert Farah and Juan Sebastian Cabal spoke of the intense bond that helped them through their epic men's doubles final at Wimbledon on Saturday.

The Colombian pair eventually got the better of Nicolas Mahut and Edouard Roger-Vasselin in a five-set thriller that spanned almost five hours on Centre Court, causing the women's doubles final to be put back until Sunday.

Tie-breaks were needed to decide the first four sets before Cabal and Farah won the fifth 6-3, both men falling to the turf with elation and exhaustion in equal measure.

After becoming the first Colombians to win a men's grand slam doubles crown, Farah and Cabal faced the media and discussed the close nature of their friendship.

"I think we've been friends, almost brothers, since we're five," Farah said. "We literally grew up together.

"We were sponsored by Colsanitas since we were 10, 11. Grew up together in a house. That gives you a strong bond.

"And obviously Sebas and I, since I left college in 2010, we said, 'Let's play together'. We had played before I went to college. It worked out from the beginning. It clicked.

"I know Sebas has the touch, has the magic in his hands. I have the power. I feel like that's a very good duo.

"It's great to live this with your brother, your brother like from another mother. It's like a cliche, but it's really what it is."

On lifting their trophies in the Royal Box, Farah added: "Not every day the whole royalty of the UK is watching you play tennis. I mean, it's just indescribable. That court is just magical.

"I don't have any other words to describe that court. I mean, the whole history that court has is just crazy. To think you grew up watching it, now you're winning in it, just becomes even more magical."

Mahut was struck by the ball three times during the course of the match, including twice in successive points, but Cabal insisted such incidents were part and parcel of playing doubles.

"Obviously you apologise," he said. "It's two versions of hitting the other guy. Today it was a play. It wasn't bad intentions. In the whole match we hit them, they hit us.

"It's doubles, that's it. That's why if you can see it, every time we hit each other, it was like good environment, good, fair play. Everything was good. No bad looks or anything."

An absolutely epic Wimbledon men's doubles final was eventually won by Robert Farah and Juan Sebastian Cabal as Nicolas Mahut and Edouard Roger-Vasselin were defeated after almost five hours on Centre Court.

After the opening four sets all went to tie-breaks, Colombian duo Farah and Cabal gained an advantage in the fifth and ultimately prevailed 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (8-6) 6-7 (5-7) 6-3.

The match lasted four hours and 57 minutes while there was a delay when the roof was closed prior to the deciding set, and a finish of around 21:00 local time meant the scheduled women's doubles final had to be postponed until Sunday, after Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer's men's singles showdown.

Defeat will bring back painful memories for Mahut, who famously lost 70-68 to John Isner in the final set of his first-round singles encounter at the All England Club in 2010 – the longest match in the sport's history.

His partner Roger-Vasselin was in tears at the end and Mahut will be hurting in more ways than one after being struck three times during Saturday's absorbing final in front of a captivated crowd.

The Frenchman required lengthy treatment after taking a blow to the forehead early in proceedings and was hit twice in successive points in the final set – once in the neck and then again in a more sensitive area.

And he was unable to console himself with victory as Farah and Cabal became the first men from their country to win a grand slam doubles crown, both collapsing to the turf in delight as the championship point – the 419th point of the match – went their way.

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