Four-time Olympic gold medallist Mo Farah insists he would have no problem with any samples he has provided in doping tests being retested.

The British long-distance runner has for years had to contend with questions and insinuations surrounding his long association with the now-banned American coach Alberto Salazar.

Farah has always denied any wrongdoing and has never failed a drugs test, with the 36-year-old often running and winning under added pressure because of the focus that has been trained upon him.

Former World Anti Doping Agency (WADA) president Sir Craig Reedie, speaking while in office last year, signalled proposals that could see experts conduct new tests on old samples of the many athletes who worked with the disgraced Salazar.

Salazar strenuously denied breaking the rules but was found by the United States Anti Doping Agency (USADA) last year to have committed three violations associated with "orchestrating and facilitating prohibited doping conduct".

He received a four-year ban, with Nike then closing the Oregon Project training group that he led. Salazar has appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport against the punishment.

It emerged last weekend that UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) intended to prevent previous samples provided by Farah or any athlete from being re-examined, unless "credible evidence" could be provided that pointed to the use of banned substances.

UKAD president Nicola Sapstead voiced concern that old samples could be damaged by being released for fresh testing; however, the Russian Anti-Doping Agency - no stranger to controversy - has urged the British authority to drop its reluctance.

Farah has been a bystander during this exchange of views, but the six-time world champion would be open to his samples being looked at again.

That is a point he also made in the immediate wake of Salazar being banned.

Farah wrote on Twitter: "I've seen reports of my name in connection to UKAD and WADA about sample retesting.

"Just to be clear, I was not consulted about this and as I've said many times, I am happy for any anti-doping body to test any of my previous samples anytime."

Mo Farah has performed a U-turn and elected to defend his 10,000m title at the Tokyo Olympics next year.

Two years ago, Farah walked away from track events to concentrate on marathons and he finished eighth across 26.2 miles in Chicago last month having won the event in 2018.

However, the 36-year-old has decided to return to shorter distances and will aim to add to his Olympic medal collection at the next Games.

Farah, who will still need to qualify for the event in Tokyo, won gold over 5,000m and 10,000m at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics.

"It's been really exciting to compete at the marathon for the last couple of years," Farah said in a message posted on his YouTube Channel.

"To win the Chicago Marathon, as a major marathon, that was nice. To finish third in the London Marathon, was okay, it was good.

"It's been a good learning curve for me - doing the marathon, to run 2:05 - British record, European record. The training for it was totally different to the track.

"Next year I've decided, Tokyo 2020, I'm going to be back on the track. I'm really excited to be competing back on the track and giving it a go in the 10,000 metres.

"Hopefully I haven't lost my speed. I'll train hard for it and see what I can do."

Alberto Salazar has formally lodged an appeal against his four-year ban from athletics to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the ruling body has confirmed.

Salazar, along with Dr Jeffrey Brown, received a hefty suspension after being found guilty of possessing and trafficking banned substances by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA)

Following news of Salazar's ban, Nike closed down the 61-year-old's Oregon Project, while the World Anti-Doping Agency and UK Anti-Doping Agency have confirmed athletes formerly coached by the American - including 2012 and 2016 Olympic gold medallist Mo Farah - are set to be investigated.

Salazar previously stated he would be appealing the ban, and CAS has now announced two cases have been opened, though it appears the hearings will not go ahead until March 2020 at the earliest.

"CAS has registered the appeals filed by Mr Alberto Salazar and Dr Jeffrey Brown against USADA in relation to the decisions rendered by the American Arbitration Association, North American Court of Arbitration for Sport Panel on 30 September 2019 and 7 October 2019 respectively, in which they were found to have committed anti-doping rule violations and sanctioned with a four-year period of ineligibility," a statement read.

"Two CAS arbitration procedures have been opened. The parties have requested additional time to file their written submissions and evidence.

"Accordingly, at this stage, it appears that the hearings in these two matters are unlikely to take place before March 2020."

UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) says it will review whether any action is required against British athletes who were trained by the now banned coach Alberto Salazar.

The organisation released a statement on Tuesday after the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announced that it would investigate Salazar's former pupils.

Salazar was banned from coaching during the World Athletics Championships in Doha, after he – along with Dr Jeffrey Brown – was found guilty of possessing and trafficking banned substances after a four-year investigation by the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

The verdict preceded Salazar's Nike Oregon Project being shut down, though the 61-year-old stated he will appeal his four-year ban.

Farah, who Salazar helped become the most successful British track athlete in modern Olympic Games history, claimed in October that there was an "agenda" against him after he was questioned over his former coach's actions.

But he will be one of the athletes to come under the spotlight of UKAD's review.

"We have been working with USADA on their investigation into the Nike Oregon Project and will work with WADA on their investigation if there is any evidence that relates to athletes or athlete support personnel under our jurisdiction," UKAD chief executive Nicole Sapstead said in a statement.

"We are reviewing the decision regarding Alberto Salazar to determine if there is any action we may wish to take as a national anti-doping organisation."

Farah has always maintained his innocence and has not been found guilty of any wrongdoing. 

Mo Farah and other athletes who trained under Alberto Salazar are to be investigated by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

Salazar was banned from coaching during the World Athletics Championships in Doha, after he – along with Dr Jeffrey Brown – were found guilty of possessing and trafficking banned substances after a four-year investigation by the US Anti-Doping Agency.

The verdict resulted in Salazar's Nike Oregon Project being shut down, though the 61-year-old stated he will appeal his four-year ban.

Farah, who Salazar helped become the most successful British track athlete in modern Olympic Games history, claimed in October that there was an "agenda" against him after he was questioned over his former coach's actions.

However, Farah – along with athletes who previously worked with Salazar – will now be scrutinised by WADA, according to its president Craig Reedie.

"The clear question is did any of the allegations concerning Salazar and his operations result in athletes cheating themselves, which might have influenced their performance and might have involved the winning of competitions," Reedie told BBC Sport.

"We need to look at that and we will."

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