Borussia Dortmund sensation Youssoufa Moukoko faced racist abuse from opposition fans as he scored a hat-trick in an under-19 derby against Schalke on Sunday.

The Cameroon-born 15-year-old has been widely tipped to move into Dortmund's first-team squad when he becomes eligible to play senior football on his 16th birthday, which is coming up on November 20.

Alongside the elation of guiding his team to a 3-2 away victory, Moukoko was also goaded with abuse from Schalke supporters that was condemned by the Gelsenkirchen club.

In a statement released on Twitter, Schalke said: "We can only apologise for the behaviour of some of our fans towards Youssoufa Moukoko at today's U19s match.

"Derby emotions aside, we completely condemn and oppose such insults."

Schalke said the club and their fan department would "take the necessary measures", adding the hashtag #NoToRacism to their tweet. A crowd of 290 was in attendance at Schalke's Parkstadion.

Dortmund sit top of the A-Juniors Bundesliga West, with Moukoko scoring the opener on Sunday in the 10th minute, before impressive strikes in the 40th and 62nd minutes put his team in control.

Andre Villas-Boas has expressed alarm that Alvaro Gonzalez and his family received abuse including death threats after Marseille's win at Paris Saint-Germain.

Spanish defender Alvaro was involved in the stormy ending to Sunday's Classique, with Neymar sent off for striking him on the back of the head as five players were red-carded in stoppage time.

Neymar explained the incident by alleging he was subjected to a racial slur, saying on Twitter that his only regret was not hitting his opponent in the face.

Marseille are standing by their player, insisting he is not racist and stressing he has the support of team-mates. Alvaro denies making such a slur.

The south-coast club announced on Monday that the leaking of private telephone numbers belonging to Alvaro and his relatives led to "constant harassment, consisting in particular of death threats".

Speaking in a news conference on Tuesday, head coach Villas-Boas said: "The death threats are true. We told the police about them.

"These are the consequences of the accusations. I hope it will end soon."

The pair exchanged messages on Twitter after the game, with Neymar telling Alvaro he has no respect for him.

Villas-Boas appears to want Neymar to retract his accusation, which may be unlikely given how strongly the Brazilian expressed his views initially and has since stood by them.

The Marseille boss urged Neymar considering the consequences of his allegations towards Alvaro.

"We are sure that Alvaro is not racist," Villas-Boas said, according to L'Equipe.

"OM represents multiculturality. I think that we will all help to seek the truth.

"It is not good for Alvaro. It is a sensitive subject. OM and PSG are there to help seek the truth."

Paris Saint-Germain have given their full backing to Neymar after he accused Marseille defender Alvaro of racially abusing him and have called for a full investigation to be launched.

Brazil superstar Neymar was one of five players sent off amid an ugly fracas at the end of Sunday's Classique, which Marseille won 1-0 at the Parc des Princes.

A VAR check showed Neymar striking Alvaro on the back of the head and he later posted on Twitter to say his only regret was not hitting his opponent in the face after alleging he was subjected to a racial slur.

Alvaro denied the claims with his own post on social media, to which Neymar responded angrily.

PSG want French Football's governing body the Ligue de Football Professionnel (LFP) to look into the allegations and said in a statement on their website: "Paris Saint-Germain strongly supports Neymar Jr, who reported being subjected to racist abuse by an opposing player.

"The club restates that there is no place for racism in society, in football or in our lives and calls on everyone to speak out against all forms of racism throughout the world.

"For more than 15 years the club has been strongly committed to the fight against all forms of discrimination alongside its partners SOS Racisme, Licra and Sportitude.

"Paris Saint-Germain looks forward to the LFP's Disciplinary Commission to investigate and ascertain the facts, and the club remains at the LFP's disposal for any assistance required."

On many a Sunday, I realize that people have looked at the stories they've seen throughout the week with different lenses. I have my own personal take on some of these issues and I will share them with you. Welcome to #INCASEYOUMISSEDIT

 1. Best of luck ladies! Stay safe!

The West Indies Women are set to face England in five Vitality International T20 matches at the Incora County Ground, Derby in September. I commend Cricket West Indies for ensuring our women cricketers are afforded an equal opportunity to play the sport they love despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

CWI have agreed to follow the strict medical protocols that were implemented for the West Indies Men’s tour to England earlier this year. The players and staff will remain in a bio-secure environment for the duration of the tour, with all matches being played behind closed doors.

In an interview with Windies captain Stefanie Taylor regarding the restart of cricket she said, “I’m excited for the restart because we’ve been away for a long time. Barring injury, this is probably the longest I have been away from the game. I know the rest of the team are also excited to get back out on the field.”

When asked about the biosecure measures put in place Stefanie said, “I am confident with the bio-secure environment. I saw how well it worked for the last two series in England and knowing we’ll have the same level of biosecurity, I’m comfortable with the protocols in place.”

Another Windies player that I contacted regarding the restart of women’s cricket Britney Cooper said, “It’s always a privilege to be selected for West Indies. I am looking forward to this series since we’ve been away for so long. Also, it’s an opportunity to restart since we didn’t have the best World Cup earlier this year.”

I am incredibly pleased with the efforts of CWI to ensure our Windies women play competitive cricket despite the ongoing pandemic. Best of luck ladies and most importantly stay safe.

 2. Continue blazing a trail Bravo. Congratulations!

Dwayne Bravo has always been one of my favourite cricketers because of his efforts on the field. There is something special about having Bravo in your team that gives you confidence that you can turn any match around no matter the situation. I enjoy the energy that he brings to the sport and the fact that in each game he gives his 100 per cent. Congratulations Champion, on becoming the first bowler to take 500 wickets in all Twenty20 cricket.

Bravo has played for 21 different teams, played alongside 400 different teammates, against over 1200 opponents and dismissed 312 different batsmen. He has now achieved a new milestone 500 wickets, over 100 more than Lasith Malinga.

What I find most intriguing about Bravo is the impact that he has in T20s. His ability to bowl at different stages of an innings, especially at the death overs is incredible. The Trinidadian is the type of player that can change a game with both bat and ball. However, we cannot fail to mention his fielding brilliance. I celebrate you, champion, keep blazing your trail!

3. The postponement of the NBA games- A powerful statement.

Since the restart of the NBA, the players have continued to bring attention to the Black Lives Matter movement. They have shared their own stories. They continue to wear “Black Lives Matter” T-shirts. They have locked arms and kneeled during the anthem. However, after the latest shooting of an unarmed black man, Jacob Blake, in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the players did the most meaningful thing they could do: they refused to play.

By refusing to play the players made a profound statement. They withheld the only thing many fans and many Americans see when they look at them: their talent. They called on authorities to take accountability for what was taking place. The main question being asked now is, “Will the authorities finally listen to the pleas of these players and create change?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An emotional Chris Paul praised the "huge" work of his NBA colleagues and said he will never forget the meetings that followed the Milwaukee Bucks' strike this week.

The Bucks refused to take the court against the Orlando Magic in Game 5 of their first-round series after the shooting of Jacob Blake.

Blake, a black man, was repeatedly shot in the back by police in the team's home state of Wisconsin.

The incident prompted the latest in a series of demonstrations against police brutality and racial inequality, with all playoff games on Wednesday and Thursday subsequently postponed.

A return to action was agreed for Saturday but only after the 13 teams present in Orlando held lengthy meetings to discuss a route forward.

Resumption plans came with commitments from the league that placed a particular emphasis upon enabling voter participation in the 2020 general election this November.

Oklahoma City Thunder point guard Paul had a key role, as the NBPA president, and told the media of his pride at the meetings while again describing his pain.

"Fifteen years in this league and I've never seen a thing like it," Paul said. "Honestly.

"I wasn't the oldest one in the room - I think Udonis Haslem was - but the voices that were heard, I'll never forget it, I'll never forget it.

"For a lot of us, you get a chance to read and see pictures of the Cleveland Summit, those who came before us, the Muhammad Alis, the Jim Browns, the Kareem Abdul-Jabbars, and how powerful they were.

"We're not saying that we're that, but what we're doing in our league right now is huge.

"I think for the young guys in our league, they get a chance to see how guys are really coming together and speaking and see real change, real action.

"Because guys are tired. Like, I mean, tired. When I say 'tired,' we're not physically tired, we're just tired of seeing the same thing over and over again, right?

"I was blessed and fortunate enough to talk to Jacob Blake's father - he was in my home state of Winston-Salem for a while - and it's emotional, especially when you're a black man.

"You know that when [Bucks star] George Hill spoke, he talked about being a black man and he was hurt. He was hurt. We're all hurt.

"We're all tired of just seeing the same thing over and over again and everybody just expects us to be okay, just because we get paid great money. You know, we're human. We have real feelings.

"And I'm glad that we got the chance to get in a room together to talk with one another and not just cross paths and say, 'good luck in your game today'."

Doc Rivers lauded the "phenomenal" NBA players after they agreed a return to action following the Milwaukee Bucks' strike, a pause in play the Los Angeles Clippers coach felt was vital.

Games on Wednesday and Thursday were postponed after the Bucks decided to sit out of Game 5 of their first-round series against the Orlando Magic.

The demonstration was made in protest against police brutality and racial inequality after Jacob Blake, a black man, was repeatedly shot in the back by police in Milwaukee's home state of Wisconsin.

As the Bucks' stance garnered support around the league, initial reports from the NBA bubble in Orlando suggested the season could be halted as a result.

But the NBA and NBPA have announced plans to return on Saturday based on commitments from the league that placed a particular emphasis upon enabling voter participation in the 2020 general election this November.

Clippers coach Rivers, who was praised for his emotional words on Blake's shooting earlier this week, told reporters following confirmation of the resumption plans: "The players were phenomenal.

"I was fortunate enough that they invited me to sit in on meetings and, just as a fly on the wall, I was so impressed with them. At the meeting last night, I was really impressed."

Support of Black Lives Matter has been a constant since the NBA season returned amid the coronavirus pandemic, with the death of George Floyd in police custody in May bringing the movement to the fore.

Citing Floyd's final words as a police officer knelt on his neck - "I can't breathe" - Rivers felt it was important the players had time after the Bucks' unprecedented strike to consider a route forward with their aims for social change.

"Just because something hasn't happened doesn't mean it can't happen," he explained. "Don't give into something that hasn't happened. Keep pushing, keep working.

"The key to this thing is that I think we all needed to take a breath. We needed a moment to breathe.

"It's not lost on me that George Floyd didn't get that moment. But we did, and we took it, and the players took it.

"And they got to refocus on the things that they wanted to focus on outside of their jobs.

"Then they voiced it, they organised it, they got it together, they understood they can't do everything on their own. We all need help to get things done. They went out and they got that help as well.

"The pride to be in the NBA is very high for me. I slept very well last night, thinking that our young people spoke. That was fantastic."

Milos Raonic has called on the ATP and WTA tours to "band together" in the fight against racial inequality and social injustice, believing stronger action is required,

All three NBA playoff games scheduled to take place on Wednesday were postponed amid protests following the shooting of Jacob Blake, a black man, by police in the state of Wisconsin.

Other sports followed suit: MLB saw three games postponed, while five of the six scheduled MLS fixtures also did not go ahead. In tennis, Naomi Osaka withdrew from the Western and Southern Open, a move she hopes "can get a conversation started in a majority white sport".

The United States Tennis Association, along with the ATP and WTA, which run men's and women's tennis, announced there would be no play in the tournament in New York on Thursday, with the semi-finals moved to Friday instead.

Canadian Raonic, who is due to play Stefanos Tsitsipas in the last four, offered his support, insisting previous steps taken "can only do so much".

The world number 30 also made clear he believes the time has come to make a stand in a way that has financial implications, what he described as "real disruption".

"I think having a sign somewhere, of support, banners at a tournament or wearing a shirt in a warmup at an NBA game, it can only do so much," Raonic told the media.

"I think real disruption ... that's what makes change. I think real disruption is caused by affecting people in a monetary way. And that can cause some kind of change.

"And I'm hoping with what the NBA does, and I'm hoping that we at least on the men's tour as well as the women's [tour], we band together and show our support because there are many people that are not being treated fairly, are being disrespected, having to live in fear and a lot of things that I've never had to experience.

"It's very unfortunate, it's very sad, and I'm hoping that there is a change, I'm hoping that the actions that do take course, over the next days, weeks, months, years, this isn't going to change in a day, but really do provide a change, systematic change, equal opportunity for everybody, especially in the free world."

Osaka released a statement on Twitter confirming she would not be participating in her semi-final against Elise Mertens, explaining there were "more important matters at hand that need immediate attention, rather than watching me play tennis".

"I don't expect anything drastic to happen with me not playing, but if I can get a conversation started in a majority white sport I consider that a step in the right direction," the two-time major winner wrote.

"Watching the continued genocide of Black people at the hand of police is honestly making me sick to my stomach. I'm exhausted of having a new hashtag pop up every few days and I'm extremely tired of having this same conversation over and over again.

"When will it ever be enough? #JacobBlake, #BreonnaTaylor, #ElijahMcclain, #GeorgeFloyd."

Barack Obama, Billie Jean King and LeBron James led rallying calls on a seismic day in American sport, as games were called off in protest at racial injustice.

In a forceful message, athletes and teams downed tools in North America as they boycotted scheduled fixtures following the shooting of Jacob Blake, a black man, by police in the state of Wisconsin.

Blake was shot several times in the back, prompting nationwide protests.

All three NBA playoff games set for Wednesday were postponed, and it was reported widely that players from the Los Angeles Clippers and the Los Angeles Lakers were in favour of boycotting the rest of the season.

The NBA board of governors were set for a Thursday meeting, with players also reportedly due to hold a follow-up to their Wednesday get-together.

Major League Baseball saw three games postponed, namely those between the Milwaukee Brewers and Cincinnati Reds, Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants, and Seattle Mariners and San Diego Padres.

Five of six Major League Soccer games also did not go ahead, while Thursday's play at the Western and Southern Open tennis tournament in New York was suspended, with Naomi Osaka pulling out of the tournament after reaching the semi-finals.

Former US president Obama saluted the Milwaukee Bucks for boycotting Game 5 in their series against the Orlando Magic.

Milwaukee is the nearest major city to Kenosha, where Blake was shot. Obama also saluted Clippers coach Doc Rivers, who criticised President Donald Trump when he spoke powerfully on Tuesday. Rivers accused the Republican Party of "spewing this fear".

Obama wrote on Twitter: "I commend the players on the @Bucks for standing up for what they believe in, coaches like @DocRivers, and the @NBA and @WNBA for setting an example. It's going to take all our institutions to stand up for our values."

Speaking earlier in the day, Lakers superstar James wrote on Twitter: "F*** THIS MAN!!!! WE DEMAND CHANGE. SICK OF IT".

Clippers owner Steve Ballmer added: "I am again angry over the shooting of a black man #JacobBlake. @DocRivers and The @Bucks players said it well, we need real police accountability. Give citizens data to do so. Let's have criminal justice reform that keeps all people safe but not senselessly imprisoned or afraid."

Tennis great King, who has fought for the growth of women's sport and for social justice, praised Japanese player Osaka's decision to abandon the Western and Southern Open in her individual protest.

King wrote: "A brave and impactful move by @naomiosaka, in support of the protest movement moving through the sports world. She was to play in the semis. Athletes using platforms for good means so much. Don't remain silent. #BlackLivesMatter"

Fellow tennis Hall of Famer Martina Navratilova added: "An amazing stance Naomi ... well done, nothing but respect!!!"

The NHL faced criticism, however, for a perceived lack of response as the Stanley Cup playoffs continue.

Canadian star Evander Kane, who plays for the San Jose Sharks, tore into the league by saying: "Actually it's incredibly insulting as a black man in hockey the lack of action and acknowledgement from the @nhl, just straight up insulting."

FC Dallas have strongly condemned "repulsive and unacceptable" racist comments and death threats Reggie Cannon has been subjected to this week. 

Dallas defender Cannon criticised supporters who booed players for kneeling during the national anthem before his side returned to MLS action against Nashville on Wednesday.  

Some fans were allowed into the game, which started after the teams showed their support of the Black Lives Matter movement. 

Sportsmen and women have taken a knee worldwide since NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick became the first to do so in the 2016 season, protesting against police brutality and racial inequality. 

But jeers were heard among supporters as Dallas, Nashville and the officials took a knee, with a water bottle also appearing to be thrown on the field in response. 

Dallas chairman Clark Hunt and president Dan Hunt says the abuse United States international Cannon has come in for will not be tolerated. 

"We want to be clear: We love and support Reggie Cannon. The racist comments and death threats he has received are repulsive and unacceptable," a statement from the duo said. 

"There is no place in our sport, or in our country for that matter, for the kind of horrific vitriol Reggie has had to endure today. Hateful or violent threats are never warranted – especially when they are directed toward a member of our FC Dallas family. 

"We will continue to work together – with our players, our coaches and our fans – against racism and in the cause of equality for all." 

Full-back Cannon said after a 1-0 defeat for Dallas: "I think it was disgusting. I think it was absolutely disgusting.

"You've got fans booing you for people taking a stand for what they believe in, and millions of other people support this cause.

"We discussed with every other team and the league what we were going to do, and we've got fans booing us in our own stadium. How disgraceful is that?

"For a lack of a better word, it p***** me off."

Cannon said the players had asked for the anthem not to be played before the match but "they ignored our wishes".

"We were going to kneel regardless if the anthem was played or not," he explained. "Unfortunately, it was played during the time when we asked for the anthem not to be played."

LeBron James said there has been "no damn movement" for black Americans as he demanded justice for Breonna Taylor.

Superstar James spoke out on racial oppression after appearing for the Los Angeles Lakers in a 108-104 NBA scrimmage defeat to the Dallas Mavericks in Orlando.

In a passionate and erudite assessment of the state of American life, James said he and team-mates were firmly behind the drive for accountability after the shooting in March of African-American woman Taylor.

She died of gunshot wounds after three officers from the Louisville Metro Police Department executed a no-knock search warrant on her Louisville home, resulting in an exchange of fire between her boyfriend and the officers. It has been said by Taylor's family that she and her boyfriend suspected a break-in rather than a police raid.

James, also pointing to the death of George Floyd in police custody, insisted officers should pay for their actions.

"The same energy we had on the floor is the same energy we have toward having justice for Breonna Taylor and her family," he said.

"It's unfortunate. It's fortunate that we had the George Floyd video to see it, but is that what we need to see, a video of Breonna being killed, for people to realise how bad the situation is?

"I don't even believe they were at the right place. The cops weren't even in at the right place. They knocked down the wrong door and started doing what they do at that time and just started shooting away. And that's just not okay."

He added: "We want the cops arrested. Justice for Breonna Taylor is number one on our lists right now."

James spoke of reading about a black man who was trying to buy a bicycle for his son but had police called on him.

“It's just heartbreaking. You guys don't understand," James said. "Unless you're a person of colour, you guys don't understand. I understand you might feel for us. But you will never truly understand what it is to be black in America."

Speaking in a news conference, James also addressed the Black Lives Matter campaign, which has seen a light shone on racial injustices.

"A lot of people use this analogy that Black Lives Matter is a movement. It's not a movement. When you’re black, it's not a movement. It's a lifestyle," he said.

"This is a walk of life. I don't like the word 'movement' because unfortunately in America and in society there ain't been no damn movement for us."

He looked at America's political change, reflecting on how Barack Obama was in charge of the country four years ago. Without naming President Donald Trump, it was clear where James' message was directed.

"You know what's going on now. Is that progress?" he said.

"I think we can all say that’s not progress. The conversations being had right now and how many people are really listening or just having the conversations of trying to make things happen, that's progress. We got a long way to go."

Football must not let its powerful opposition to racism fade into the background, Porto captain Danilo Pereira has warned.

The death of George Floyd in police custody in the United States in May sparked an increase in action by campaigners against police brutality and racial injustice, along with growing support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

It has led to sports including football stepping up efforts to banish discrimination, with prominent action being taken in England's Premier League where the gesture of taking a knee has preceded every match since lockdown ended.

There have been examples of players kneeling in other European leagues, too, following the lead set by NFL star Colin Kaepernick, whose protests during the US national anthem in the 2016 season were criticised by President Donald Trump.

Danilo, who has been linked with a possible move to Arsenal, told Stats Perform News: "I think we should be doing more because sometimes people forget about these things, like, four or five weeks later they forget about this.

"So I think we should do more, because as players we have a lot of influence in other people.

"When we do something big, other people follow us so we could do something more.

"This is a really difficult issue to speak about because some people don't understand what we are talking about, because they think we are only talking about black people.

"But this is not only about black people, it's about every other race in the world, so I think we should do more and also other people should do more."

There is a school of thought that footballers should leave the pitch when racism occurs, with UEFA's three-step protocol designed to tackle the issue.

Danilo, who led Porto to the 2020 Primeira Liga title, says players would be better carrying on amid abuse, suggesting stopping games as a reaction is letting the racists win.

"I think the best way is to continue to play and to score goals," Danilo said. "If you score and if you win the game they will be mad, so this is the best way. But I understand the people who leave the pitch, who have a different reaction – sometimes to shoot the ball into the crowd.

"I think when they shout [at] you they want this reaction from you, to leave the pitch, to be mad. So, for me, if you do that, the people who do that get the reaction they want."

Fast-bowling legend-turned-legendary commentator, Michael Holding, effortlessly threw case studies here and there while backing up his views on the issue of racism.

West Indies fast bowler turned respected commentator, Michael Holding, has over the years developed a reputation for being outspoken. He just tells it like it is. On Wednesday, prior to the start of the #RaiseYourBat Series between the West Indies and England, he was at his best delivering a powerful message against racism.

The fast-bowling great, speaking on Skysports was asked his views on the #BlackLivesMatter campaign, delivered a poignant lesson on how education and religion helped brainwash the world against people of colour.

 “Education is important, unless we just want to continue living the life that we are living and continue having demonstrations every now and then and a few people saying a few things,” Holding said.

“When I say education I say going back in history. What people need to understand is that these things stem from a long time ago, hundreds of years ago. The dehumanisation of the black race is where it started. People will tell you that ‘oh it’s a long time ago, get over it’. No, you don’t get over things like that.”

He mentioned another recent incident in the United States that brought into stark focus, just how ingrained racism has become.

“That lady in central park in New York (Amy Cooper). If she did not have in her DNA the thought process that she is white and this man is black and ‘if I call a police officer, nine times out of 10 he is going to be white and I will be considered right immediately. The black guy will have to prove that he is not guilty and by the time he has to prove that he might be dead,” Holding remarked.

“She had that in her mind from day one and that is why she said and did what she did. How do you get rid of that in society? By educating both black and white.”

Highlighting that he was not much of a religious person, Holding said that religion has brainwashed much of the world against people of colour.

“As a young man I didn’t understand what brainwashing is; now I do. We have been brainwashed. Even white people have been brainwashed,” Holding said.

“I go back many years, think about religion. You and I both are Christians. Look at Jesus Christ. The image that they give of Jesus Christ, pale skin, blonde hair, blue eyes. Where Jesus came from, who in that part of the world looks that way? Again, that is brainwashing, this is to show, ‘look this is what perfection is, this is what the image of perfection is.’

“If you look at the plays of those days. Judas, who betrayed Jesus, is a black man. Again brainwashing people to think, ‘oh he is a black man, he is the bad man’.”

He also spoke about how those recording history have deliberately ignored achievements by people of African heritage.

“We all know who invented the light bulb. Thomas Edison invented it. Edison invented the light bulb with a paper filament; it burnt out in no time at all. Can you tell me who invented the filament that makes these lights shine throughout? Nobody knows because he was a black man and it was not taught in schools. Lewis Howard Latimer invented the carbon filament because of which lights continuously shine, who knows that?” he asked.

 “Everything should be taught. When I go back I remember my school days, I was never taught anything good about black people. And you cannot have a society that is brought up like that, both whites and blacks, which is only taught what is convenient to the teacher.”

Bernie Ecclestone is sure he will clear the air with Lewis Hamilton over controversial remarks made by Formula One's ex-supremo, even if he felt the world champion "sounded off a little bit maybe without thinking".

Hamilton called out comments made by Ecclestone in a CNN interview this week in which he suggested there were "lots of cases" where black people were more racist than white people, and said in F1 he doubted whether there was "any concern" about the issue as a whole.

F1 issued a statement condemning the remarks, which were branded "ignorant and uneducated" by Hamilton.

Ecclestone later attempted to clarify his comments to The Mail on Sunday, saying "I was not against anyone who was black" and "it's not my fault I'm white".

In an interview with GPFans.com, Ecclestone was asked if he had any regrets over the remarks to CNN, to which he replied: "The only real regret, I suppose, is that I didn't make myself clearer about some black people also being racist.

"There's no doubt about it they've probably good reason to be. I don't know why black people are singled out at times. There's a reason for it and I don't know what it is.

"The remark I made, I'm sorry it wasn't taken in the way I was meaning it to be taken."

Ecclestone is sure he will speak with Hamilton again, adding: "I'm sure we will. I'm absolutely sure we will.

"He sort of sounded off a little bit maybe without thinking, and he might have been in a mood where he thought he ought to say something."

Hamilton has set up a commission to increase diversity in motorsport, while F1 announced on Thursday the details of a new task force and foundation with the same aim.

Lewis Hamilton believes Bernie Ecclestone's comments on racism show why Formula One failed to address the issue in the past.

Former F1 boss Ecclestone, 89, suggested in a CNN interview that little could be done about diversity in the sport during his time in charge.

Ecclestone said there were "lots of cases" where black people were more racist than white people, and said in Formula One he doubted whether there was "any concern" about the issue as a whole.

Six-time champion Hamilton branded the remarks "ignorant and uneducated" after F1 issued a statement to condemn them.

"I just don't even know where to start with this one. So sad and disappointing to read these comments," Hamilton wrote on Instagram.

"Bernie is out of the sport and a different generation but this is exactly what is wrong – ignorant and uneducated comments which show us how far we as a society need to go before real equality can happen.

"It makes complete sense to me now that nothing was said or done to make our sport more diverse or to address the racial abuse I received throughout my career.

"If someone who has run the sport for decades has such a lack of understanding of the deep rooted issues we as black people deal with every day, how can we expect all the people who work under him to understand. It starts at the top.

"Now the time has come for change. I will not stop pushing to create an inclusive future for our sport with equal opportunity for all.

"To create a world that provides equal opportunity for minorities. I will continue to use my voice to represent those who don’t have one, and to speak for those who are underrepresented to provide an opportunity to have a chance in our sport."

Hamilton then shared photos from pre-season testing at Barcelona in 2008, when a group of spectators in blackface wore tops with 'Hamilton's family' written on them.

He added: "I remember this like it was yesterday. The damage things like this do to people is unacceptable."

Hamilton has set up a commission to increase diversity in motorsport, while F1 announced on Thursday the details of a new task force and foundation with the same aim.

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