Mohammad Hafeez has been placed in self-isolation on the eve of Pakistan's second Test with England after breaching bio-security protocols by posing for a photo with a member of the public.

The picture, taken on the golf course adjacent to the on-site hotel at the Ageas Bowl, was posted on the Pakistan all-rounder's Twitter page on Wednesday.

The course is part of Pakistan's bio-secure bubble but interaction with others is not permitted as per social distancing rules and former skipper Hafeez, who is not a part of the Test squad but there for the limited-overs leg of the tour, must now await the results of a fresh coronavirus test.

Pakistan said in a statement: "As it was evident from the photograph that Hafeez had breached the two-metre social distancing protocol and following a consultation process with the team doctor, the team management has decided to isolate him until he returns a negative Covid-19 test.

"Hafeez underwent the Covid-19 test late Wednesday afternoon and the result is expected at some stage on Thursday. The decision to put Hafeez in isolation has been taken for his and, the safety and security of everyone around him.

"The team management believes it was an inadvertent mistake, but a good reminder for everyone on the importance of following the bio-secure protocols, which have been designed for the health and safety of everyone involved in the series.

"The team management has updated the England and Wales Cricket Board of its decision."

Meanwhile, Pakistan have named an unchanged squad for the second Test of their three-match series with England, which they trail 1-0 following an agonising defeat at Old Trafford last week.

The tourists were undone by a stand of 139 between Jos Buttler and Chris Woakes in their first match back in six months because of the coronavirus pandemic, going down to a three-wicket defeat.

Naseem Shah can be a force for Pakistan and trouble batsmen around the world, according to bowling coach Waqar Younis.

The teenager made his Test debut at the age of 16 in last year's series with Australia and bowled faster than Jofra Archer in the first match against England last week.

Naseem took the wicket of Ollie Pope in the first innings and England captain Joe Root in the second innings, though his efforts could not prevent from Pakistan from suffering a three-wicket defeat.

He will attempt to play an instrumental role in the second Test at the Rose Bowl, which starts on Thursday.

And Waqar, whose 373 Test wickets put him second on the all-time list for Pakistan behind Wasim Akram, believes improving his fitness to bowl longer spells is key to Naseem realising his potential.

"He's very talented and he's only 17 years of age, he's still growing but what a talent he is," Waqar told a media conference. 

"I don't think he really bowled as well as expected in the previous game, but he can really bowl well, he can really take the opposition on at times.

"He's one for the future, he's going to get stronger and hopefully get fitter and be able to bowl longer spells and will cause trouble to batsmen around the world."

Asked if Naseem can go on to join him and Akram in the ranks of the Pakistan greats, Waqar replied: "He's young, he's really talented, he's got a very good action, all he needs to do is probably get stronger and fitter.

"Once he gets fitter and bowls more overs, he will definitely be a force for Pakistan in the next coming few years.

"When you talk about becoming a great it's very, very difficult to be sure about anyone.

"Pakistan has over the years produced some really, really quality fast bowlers in the last two and a half/three decades I know.

"If he keeps himself fit and strong and keeps bowling, I'm sure he's got the potential of becoming a very good bowler."

 

Joe Root believes England's first Test win over Pakistan was exactly the sort of victory they need to build on if they have serious designs on becoming the world's best team.

England had their backs against the wall for much of last week at Old Trafford but made a remarkable recovery to win the series opener after Chris Woakes and Jos Buttler led a successful 277-run chase.

Root's side are now preparing for the second match against Pakistan at Southampton, where they can clinch the series and the captain can claim a seventh Test win in succession.

Yet Root did not feel he performed his duties particularly effectively in Manchester, although the match moved the team in the right direction.

"I didn't think I had a very good game last week, to be honest," he told reporters. "I made a few errors, tactical errors, but that can happen from time to time.

"You're not always going to get it right. I think most importantly, it's very clear for the guys how we're looking to play.

"Those messages are consistent and we're seeing improvement week in, week out. That's a really promising sign for the group, and long may that continue.

"Most importantly, we're looking forward, it's not about me, it's not about how many games we win with me as captain, it's about us getting consistently better over a long period of time, looking towards being the number one side in the world.

"If we can maintain that attitude collectively, winning obviously breeds confidence all the time. And people putting in performances like Jos and Wizz [Woakes] did on that final day will breed confidence in the rest of the guys, too.

"The other players, young batters in the team, looking at those two getting the job done, will think, 'I want that to be me next time, I want to be the one stood there at the end having won the game when the heat was on'.

"The more and more we can keep performing like that and keep winning, the quicker I think our development as a side will move forward."

Pakistan will look to capitalise on the "huge loss" of Ben Stokes from the England side by taking advantage of a lighter middle order, says bowling coach Waqar Younis.

Stokes withdrew from the rest of the series, which England lead 1-0 after a three-wicket win at Old Trafford, to travel to New Zealand for family reasons.

The world's top Test all-rounder had initially been limited to the role of specialist batsman for the first Test because of a thigh injury but came on to bowl in the second innings to help England dismiss the tourists for 169 with the wickets of Mohammad Rizwan and Shaheen Shah Afridi.

England improbably chased down 277 to win, though Stokes was not a major factor in that pursuit as he followed a first-innings duck with nine in the second innings.

However, captain Joe Root is under no illusion as to the impact of his absence, telling a media conference: "It's a huge loss for us. For a long period of time, he's been arguably our best player.

"He offers so much in all departments. He's a big leader within the group - vice-captain, as well - and, of course, we'll miss him dearly.

"We're all thinking about him. But it's an opportunity for someone to come in and try to fill those boots.

"That's always exciting for someone to take on that challenge. Whoever gets that responsibility has to try to step up to the plate and trust in their own game to help us hopefully get two up in the series."

Waqar does not necessarily see Stokes' exit from the series as a boost to the tourists given their bowling performance against him.

But with Zak Crawley expected to come into the side, he does see potential for Pakistan to have greater success against England's middle order.

"He's [Stokes] the kind of batsman that takes the game away from you single-handedly at times," said Waqar.

"I wouldn't say it's a boost because of the way we bowled at him in the previous game. I thought we had very clear plans and I think we executed really well.

"Yes he's not around, it's unfortunate for cricket but there's no doubt he's a match-winner. If he's not around, England will probably be a touch light when you talk about the middle order. We're going to talk about it and try to cash in."

James Anderson is set to keep his place in the England team despite a disappointing performance in the first Test against Pakistan last week.

England head to Southampton with a 1-0 lead in the three-match series despite frustration for Anderson at Old Trafford.

The 38-year-old seamer - closing in on 600 Test wickets - returned underwhelming match figures of 1-97 and subsequently fielded questions on whether he was set to retire.

Anderson insisted that was not an option, though, and he has the support of captain Joe Root, who intends to keep faith with England's record Test wicket-taker.

"Jimmy's likely to play," Root told reporters on Wednesday ahead of the second Test, which starts on Thursday. "I can't tell you who else is likely to play.

"The only other player I can guarantee if he's fit and well and doesn't get food poisoning tonight is probably me."

Pressed on Anderson getting an immediate opportunity to bounce back, Root replied: "Wouldn't you give him the opportunity with nearly 600 wickets under his belt?"

The captain, who welcomed "very exciting" Sussex seamer Ollie Robinson to the squad, revealed he had a private conversation with Anderson during the Old Trafford Test.

Having told the veteran to "remember how good a player you are", Root offered a firm defence of his most senior star.

"I think to question Jimmy's ability and his record... do that at your own peril," the skipper said.

"There's a reason he's got so many wickets over such a long period of time. It's because he's a consistent performer. I don't think it'll be long before he's back in the wickets big time.

"It would be very silly for us to write someone like Jimmy off. He's still as dedicated as ever, working very hard at his game, and looking very good in practice.

"I don't think it'll be long before he's got another five-fer next to his name."

He added: "It just shows that even the greats of the game and the greats of English cricket still have those days where it doesn't always come as naturally to you, it doesn't always feel the easiest game in the world.

"You know it can be a struggle sometimes. That's just the way it goes.

"I think with Jimmy, you know it won't be long before he's right back at the top, at the peak of his powers, and I'm very much looking forward to seeing him perform again this week."

Anderson's long-time colleague Stuart Broad had a more prominent role in proceedings with figures of 6-91 in Manchester, yet his send-off of Yasir Shah saw him fined by the match referee, his father Chris.

Root said: "It was disappointing for that to happen. It just shows the frustrations that Test cricket can throw at you sometimes.

"You know how much it means to Stuart, and over the past couple of weeks he's made it clear how much it means for him to play for England and do well. That probably just slightly boiled over.

"I'm sure that was a frosty conversation with his dad at some point last week. But he'll look to move on. He knows he's got to set an example and I can't see that being a major talking point dragging over into this week.

"Ultimately, we want to make sure none of our players are missing games through avoidable incidents like that."

England have included Ollie Robinson in their squad for the second Test with Pakistan as a replacement for Ben Stokes.

Stokes, the world's top Test all-rounder, withdrew from the rest of the series to travel to New Zealand for family reasons.

That has opened the door for Robinson, who has taken 244 first-class wickets in 57 matches.

Batsman Zak Crawley is expected to return to the XI for the contest at the Ageas Bowl, which begins on Thursday.

England are looking to clinch the three-match series after Jos Buttler and Chris Woakes inspired them to a three-wicket win at Old Trafford last week.

 

Squad in fullJoe Root (Captain), James Anderson, Jofra Archer, Dominic Bess, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Zak Crawley, Sam Curran, Ollie Pope, Ollie Robinson, Dom Sibley, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

Jofra Archer has warned it is "unrealistic" to expect him to bowl at 90mph every ball as he told critics the only opinions that interest him are those from within the England dressing room. 

There were questions raised about Archer's pace in the first Test against Pakistan, when he struggled to muster the ferocity that typified his entry into the international arena. 

England are expected to keep faith with Archer for the second match in the series, which begins at Southampton's Rose Bowl on Thursday. 

Captain Joe Root has been supportive, predicting England "will continue to see very special things" from Archer as long as he continues to learn from the ups and downs in his career. 

Archer would love to be bowling consistently at an intimidating speed, but he is more concerned with his overall development. 

"I cannot get away from the fact there is always attention towards the pace I am producing," Archer said in his Daily Mail column. 

"From my perspective, I know I can bowl one or two 90mph deliveries a spell even when not everything is clicking, but to do it every ball, everything has to be working perfectly in unison and you have to be in that perfect, competitive mind frame. 

"Not everything comes together all the time. People look back at my debut performance in the Ashes Test at Lord's last year and expect that kind of display everywhere, but it is unrealistic."

Archer appealed for "more appreciation" of the challenges of fast bowling, and England would not want to push him to strain his body if it meant the Sussex paceman taking any physical risks. 

The Barbados-born quick has 38 wickets in 10 Tests since making his debut against Australia in last year's Ashes, and with James Anderson and Stuart Broad in the twilight of their careers, England are hoping Archer proves an enduring and potent presence in their attack. 

"People will judge you how they want and there are a lot of opinions out there. But I am a 25-year-old fast bowler trying to develop my game and the opinions that matter most to me are the ones of my team-mates," Archer said. 

"As long as Joe Root and my England team-mates are fine, I really don't care what other people are thinking." 

He added that "as long as the people in and around this circle are understanding - and it 100 per cent seems like they are - I am very happy and in a good head space". 

England will not have the option to call up Dan Lawrence for the second Test against Pakistan after the batsman left the squad due to a family bereavement.

The second Test begins at the Rose Bowl on Thursday, with England leading the series 1-0 thanks to a Jos Buttler and Chris Woakes inspired victory at Old Trafford.

However, Joe Root will be without one of his star names in Ben Stokes, who left the bio-secure bubble on Sunday to travel to New Zealand for family reasons.

Though Stokes' place in the side up for grabs, Essex batsman Lawrence will not be selected for his first Test cap after the 23-year-old was granted leave from the squad

Zak Crawley, who played in the first two Tests against West Indies, seems the likely candidate to replace Stokes, with England confirming a replacement for Lawrence would not be selected.

Crawley scored 76 in the second innings of the first Test against the Windies, though he was out for a duck and 11 in his two stays at the crease in the following match.

James Anderson was frustrated with his performance in England's series opener with Pakistan but has no plans to retire from Test cricket just yet. 

England claimed an impressive three-wicket win at Old Trafford, chasing down a target of 277 after their bowlers had helped bring them back into the contest late on day three. 

However, Anderson struggled at his home ground, at times cutting an exasperated figure as he returned match figures of 1-97. 

The seamer admits he struggled for rhythm but, at 38, is focused on rediscovering his best form as he closes in on the milestone of 600 Test wickets. 

Asked on a media conference call on Monday whether he was contemplating retirement amid speculation over his future, Anderson emphatically replied: "Absolutely not. 

"It's been a frustrating week for me personally because I've not bowled very well, I've felt out of rhythm. 

"Probably for the first time in 10 years I got a little bit emotional on the field, started getting frustrated and let that get to me a little bit. 

"It reminded me of when I first started playing, when you get frustrated and a little bit angry then you start trying to bowl quicker and quicker, and that obviously doesn't help on the field. 

"For me, once we get down to Southampton, it is a case of working really hard over the next couple of days, see if there are any technical issues that I can sort out and just try and work hard and hope that I get the nod for the next game, so I can try and show people that I've still got what it takes to play Test cricket." 

 

While once again pointing out his determination to keep on playing, Anderson acknowledged his future could be taken out of his hands by the selectors. 

England are back in action this week, with the second Test against Pakistan beginning on Thursday at the Rose Bowl, and have called up Sussex seamer Ollie Robinson to the squad. 

"I want to keep playing for as long as I possibly can," Anderson said. "If I keep bowling the way I did this week, the opportunity to retire will be taken out of my hands. 

"I'm still hungry to play the game, I think the frustration for me this week is that after just one bad game, whispers go around, and I don't think that is really fair. 

"Something that I have done well throughout my career is deal with the pressure that comes with playing, whether that is pressure of expectation, pressure of the match situation - I feel I've dealt with that pretty well throughout my career. 

"This week I probably didn't do that very well. That is something I need to look at and go away, personally look at that and whether I play in the next game or the game after that or if it is in the winter then whenever I play next, I'm ready to be able to cope with that." 

Ben Stokes will play no further part in England's Test series against Pakistan for family reasons. 

Stokes, who captained the team in Joe Root's absence for the opener against West Indies in July, has featured in all four Tests played on home soil so far this year.

However, the 29-year-old – who has been struggling with an injury which restricted him to just four overs of bowling in the victory over Pakistan in Manchester – will not be available for the next two matches, which take place at the Rose Bowl. 

The all-rounder will instead be heading to New Zealand to spend time with his family, the England and Wales Cricket Board announced in a statement on a Sunday.

In December, Stokes' father, Ged, fell ill while attending England's tour of South Africa. 

While his father recovered in hospital after undergoing three operations, Stokes continued to play on for England, helping clinch a 3-1 series triumph over the Proteas. 

However, England - who went 1-0 up against Pakistan on Saturday - will now be without their vice-captain in Southampton. 

Jos Buttler and Chris Woakes were the heroes as the hosts chased down a target of 277 to secure a three-wicket triumph at Old Trafford.

Joe Root revealed how Ben Stokes' Ashes heroics at Headingley had England always thinking they could defy the odds and beat Pakistan in a thrilling first Test.

The hosts claimed the series opener in Manchester as they chased down a target of 277 on a gripping fourth day's play, despite at one stage slipping to 117-5 in their second innings.

Jos Buttler and Chris Woakes combined to put on a pivotal stand of 139 for the sixth wicket, making 75 and 84 not out respectively as England squeezed home with three wickets to spare.

Stokes contributed just nine on this occasion but his stunning knock against Australia in 2019, when he made 135 not out in a famous one-wicket win, always offers inspiration to his team-mates, according to Root.

"We knew it was going to take something special," England's captain told Sky Sports in the post-match presentation ceremony.

"I think, after last summer, it's very hard to stop believing. We know that anything is possible. 

"One thing you can never doubt about our dressing room is the character, the way that we always continue to keep believing and never give up. That's a real strong trait of ours. 

"I'm really proud and please that it has shone through today and the guys have gone on to get us 1-0 up."

England's victory puts them 1-0 up in the three-match series, a rare situation for Root and his players.

They have made a habit of losing the opener in recent history, including against West Indies on home soil earlier this year, but now have a lead to defend as the teams head to Southampton.

"I think the most important thing is we back it up again now. It's been frustrating in many ways [losing the opening game], but ultimately we've got to keep looking forward – and keep learning," Root said.

"There are definitely things we can take from this game and improve on. But I couldn't be more proud of the character we've shown, the way we approached the day and the clarity in which the way the guys played.

"On a very tough surface, to score that many runs, shows the ability of the group."

He added: "I couldn't be more proud of the lads. I thought that the way we approached the day was outstanding, and that partnership between Woaksey and Jos was magnificent.

"They were very clever about how they went about it, the way they constructed it."

Chris Woakes and Jos Buttler played starring roles as England chased down 277 to win an absorbing first Test of the series against Pakistan.  

The sixth-wicket pairing combined in a match-winning stand worth 139 to help Joe Root's side triumph against the odds in Manchester. 

Pakistan appeared on course to prevail when they reduced their opponents from 86-1 to 117-5, while there was a further twist in a see-saw game when Buttler departed for 75 with 21 still required. 

Stuart Broad also perished for seven following a promotion up the order, but the outstanding Woakes finished up on 84 not out to see England home with three wickets to spare.

The hosts had fought their way back into the contest with a clatter of wickets in the final session of the previous day's play, though still had work to do with the ball on Saturday morning. 

Resuming on 137-8, Pakistan's final two wickets added 32 in just 16 deliveries, Yasir Shah increasing the lead as he smacked 33 in a hurry. 

The flurry of boundaries – not all through conventional shots - hurt England, whose task became even harder when Rory Burns (10) fell early, trapped in front by the metronomic Mohammad Abbas.  

Dom Sibley (36) and captain Root (42) combined to put on 64, only for a post-lunch collapse to put Pakistan firmly in control. 

Sibley and Ben Stokes (9) both fell to leg-spinner Yasir Shah, Root edged behind off Naseem Shah and Ollie Pope (7) could do little with a brute of a delivery from Shaheen Afridi that climbed off a length, thumped into the batsman's glove and looped to gully.   

Yet Buttler and Woakes responded to the precarious situation by going on the offensive, their attacking intent paying off as Pakistan pushed fielders back to stem the sudden flow of runs. 

While Yasir Shah struck twice to create a little more tension late in the day, Woakes duly edged Shaheen to the third man boundary to get England over the line.

Chris Woakes believes England can pull off a stunning Old Trafford victory over Pakistan after a stirring bowling performance on the third day.

Paceman Woakes took 2-11 in five overs, with Stuart Broad (2-23) and Ben Stokes (2-11) also doing damage with the ball as Pakistan crumbled to 137-8 in their second innings.

That meant they led by 244, having outperformed England - all out for 219 earlier in the day - with the bat first time round, setting the stage for a run chase that the home side will hope begins early on Saturday.

Woakes told Sky Sports: "We'd have liked to have got close to them in the first innings, but we are where we are in the game, and we had an opportunity to go out there and bowl them out and thankfully we've got them eight down."

Pakistan have a fine pace attack but England could face a stiff test against the turning ball, on a pitch that has already offered plenty to leg-spinners Yasir Shah and Shadab Khan.

Asked if the wicket was likely to deteriorate, Woakes said: "Potentially, yeah. When you lose the toss on a surface like this, you're always going to be up against it, especially if there's a first-innings deficit.

"But at the same time we've given ourselves a chance. We feel we can get them. But we've still got to pick up two [wickets] in the morning."

When England bat, they cannot afford to take a cautious approach, according to Woakes.

"We've got to come out and try to be positive," he said. "If you look to sit in on this wicket, particularly against the spin I suppose, there's one with probably your name on it.

"I feel if we start well in a chase like that you've always got a chance."

Ben Stokes provided the spark as England stayed in the hunt for victory in a gripping first Test against Pakistan.

Picked just as a batsman for this match due to a niggling thigh injury, Stokes made a frustrating duck in England's first innings, but he stepped out of the slips to take the ball and pick up two prized Pakistan wickets.

Day three at Old Trafford ended with Pakistan on 137-8 in their second innings, 244 runs ahead of England.

However many more runs Pakistan add on Saturday morning, England will face a tough task to chase down their target, but they still have hope.

The home side had hope at the start of this day too, and they also had Ollie Pope, but England's new middle-order star added just 16 to his overnight score to be out for 62.

From a precarious 92-4 at the start of play, England were dismissed for an underwhelming 219, thankful again to Stuart Broad (29 not out) for some lusty lower-order hitting as the tail was soon exposed.

Pope fell to a scorching delivery from Naseem Shah, the ball leaping up off the pitch and catching the splice of the bat, arrowing low to Shadab Khan at gully.

Leg-spinner Yasir Shah removed home captain Joe Root on day two and began to make his presence felt again, bowling Jos Buttler (38) and Chris Woakes (19) either side of having Dom Bess snaffled at slip by a leaping Asad Shafiq.

Fellow leg-spinner Shadab Khan had Jofra Archer caught behind off the glove, before pinning last man James Anderson lbw.

Armed with a 107-run first-innings lead, Pakistan found England's pace attack troubling, with Shan Masood following his first-innings 156 with a duck, nibbling at a ball slanting across him and down the leg side from Broad, clipping through to Buttler.

Bess had Abid Ali caught in the deep by Woakes, who then made a key impact himself by having Babar Azam taken at slip by Stokes and Azhar Ali trapped leg before.

Dom Sibley got rid of Asad Shafiq (29) with a smart run out, but Pakistan were beginning to stabilise when Stokes entered the attack.

He claimed a wicket with his eighth delivery when he got Mohammad Rizwan (27) out lbw, then Broad had Shadab Khan in the same manner.

And shortly after 19:00 local time (18:00 GMT) Stokes struck again, a short ball accounting for Shaheen Afridi, the batsman lobbing one up for Rory Burns to take a safe catch.

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