Daniel Vettori is a master of drift, subtle variations in flight, speed and length. The combination makes him a fabulous T20 bowler. Add his lower-order batting to that equation and you have yourself a hell of an addition to your T20 line-up.

Easily, one of New Zealand’s greatest-ever cricketers, Vettori is considered the greatest exponent of left-arm orthodox spin since Bishen Singh Bedi.

Often bearing the brunt of being New Zealand’s sole wicket-taker except when Shane Bond would play, had the added bonus of making him very marketable as the face of the Kiwi side and soon the Indian Premier League (IPL) would come calling.

Vettori was bought for US$625,000 in the inaugural season of the IPL by the Delhi Daredevils with teammate and skipper Virender Sehwag calling him the best spinner in the world. He would go on to captain the Royal Challengers Bangalore, leading them to the 2011 final.

 

Career Statistics (2006-2015)

Full name: Daniel Luca Vettori

Born: January 27, 1979 (41), Auckland

Major teams: New Zealand, Delhi Daredevils, ICC World XI, Jamaica Tallawahs, Northern Districts, Nottinghamshire, Queensland, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Warwickshire

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Slow left-arm orthodox

 

T20I Career – New Zealand

Mat   Inns   Balls   Runs   Wkts   BBI      BBM    Ave     Econ    SR     4w    5w    10w

34       34     787     748       38     4/20     4/20    19.68   5.70    20.7     1        0      0

T20 Career

Mat   Inns   Balls    Runs     Wkts   BBI      BBM    Ave    Econ    SR     4w    5w    10w

143    143    3236    3424       131    4/20     4/20    26.13   6.34    24.7     1      0         0

 

Career Highlights

  • Took 38 T20I wickets at 19.68
  • Record best T20I economy rate (5.70)
  • 1 four-wicket haul in T20I
  • 131 T20 wickets captured at 26.13

One of New Zealand’s most consistent big hitters, Colin Munro is also much sought-after in all the T20 Leagues around the world.

But Munro wasn’t always a mainstay in the New Zealand team and had been in and out of the limited overs setup from his debut in 2012 until 2015 when he was the heaviest scorer in the Georgie Pie Super Smash. In the tournament, Munro would smash 366 runs at a strike rate of 175.

From then on, Munro was a fixture in the New Zealand top order, locking down the number three spot at the 2016 T20 World Cup.

A year later, Munro became just the fourth player to score multiple T20I centuries after Chris Gayle, Brendon McCullum, and Evin Lewis.

Munro, with three T20I centuries, stands on his own as an opener in the shortest format of the game.

He also topped the batting charts in the Hero Caribbean Premier League back in 2018 with a mammoth 567 runs for the eventual champions, the Trinbago Knight Riders. No player has ever scored more in a season. Munro has been a mainstay with the Trinbago Knight Riders since 2016 and has been retained for the Knight Riders for the 2020 season which begins in a few days.

 

Career Statistics (2010-present)

Full name: Colin Munro

Born: March 11, 1987 (33), Durban

Major teams: New Zealand, Auckland, Balkh Legends, Brampton Wolves, Delhi Capitals, Delhi Daredevils, Hampshire, Islamabad United, Karachi Kings, Kolkata Knight Riders, Mumbai Indians, New Zealand A, New Zealand Under-19s, New Zealand XI, North Island, North West Dragons, Sydney Sixers, Trinbago Knight Riders, Worcestershire, Worcestershire 2nd XI

Playing role: Opening batsman

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium-fast

 

T20I Career – New Zealand

Mat   Inns   NO     Runs    HS     Ave     BF      SR       100    50     4s     6s    

65       62      7      1724     109*  31.34   1102  156.44     3      11    132    107        

T20 Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs     HS     Ave      BF       SR       100    50    4s     6s   

262    246    29     6308      109*  29.06    4359   144.71    4      37    524    341       

 

Career Highlights

  • 1724 T20I runs at an average of 31.34
  • 1st player to score three centuries in T20I cricket.
  • New Zealand Men's T20 Player of the Year 2019
  • 3rd fastest T20I fifty of all time (14 balls)
  • 3rd most T20I sixes (107)
  • 4th best strike rate in T20Is (156.44)
  • 6308 T20 runs at 29.06

The wicket of Kane Williamson is among the most prized in all of cricket, simple because he takes care of it so well. Not taking a chance against the New Zealand captain is probably the biggest mistake any opposition can make. Once Williamson is at the crease, New Zealand is likely to be a difficult prospect to beat.

What is worse, is if Williamson has scored some runs before he plays against your team. That is problematic because he scores runs in bunches, like he did in the 2018 edition of the Indian Premier League (IPL) where he donned the Orange Cap, having scored 735 runs on the season. That was the season when Williamson was first announced as captain of Sunriser’s Hyderabad, a team he led to the IPL final where they were defeated by the Chennai Super Kings. And that has been the trend with Williamson, his performances improve with mounting responsibilities.

A stroke player, rather than a 'muscler' of the cricket ball, Williamson had to learn to play in the shortest format of the game, but he has. He was bought by Sunrisers for US$96,000 in 2015, winning the title the following year. He was one of the retained players in 2017, but by 2018, his value as a T20 batsman had soared, and it cost Sunrisers US$460,500 to keep him.  

 

Career Statistics (2009-present)

Full name: Kane Stuart Williamson

Born: August 8, 1990, Tauranga (29)

Major teams: New Zealand, Barbados Tridents, Edmonton Royals, Gloucestershire, Gloucestershire 2nd XI, New Zealand A, New Zealand Cricket XI, New Zealand Emerging Players, New Zealand Under-19s, New Zealand Under-19s, New Zealand XI, Northern Districts, Sunrisers Hyderabad, Yorkshire

Playing role: Top-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

 

T20I Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs         HS     Ave    BF         SR     100   50         4s     6s     Ct         St

60    58    7      1665         95    32.64         1330         125.18      0         11    170   36         27    0

T20 Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs         HS     Ave    BF         SR     100   50         4s     6s     Ct         St

181   173   21    4593         101* 30.21         3681         124.77      1         31    430   115         71    0  

 

Career Highlights

  • T20I caps for New Zealand (60)
  • 5th most T20I runs by a Kiwi (1665)
  • Averages 32.64 in T20Is
  • 4593 T20 runs at 30.21 average
  • IPL 2018 orange cap winner (735 runs)

As far as T20 leagues go, Martin Guptill’s ability to hit them clean has resulted in stints with IPL's Mumbai Indians, CPL's Guyana Amazon Warriors as well as St Kitts and Nevis Patriots, and BBL's Sydney Thunder. He's also played in the English county for Derbyshire and more recently Lancashire.

In T20Is, too, Guptill’s performances have been phenomenal. He became only the second New Zealand batsman to reach a thousand runs in the shortest format and has ruled Twenty20 cricket across the world.

 

Career Statistics (2006-present)

Full name: Martin James Guptill

Born: September 30, 1986, Auckland

Major teams: New Zealand, Auckland, Barbados Tridents, Derbyshire, Guyana Amazon Warriors, Kings XI Punjab, Mumbai Indians, New Zealand Academy, New Zealand Under-19s, St Kitts and Nevis Patriots, Sunrisers Hyderabad 

Playing role: Opening batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm off-break

 

T20I Career

Mat      Inns      NO   Runs     HS    Ave       BF    SR        100       50       4s       6s  

88          85         7     2536     105   32.51   1884   134.60    2         15       225     119      

T20 Career

Mat      Inns      NO   Runs     HS        Ave       BF      SR      100    50    4s     6s

253       245       23     7308     120*     32.91   5588    130.78    4     46    633   330

 

Career Highlights

  • 3rd most runs all-time in T20Is (#1 kiwi), 2,536r- avg. 32.51
  • 2nd most capped Kiwi in T20Is (88)
  • Received Sir Richard Hadlee Medal in 2011 (Kiwi cricketer of the year)
  • 2nd most T20 sixes (119)
  • New Zealand T20 Player of the Year (2011-12 & 2015-16)
  • Has scored a century in all 3 formats of the game (2 T20I centuries)
  • 7308 T20 runs at 32.91

Brutal and brilliant, Brendon McCullum is capable of destroying the best of bowling attacks.

A wicketkeeper-batsman, McCullum has been used throughout the New Zealand batting order, but whenever he arrives at the crease it's impossible to look away.

He was responsible for getting the IPL off to an electrifying start, lighting up the tournament's first match with 158 and showing what the format had to offer. And he reprised that style in Tests too - striking the fastest century in the format's history in his final match.

He also became the second man, after Chris Gayle, to score a Twenty20 international century when he brazenly scooped 155kph offerings from Shaun Tait and Dirk Nannes over the wicketkeeper's head in Christchurch in 2009-10.

 

Career statistics (T20s 2005-present)

Full Name: Brendon Barrie McCullum

Born: September 27, 1981, Dunedin, Otago (38)

Major teams:  New Zealand, Brisbane Heat, Canterbury, Chennai Super Kings, Glamorgan, Gujarat Lions, Kochi Tuskers Kerala, Kolkata Knight Riders, Lahore Qalandars, New South Wales, Otago, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Sussex, Toronto Nationals, Trinbago Knight Riders, Warwickshire

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

 

T20I Career

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50         

71           70           10           2140      123        35.66     1571      136.21          2         13         

T20 Career

Mat        Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50 

370        364           33           9922      158*      29.97     7269      136.49          7         55

Career highlights

  • 6th most runs all-time in T20I, 2140 avg. 35.66
  • 71 T20I caps for NZ
  • Record for the highest runs scored at a T20 WC (123)
  • 1st player to score 1,000 T20I runs
  • Has scored a century in all three formats of the game
  • First player to score two T20I tons
  • New Zealand T20 Player of the Year (2012/13)
  • 3rd most runs scored in T20 matches (9922 at 29.97)

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has officially launched the inaugural ICC Men's Cricket World Cup Super League, starting with England's one-day series against Ireland.

Introduced to help bring context to 50-over cricket at the highest level, the Super League will be used as a qualification system for the next ICC World Cup, scheduled for 2023 in India.

There will be 13 teams involved – the 12 full members, as well as the Netherlands – and the top seven in the final table will automatically secure their place at the global tournament, the ICC confirmed in a statement.

All sides will play four series at home and away, with each consisting of three matches.

"The league will bring relevance and context to ODI cricket over the next three years, as qualification for the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2023 is at stake," Geoff Allardice, ICC general manager for cricket operations, said.

"The Super League gives cricket fans around the world even more reasons to watch as the drama of league cricket unfolds.

"The decision last week to move the World Cup back to late 2023 gives us more time to schedule any games lost due to COVID-19 and preserve the integrity of the qualification process, meaning it will be decided on the field of play, which is important."

Reigning world champions England will kick things off this week when they start their series against Ireland, the first of three matches between the teams taking place at the Rose Bowl on Thursday.

"We're looking forward to playing cricket again and to the ICC Men's World Cup Super League," England white-ball captain Eoin Morgan said.

"Given the situation, it will be quite different to the last time we played at home, when we lifted the World Cup at Lord's, but it's nice to be starting our journey for the next edition of the tournament. 

"I'm sure cricket fans all over the world will be excited to see white-ball cricket resume and we're looking forward to the challenge."

Gary Stead has dismissed talk of a rift between himself and Kane Williamson and the New Zealand head coach revealed he has held positive talks over a new contract.

It has been reported that the relationship between Stead and Black Caps captain Williamson has deteriorated, with speculation that the head coach wanted Tom Latham to take over as Test skipper.

Stead denied that was the case back in May and although he says there is "positive conflict" between the two, the 48-year-old insisted they have no problem working together.

He told Stuff: "Kane and I have a really strong relationship, and we spoke about it.

"There was no basis in truth and the disappointing part is it's coming from somewhere and someone, but it's not Kane and it's not I.

"I really enjoy working with Kane. The discussions we have are robust and always directed at what's best for the team, which is something I know we are truly aligned on.

"It's like any business, you always have positive conflict and if there wasn't, then I'd be worried."

Stead is nearing the end of the two-year deal he signed to replace Mike Hesson, but hopes to extend his tenure.

"Talks have been pretty positive and, if New Zealand Cricket and the players feel as though I can keep contributing then I'd be interested in continuing on," he added.

New Zealand have not played since March due to the coronavirus pandemic and are not due to be in action until hosting West Indies in a Test series in November, subject to government approval.

World Rugby has proposed the introduction of a temporary international window before the end of 2020, a move that would allow this year's Six Nations to be completed.

The governing body's executive committee is keen for international fixtures to be staged again to aid the sport as it tries to deal with the off-field impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Having held discussions with all international and club competitions, as well as players and national unions, World Rugby wants a window that will start in late October and run into December.

The revised calendar would allow for the 2020 Six Nations tournament - suspended due to the COVID-19 outbreak in March - to stage the final four fixtures still outstanding, followed by Test matches in Europe organised by the individual unions.

As for the Rugby Championship, the 2020 edition would take place in one country over a six-week period spanning November 7 to December 12.

"Recognising the importance of a balanced and shared compromise among all stakeholders, a temporary international window between October 24 and December 5 has been recommended," said a statement from World Rugby.

"In the north, this window will accommodate the postponed men's and women's Six Nations matches at the end of October, a rest weekend on November 7 and a programme of international matches involving the Six Nations and invited teams hosted in Europe from November 14 through to December 5."

With the Rugby Championship, "special" measures would be put in place to cope with travel restrictions, while the changes to the schedule allows leading players to be available for their clubs.

"With COVID-19 restrictions continuing to impact international travel and borders across southern hemisphere unions, on an exceptional basis the Rugby Championship 2020 will be hosted in full in a single country over a reduced six-week period between November 7 and December 12," the statement continued.

"Special measures will be implemented to deal with any government-required quarantine period prior to the start of the competition.

"The rescheduling of the domestic, European and international calendars will accommodate the ability for the professional clubs to have access to their star southern hemisphere international players for the completion of the postponed and rescheduled 2019-20 seasons at a time in which they would have ordinarily been on international duty in August and September."

The recommendations will need to receive approval at next week's meeting of the World Rugby Council.

With the West Indies faltering badly in their first innings to eventually fall to England in the second Test of the #raisethebat Series, I thought it interesting to look back at a game where the West Indies used their first innings to ensure a game that could have gotten away from them, didn’t.

It turns out that maybe the game would not have had a result anyway, but the West Indies weren’t to know that and their performance to pull themselves out of trouble, was memorable.

In December of 2008, a powerful New Zealand Test side could find no way past a game West Indies and interestingly, the tone for the fight the visitors would put up came from the bat of Jamaican pace bowler Jerome Taylor.

It was the first Test of a two-match series and the West Indies had long been missing the names of the cricketers that made them great.

Though those names, Clive Lloyd, Viv Richards, Brian Lara, Malcolm Marshall, were no longer around, the proud legacy they left behind meant even this ‘watered-down’ version of the West Indies would not be pushovers.

The West Indies were sent into the field first up and despite three wickets apiece from Daren Powell (3-68), Fidel Edwards (3-91) and skipper Chris Gayle (3-42), things were off to a rocky start.

New Zealand would put 365 on the board on the first day, thanks to 95 from Daniel Flynn and 89 from Jesse Ryder.

No play was possible on day two of the Test and when the West Indies went to bat, the conditions for batting had changed.

Still Gayle was at his aggressive best, slamming 74 from 103 deliveries to get the run chase off to a rollicking good start. However, Sewnarine Chattergoon (13), Ramnaresh Sarwan (8), and Xavier Marshall (20), did not stay very long.

Shivnarine Chanderpaul, however, would bat with, of all people, pacer Jerome Taylor, to give West Indies a chance at staying in the game.

Before Taylor came to the crease, Chanderpaul, who would eventually make 76 from 200 deliveries, lost the services of Brendan Nash for 23 and Denesh Ramdin for five.

Now he was batting with the tail, the score was 173-6. Even with a day rained out, this game could have been over in a jiffy.

But Taylor wasn’t in the mood to give up the ghost and scored an almost run-a-ball century, slamming 17 fours and three massive sixes, to end on 106 from 107.

Nobody else scored a run and so the West Indies crept, or rather, blasted their way to 340, a deficit of just 25.

Rain made sure there was no play on the fourth day and much of the fifth day, with New Zealand, 44-2 in their second innings before the game came to an end.

But Taylor’s batting made sure there was little chance of New Zealand running away with the game and provides an example of some of the heroics current West Indies coach, Phil Simmons, will be hoping to see with today’s batsmen when the team meets England in the decider of the #raisethebat Series.

Steve Hansen says New Zealand Rugby owes Australian counterparts nothing and urged officials to be strong in talks over the future of Super Rugby.

NZ Rugby commissioned the Aratipu review to look into the Super Rugby model and put plans in place to rebuild finances after being hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic.

There has been talk of reducing the number of Australian teams in a new-look trans-Tasman competition.

Rugby Australia chairman Hamish McLennan this week compared the relationship between his governing body and NZ Rugby to a "master-servant" dynamic.

Former All Blacks head coach Hansen has urged NZ Rugby to stand firm when negotiations take place.

"Without being controversial, we have been looking after the Aussies for years," Hansen told Stuff Media.

"And every time we have required something from them, particularly at a high level, sometimes they have gone missing.

"Do we owe them something? No. But because we are the nation we are, and we care about the game more than just ourselves, we bend and buckle a bit.’"

He added: "I think NZ Rugby are in the mood for having strong discussions … because they only get one shot at it."

Hansen does not believe it would be a wise move to have more New Zealand teams in a Super Rugby competition and feels less travel can be a benefit for players.

"You don't want to be diluting the talent pool. And then you have to ask, 'Do we want our athletes travelling all around the world as much as they have been?'.

"If the answer is 'no', you look internally into New Zealand or maybe Australia [for a structure of the tournament) because it's not far away."

All Blacks star Beauden Barrett has signed with Japanese side Suntory Sungoliath and will miss next year's Super Rugby season.

Barrett, 29, signed a four-year deal with New Zealand Rugby (NZR) and the Blues in 2019, but will head to Japan in 2021 before returning for the international season.

The star playmaker will play under Kiwi coach Milton Haig, while England head coach Eddie Jones is a consultant for Suntory Sungoliath.

"For me it made sense to go next year and then have two years back with the Blues and hopefully the All Blacks in the lead up to the Rugby World Cup," Barrett said.

"My wife and I are excited to head to Japan next year. It is an appealing place for a young family and comparatively safe in health terms.

"The Investec Super Rugby Aotearoa competition has been an amazing experience. It's been brutal and demanding which is what you expect when New Zealand teams play each other.

"I'm loving every minute of it and having such big crowds turning out has been fantastic. I am loving the move to the Blues and we still have a job to do this season. It is an excellent environment with great coaching and an awesome bunch of dedicated players.

"While the excitement about heading to Japan will build closer to the time, I'll also be looking forward to being back later in 2021 and then into the 2022 Blues season."

All Blacks Brodie Retallick and Sam Whitelock have had similar agreements to play in Japan this year.

Blues head coach Leon MacDonald said he was planning for next year without Barrett.

"Our focus is fully on the current campaign but we have plans for next year without Beaudy," he said.

"He will be a big loss but that is countered with what he is doing on and off the field this year, and that we get him for two more years.

"We have Otere Black playing terrific rugby, and Harry Plummer who has been coming off the bench, while we will have Stephen Perofeta back next season from injury."

Jurgen Klopp hopes Liverpool can be inspired by the All Blacks and not settle for just one Premier League title.

Liverpool have won their first league trophy since 1990 after a dominant Premier League campaign, adding to last season's Champions League success.

Ahead of visiting Manchester City on Thursday, Klopp said he wanted Liverpool to continue pushing – inspired by New Zealand's national rugby union side the All Blacks.

"We feel in the middle of something, not the end of something," Klopp told reporters.

"We have to give everything until we finish our careers. As long as you wear this shirt, less than 100 per cent is not allowed. That is not my phrase, it came from the All Blacks. I saw that in a nice documentary about the All Blacks and I kept that always for myself. That is for each LFC player the same and for me the same.

"We prepare for Man City with full focus. We will be prepared for the next season as well. I don't know another way. I've learned when you think you've reached the pinnacle you are already on the way down and we don't feel that.

"I don't feel finally satisfied. It's a big step but not the only thing I want to talk about with the boys in 20 years."

With seven games remaining, Liverpool are 23 points clear of City ahead of their meeting at the Etihad Stadium.

But Klopp played down any talk either side could make a statement by winning the encounter, saying next season shaped as being different.

"A statement is a statement, I don't think we have to make them, what would change for next year if we beat City and what would happen to us if they won?" he said.

"People will say a few things. If we win they will say it's the best team in the league and if they win they will say, whatever City is better but we won the league, whatever people will say it's really not so important for next season for sure not.

"We both have to be ready for next year, not that I would be too worried about City, but we all have to be ready. You can really see at the moment that United is coming up, they're very much the same team a few weeks ago, besides one or two players, and people thought they had no chance, and now we see how good they are and how good they could be and they will not be worse next year, for sure, and again Chelsea as well."

FIFA has announced Australia and New Zealand will be joint hosts of the 2023 Women's World Cup.

A combined bid from Football Federation Australia (FFA) and New Zealand Football (NZF) saw off competition from Colombia to be awarded the tournament at a FIFA Council vote.

Following the success of the 2019 World Cup in France, the next edition will increase in size as 32 nations are to be involved.

The Colombia Football Association had hoped to become the first South American country to stage a Women's World Cup. However, they received only 13 of 35 votes.

Instead it will be Australia and New Zealand who make history, as they will host the first World Cup held across two continental confederations (Asia and Oceania).

FIFA president Gianni Infantino revealed the final verdict live on social media after congratulating both bids for their "remarkable work" during the process.

"FFA and NZF would like to thank the FIFA Council for their landmark decision, which will see the two countries host a tournament of firsts ─ the first ever co-confederation hosted FIFA World Cup, the first ever FIFA Women's World Cup to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first ever to be held in the southern hemisphere," the FFA and NZF said in a statement after the announcement.

"A player-centric tournament, Australia-New Zealand promises to deliver record-breaking crowds and long-term participation growth, bringing football together 'As One' to celebrate the women's game.

"FFA and NZF would also like to thank the Australian and New Zealand governments, Matildas' and Football Ferns' fans and the entire football family who have supported the bid from the outset, as well as the bidding team who worked tirelessly to develop a bid that will unlock the untapped football potential of the Asia-Pacific region."

Brazil and Japan had also at one stage been in the running before dropping out.

The Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) said the current economic situation, fuelled by the coronavirus pandemic, was one of the reasons for its withdrawal.

The All Blacks are in talks with rugby league world champions Australia over a cross-code match later this year, New Zealand Rugby (NZR) has confirmed.

December 5 has been mooted as the potential date for a 14-a-side meeting between rugby union powerhouse New Zealand and the Kangaroos.

Both codes are keen to generate as much revenue as possible, having been shut down for three months during the coronavirus pandemic.

"We've had an approach. We'll work that through and go through the proper process... if we feel it has merit to take further," NZR chief executive Mark Robinson said.

"It's one of the many different options ... we are considering.

"It's not new. The last time NZR had an approach was in 2017."

However, Robinson did state the "priority" for the All Blacks remains competing in international rugby union.

Australia coach Mal Meninga is keen for the game to be agreed to help the Kangaroos achieve "global recognition".

"I'm keen to make this happen. We want to play the All Blacks, hopefully, we can get the concept off the ground," he told the Courier Mail.

"This would take the Kangaroos to the world. There will be global recognition.

"We are still in talks but obviously news of this has got out.

"The best from our game versus the best from the New Zealand game … let's do it."

Crusaders captain Scott Barrett will miss the rest of the Super Rugby Aotearoa season as he requires surgery on a big toe injury.

The New Zealand lock was hurt playing in an internal game on June 13 and, following medical consultation, the decision was taken for Barrett to go under the knife.

Alex Ainley comes into the squad to cover for Barrett, while Codie Taylor takes over the armband.

A Crusaders statement read: "Crusaders Captain Scott Barrett sustained a significant injury to the structures supporting his big toe, while playing in the Crusaders internal game on Saturday 13 June.  

"After consultation with a foot specialist, it has been determined that Scott will miss the remainder of the Investec Super Rugby Aotearoa competition to undergo surgery and allow sufficient time to recover. Exact return to play dates are uncertain at this stage. 

"Alex Ainley has joined the Crusaders squad as injury cover for the competition, and Codie Taylor will take over captaincy of the side for the remainder of the season."

Barrett signed a new deal to stay with New Zealand Rugby and the Crusaders until 2023 last month.

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