Marcus Rashford's successful lobbying of the UK government to extend its free school meals provision showed the "big power" of popular footballers, according to UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin.

Manchester United and England forward Rashford wrote to members of parliament urging them to extend food voucher provision for 1.3 million children from low-income families over the forthcoming school holidays.

The scheme typically only runs during term time but Rashford ultimately persuaded prime minister Boris Johnson to take action, in light of increased difficulties for many of the most vulnerable in society during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Speaking at a video conference on Wednesday, Ceferin praised Rashford and suggested his organisation could do more when looking to address social issues.

"He is a very popular football player," said Ceferin.

"It's a big, big power and obviously he's a smart guy. We are impressed by his achievement."

Rashford is one of a number of players who have given their support to the Black Lives Matter movement following the death of George Floyd in police custody last month.

Protests calling for an end to racial discrimination have swept the globe and Ceferin confirmed UEFA is reviewing its own work in this area, especially with regards to improving black and minority ethnic (BAME) representation within its operations.

"We are discussing about many things these days. We know the situation is serious, and it is more and more serious every day," he said.

"It's too early to share with the public because we haven't concretely yet. We know the power of football and governing bodies is huge, so we should use that for at least good messaging.

"Probably the campaigns we had were not enough. We tried a lot. Still, I think we should come to the next level.

"Honestly speaking, it is too early to speak about our concrete ideas that we are discussing."

Marcus Rashford and Raheem Sterling have used their platforms to make the world a better place, according to Pep Guardiola.

The Manchester City boss spoke of his admiration for the duo, citing them as prime examples of why footballers should feel empowered to speak out.

Manchester United forward Rashford led a successful campaign to force a U-turn from the United Kingdom government on the provision of free meals to vulnerable children during the school holidays, with the coronavirus pandemic having left many families in a worse plight.

Fellow England star Sterling has been vocal on the issue of racism, which has come into sharper focus globally following the death in police custody of George Floyd.

Addressing the critics who favour the response "stick to football" when players decide to take a stand, Guardiola said: "Maybe these stupid people don't believe you are human beings too.

"We can have an opinion the same as a nurse, a doctor or even a politician.

"We are humans and why shouldn't we say our opinion when you believe you can make a better society, when you are public?

"What Raheem Sterling has done many times, players in our club, Marcus Rashford or whoever, of course they have to use these platforms to make a better society.

"They don't need to get more money – fortunately for them they have enough – so they do it to get a better place to live, for their families, for our kids, for the next generations.

"So that is always why, when the people say it is not enough, of course it isn't but let's start from here. I admire these kinds of gestures a lot because they do it for all of us."

Guardiola's side return to Premier League action after a three-month absence with the visit of Arsenal on Wednesday.

Marcus Rashford hopes the success of his free school meals campaign will encourage other players to speak up about social issues they care about.

The Manchester United and England striker wrote to members of parliament this week, imploring the United Kingdom government to continue providing food vouchers for 1.3million vulnerable children over the school holidays.

The scheme typically only runs during term time but the government made a U-turn on Tuesday and extended it for six weeks, with prime minister Boris Johnson claiming he had been unaware of Rashford's campaign prior to learning about the 22-year-old's own story.

Rashford feels it can be used as an example for why modern players should use their platforms to highlight important societal matters, as his England team-mates Raheem Sterling and Jadon Sancho have done regarding racial injustice.

"Especially our generation of players in our sport, it's becoming more normal that people speak out on topics that they believe in," Rashford told BBC Breakfast.

"I think it's just positive for the future. We look at the generations after us, hopefully it becomes a normal thing and people actually want to do that and put themselves forward to do that."

Rashford has also helped charity FareShare reach a goal of supplying three million meals for children by the end of June.

He received widespread support for his lobbying of MPs, with United and England great David Beckham among those to praise his work.

Asked what his current United team-mates had said to him, Rashford replied: "They've all been interested and just asking questions about it.

"People want to make change and sometimes, like I was, you don't know the ins and outs of certain situations and the amount of people that it's actually affecting.

"They're just asking general questions like that and just trying to gain an understanding of it, which is definitely positive because that's what you need to do - you need to raise awareness to people who don't know."

The forward intends to continue to campaign for disadvantaged children having revealed his own reliance on free meals and food vouchers when growing up.

Though the campaign has dominated the news agenda in the UK over the past few days, health secretary Matt Hancock still managed to commit a faux pas when he called Rashford 'Daniel' during a Sky News interview on Wednesday.

Rashford saw the funny side, writing back to England legend Gary Lineker on Twitter: "I've been called much worse over the last couple of days."

Hancock later replied to Rashford calling him "a credit to the nation".

Rashford wrote back: "As I said yesterday this was never about politics or me.

"The PM didn't need to U-turn the decision but I'm thankful he did. I asked you to listen and you did that so on behalf of all mums like mine, dads and carers that are struggling across the country, thank you."

Prime Minister Boris Johnson admitted he was unaware of Marcus Rashford's campaign to extend food vouchers for vulnerable children until the day the United Kingdom government made a U-turn.

Manchester United and England striker Rashford wrote to members of parliament on Monday, imploring the government not to stop free school meals for around 1.3million disadvantaged children from next month.

The food voucher scheme only normally runs during term time but was used during the Easter holiday because of the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, and Rashford had asked for the government to extend it again.

On Monday, shortly after Rashford tweeted his letter, the Department of Education posted a blog on its website reiterating that the scheme was not due to run over the school summer holidays in the UK.

However, after support for Rashford's campaign continued to grow on Tuesday, the government announced a six-week, £120million 'COVID summer food fund'.

Speaking at the government's daily briefing, Johnson said: "I talked to Marcus Rashford today and congratulated him on his campaign which, to be honest, I only became aware of today. I thank him for what he's done. I think he's right to draw attention to this issue.

"We've got large numbers of kids who haven't been able to get back into school, we're got a problem in getting kids back into school in the way that we would want for the reasons that people understand - though actually there are lots of kids that aren't going back to school and I'd like to see that happen.

"I do think it's right that we should be looking after the families of the most vulnerable, the neediest right now and that's why we have got the COVID summer fund plan that we've announced today, and I hope it will make a big difference to those kids and those families."

Rashford, who has also helped charity FareShare reach a goal of supplying three million meals by the end of June, had spoken about his own reliance on free school meals and food banks growing up.

The 22-year-old - praised by both United and England on social media - wrote a message to MPs on Twitter that said his campaign was "never about politics".

Rashford said: "This was never about me or you, this was never about politics, this was a cry out for help from vulnerable parents all over the country and I simply provided a platform for their voices to be heard.

"I stand proud today knowing that we have listened, and we have done what is right.

"There is still a long way to go but I am thankful to you all that we have given these families just one less thing to worry about tonight.

"The wellbeing of our children should ALWAYS be a priority."

Marcus Rashford said the United Kingdom government has "done what is right" after making a U-turn and extending its food voucher scheme to vulnerable children.

Earlier this week Manchester United and England striker Rashford wrote to members of parliament imploring the government not to stop free school meals for disadvantaged kids when term finishes.

Vouchers were given out over the Easter holiday due to the coronavirus pandemic but the scheme only normally runs during term time and so was set to end from next month.

However, following Rashford's letter, which received widespread support on social media, the government announced a six-week £120million COVID summer food fund that is thought to benefit around 15 per cent of state school pupils.

Rashford wrote a message on Twitter that he addressed "to all MPs", saying: "This was never about me or you, this was never about politics, this was a cry out for help from vulnerable parents all over the country and I simply provided a platform for their voices to be heard.

"I stand proud today knowing that we have listened, and we have done what is right.

"There is still a long way to go but I am thankful to you all that we have given these families just one less thing to worry about tonight.

"The wellbeing of our children should ALWAYS be a priority."

Rashford, who has also helped charity FareShare reach a goal of supplying three million meals by the end of June, had spoken about his own reliance on free school meals and food banks growing up.

The 22-year-old had continued to push for change despite Downing Street initially reiterating that the scheme would end when schools closed for the holidays.

As well as being praised by Labour leader Keir Starmer and Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, United also paid tribute to their striker.

"A hero. An inspiration. One of our own. We are so proud of you, MarcusRashford," the Premier League club wrote on Twitter.

England also wrote a message of support on Twitter, saying: "Amazing to see your efforts rewarded and to know so many will benefit. We're so proud of you, Marcus."

The United Kingdom government has extended its food voucher scheme for vulnerable school children following a campaign led by Manchester United striker Marcus Rashford.

England international Rashford wrote a letter to members of the House of Commons on Monday imploring them not to stop free school meals for disadvantaged children when term finishes. 

Vouchers were given out over the Easter holiday because of the coronavirus pandemic, but the scheme normally only runs during term time and so was due to end next month.

However, Rashford's campaign to force the government to rethink its approach received widespread support on social media and has now resulted in Downing Street making a U-turn.

"Owing to the coronavirus pandemic the prime minister fully understands that children and parents face an entirely unprecedented situation over the summer," a spokesperson for prime minister Boris Johnson said.

"To reflect this we will be providing a COVID summer food fund, this will provide food vouchers over the six-week summer holiday period.

"This is a specific measure to reflect the unique circumstances of the pandemic. The scheme will not continue beyond the summer."

Rashford reacted to the news on Twitter, saying: "I don't even know what to say. Just look at what we can do when we come together, THIS is England in 2020."

Marcus Rashford has vowed to continue his fight for free school meals, stating combating child poverty is "something much bigger than football".

United Kingdom prime minister Boris Johnson on Monday rejected a plea from England international Rashford for children who qualified for the food voucher scheme during the coronavirus lockdown to carry on receiving them after the academic year ends.

The Manchester United forward responded by tweeting: "We aren't beaten yet, stand strong for the 200,000 children who haven't had a meal to eat today and keep retweeting #maketheUturn."

In an article for The Times, Rashford called on the government to "do the right thing" and "give our vulnerable families just one less thing to worry about".

Rashford wrote: "People often ask me how it felt to score the deciding penalty against PSG to knock them out of the Champions League last season, my answer is always the same: did we go on to win the tournament?

"I have been overwhelmed by the support I've received over the last 24 hours, from MPs and members of the public, but the feeling I have is exactly the same as when we got knocked out of the Champions League against Barcelona in the next round: what did we achieve if we didn't get the result we needed? If we didn't lift the Champions League?

"Today I focus on a trophy that stands for something much bigger than football.

"A U-turn on the decision to stop the free food voucher scheme continuing over the summer holidays could help us reach the next round but we still have a very long way to go as a country to eventually lift the trophy.

"In this case, the trophy is combating child poverty.

"I don't claim to have the education of an MP in parliament, but I do have a social education. I am clued up on the difference a U-turn decision would make on the 1.3 million vulnerable children across the UK who are registered for free school meals because 10 years ago I was one of them."

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday, he added: "When you wake up this morning and run your shower, take a second to think about the parents who have had their water turned off during lockdown.

"When you turn on your kettle to make a cup of tea or coffee think of those parents who have had to default on electricity bill payments just to make ends meet having lost their jobs during the pandemic.

"And when you head to the fridge to grab the milk, stop and recognise that parents of at least 200,000 children across the country this morning are waking up to empty shelving.

"Recognise children around the country are this morning innocently questioning 'why?' 9 out of 30 children in any given classroom are today asking 'why?' 'Why does our future not matter?'"

Labour leader Keir Starmer backed Rashford's call for the government to make a U-turn on free school meals, with the subject to be debated as part of an opposition day in parliament.

Shadow education secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey told the BBC: "Any government that is willing to let the poorest children in the country go hungry needs to take a long hard look at its priorities.

"Shamefully, children go hungry every year, but this summer will be especially difficult for many families as job losses and reduced incomes hit household budgets.

"There will be many Conservative MPs today watching this and having read Marcus' letter who will be agonising about whether they support the government or not in this because they will want what's best for children.

"So, I'm asking all politicians, whatever party they're in, this is not about party politics, this is about making sure children don't go hungry over the summer holidays."

Marcus Rashford has been "blown away" by the response to his letter calling for the United Kingdom government to continue their food voucher scheme over the school holidays.

Manchester United striker Rashford has written to members of the House of Commons imploring them not to stop providing vouchers for vulnerable children who receive free school meals during term time.

Vouchers were given out over the Easter holiday because of the coronavirus pandemic, but the scheme is set to end next month when the next school holidays begin.

In his letter, 22-year-old Rashford wrote: "The Government has taken a 'whatever it takes' approach to the economy – I'm asking you today to extend that same thinking to protecting all vulnerable children across England. I encourage you to hear their pleas and find your humanity.

"Please reconsider your decision to cancel the food voucher scheme over the summer holiday and guarantee the extension. This is England in 2020, and this is an issue that needs urgent assistance."

The England international, who has raised around £20million while working with FareShare to supply three million meals, was widely praised on social media for his words.

Labour leader Keir Starmer wrote on Twitter: "This is such an important and moving letter. @MarcusRashford is right, we cannot let 1.3 million children go hungry this summer. Thank you, Marcus, for all the work you are doing to support children during the coronavirus crisis."

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan also retweeted Rashford's post with the comment: "I might be a Londoner and Liverpool fan, but I fully support @ManUtd's @MarcusRashford. As a child I benefitted from free school meals. The Government must extend its free school meal scheme for disadvantaged children over the summer holidays. (And his mum should be very proud.)"

Rashford later posted again on Monday afternoon, writing: "Wow, just got home from training and I'm blown away with the support. It's not over yet, let's keep retweeting and tagging local MPs. We need to be the voice for those 200,000 children who have no choice but to skip meals today, I refuse to give up #maketheUturn"

The Department of Education posted a blog on its website detailing the free school meals scheme and its criteria.

A spokesperson said: "As schools open more widely, and their kitchens reopen, we expect schools to make food parcels available for collection or delivery for any children that are eligible for free school meals who are not yet able to return to school. Where this is not possible, schools can continue to offer vouchers to eligible pupils.

"Free school meals are ordinarily term time only, and the national voucher scheme will not run during the summer holidays. However, as announced this week by the Prime Minister, the local authority welfare assistance scheme will provide help to those who are struggling to afford food and other essentials due to the impact of COVID-19. £63million is being allocated to this important project.

"Thousands of children will also receive additional support through our Holiday Activities and Food programme, which offers activities and free meals throughout the summer holidays."

Marcus Rashford has spoken of how Manchester United allowed him to join their academy programmes early after his mother let them know of tough circumstances at home.

England forward Rashford has helped charity FareShare reach a goal of supplying three million meals to vulnerable children in the United Kingdom by the end of June amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Late on Sunday, Rashford published an open letter pleading with the UK government not to stop a food voucher scheme, which was set up to guarantee meals to children when schools were shut down in March, next month.

In the letter, Rashford spoke about his own experiences growing up and went into more details during an interview with BBC Breakfast.

He revealed his mother, Melanie, had spoken to the Red Devils about their home situation and United allowed him to join up at age 11 rather than 12.

"My mum was a single parent, she had five kids all living in the same house. The programme that I started at 11 years old, you're supposed to start it at 12 years old," he said.

"It basically gives you accommodation closer to the training facilities and a new school and she worked that hard to push it forward because she knew that was a step I needed to take.

"I needed to be eating the right food as I was growing, I needed to be close to my team-mates, my new school and my new school friends. She made that decision when I was 11 years old and United allowed it.

"That was the reason I ended up going at a younger age to the others, it was to help my mum with her situation and also get me out of the situation we were in.

"So there is always a big element of sacrifice to get to the top level and that's the one we had to make."

Rashford went into further detail about how the household managed a tight budget. 

"My mum, she did the best she could, we used to go to a shop called Pound World and everything was under a pound," he added.

"We would schedule out the week, we would get seven yoghurts and you could have one yoghurt a day and so on. She did the best she could within the circumstances.

"There are some families out there, like mine, that have four or five kids and it is literally impossible for her to take control of the situation.

"This is all going on at a time when kids should be concentrating on school work and stuff like that.

"It is crazy to think this is still going on in 2020 and it's something I don't believe should be happening."

In his letter, Rashford said MPs should "make protecting the lives of some of our most vulnerable a top priority" and "this is not about politics, this is about humanity. Looking at ourselves in the mirror and feeling like we did everything we could to protect those who can't, for whatever reason or circumstance, protect themselves. Political affiliations aside, can we not all agree that no child should be going to bed hungry?"

Rashford added: "It's written from the heart and it's about how my life was at the moment - the letter is to open up and let people understand the impact on families and to know I've done the right thing.

"What families are going through now, I've once had to go through that - and it's very difficult to find a way out. 

"It's very important for me to help people who are struggling. Whether the outcome changes or doesn't change - that's why I wrote it."

Manchester United star Marcus Rashford wrote a personal letter to parliament, asking the United Kingdom government to continue providing free meals for vulnerable children.

Rashford has helped charity FareShare reach its goal of supplying three million meals to vulnerable people in the UK by the end of the June amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The UK government is set to stop a food voucher scheme, which was set up to guarantee meals to children when schools were shut down in March, next month.

United and England forward Rashford published an open letter to members of the House of Commons, calling for the scheme to be extended.

"The Government has taken a 'whatever it takes' approach to the economy – I'm asking you today to extend that same thinking to protecting all vulnerable children across England," the 22-year-old wrote.

"I encourage you to hear their pleas and find your humanity. Please reconsider your decision to cancel the food voucher scheme over the summer holiday and guarantee the extension. This is England in 2020, and this is an issue that needs urgent assistance.

"Please, while the eyes of the nation are on you, make the U-turn and make protecting the lives of some of our most vulnerable a top priority."

"This summer should have been filled with pride once more, parents and children waving their flags," he said. "But, in reality, Wembley Stadium could be filled more than twice with children who have had to skip meals during lockdown - 200,000 children according to Food Foundation estimates.

"As their stomachs grumble, I wonder if those 200,000 children will ever be proud enough of their country to pull on the England national team shirt one day and sing the National Anthem from the stands. Ten years ago, I would have been one of those children, and you would never have heard my voice and seen my determination to become part of the solution.

"… This is not about politics, this is about humanity. Looking at ourselves in the mirror and feeling like we did everything we could to protect those who can't, for whatever reason or circumstance, protect themselves. Political affiliations aside, can we not all agree that no child should be going to bed hungry?

"Food poverty in England is a pandemic that could span generations if we don't course correct now. Whilst 1.3 million children in England are registered for free school meals, one quarter of these children have not been given any support since the school closures were ordered.

"We rely on parents, many of whom have seen their jobs evaporate due to Covid-19, to play substitute teacher during lockdown, hoping that their children are going to be focused enough to learn, with only a small percentage of their nutritional needs met during this period.

"This is a system failure and without education, we're encouraging this cycle of hardship to continue. To put this pandemic in to perspective, from 2018/2019, nine out of 30 children in any given classroom were living in poverty in the UK. This figure is expected to rise by an additional one million by 2022. In England today, 45 per cent of children in Black and minority ethnic groups are now in poverty. This is England in 2020."

Marcus Rashford has changed his attitude to become a "proper leader" for Manchester United, according to Louis Saha.

England striker Rashford was enjoying the most productive season of his career, with 14 goals and four assists in 22 Premier League appearances, prior to suffering a back injury in January.

It was feared he would miss the rest of the season and Euro 2020 but, with the football calendar having been largely suspended for three months due to the coronavirus pandemic, Rashford is now fully fit to play as United prepare to return to action against Tottenham on June 19.

The 22-year-old has also spent the pause in the season championing charitable causes and engaging with fans on social media, with his most significant work seeing him help FareShare provide three million meals to vulnerable people in the United Kingdom.

Former Red Devils forward Saha thinks there has been a shift in the application of United's younger stars, with Rashford showing the qualities of a future captain.

"Yes, I think the attitude, the drive, the actual consistency, all those things are leadership qualities," Saha told Stats Perform News.

"You said that sometimes it's really hard for a striker to lead and, if you do, you need that. You need those three: consistency, drive, and, of course, talent.

"What is very important is having that dedication to actually look around and grab someone who needs to be grabbed and shout at them. All those things are essential.

"They don't have that platform as much as I had when I was playing. I had Roy Keane, Phil Neville, Gary Neville, Rio [Ferdinand], Nemanja Vidic, Patrice Evra, [Paul] Scholes, [Ryan] Giggs, all those players. You could rely on those guys.

"There are definitely four or five players who are very important to Ole Gunnar Solskjaer. I would say that, based on [his] record, he is not young anymore, almost because he started really young.

"He's one of the starters for England. And Rashford, as much as we can compare to Anthony [Martial] has done the same.

"The attitude... I'm not saying they had a bad attitude; they had the attitude that was in line with what Manchester United needed at the time.

"Maybe this attitude was okay when you had leaders around like proper players who win trophies and all that, and it was fine. Maybe I was like this at the time, but I had players to do what I can't do. I had to actually evolve and be a leader.

"When I spoke to Scott McTominay, he was young as well, he had to do it. All those players who made that improvement process for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer were very important, and I think for Rashford, the introduction of [Harry] Maguire was important to give that kind of confidence aspect.

"That's why you give the platform for Rashford to make the difference all the time because he can do it because his work rate is amazing and that thing he maybe missed in one year because maybe he thought 'I've got my position, I'm respected, I've got my status so I don't need to do this or that'.

"Those things can be a bad sign for those playing behind you. Now you can see he is a proper leader."

Manchester United star Marcus Rashford has helped FareShare reach its goal of supplying three million meals to vulnerable people in the United Kingdom by the end of June.

Rashford, 22, has been championed throughout the coronavirus pandemic for his commitment to helping those in need through charitable causes.

The England international has been getting involved in online gaming tournaments for charity and reserving United tickets for workers in the UK's National Health Service.

But arguably his most significant work has been with the charity FareShare, who, with Rashford's help have now reached the point where they will be able to provide a huge number vulnerable people in the UK with food.

He insists there is much work still to be done, though, and pledged to continue helping such causes for as long as there are British children without access to meals.

Writing on his official Twitter account on Thursday, he said: "Guys, I have AMAZING news!! We had a goal that by end of June FareShare would be able to supply 3million meals to vulnerable people across the UK.

"TODAY we have met the financial goal to provide these meals. Thank you all SO much for the support.

"And whilst I'm celebrating this, there is SO much more to do. Trust me when I say, I will keep fighting until no child in the UK has to worry about where their next meal is coming from.

"This is England in 2020 and families need help."

Ander Herrera believes Manchester United have three players who can be ranked alongside the world's best in Paul Pogba, Marcus Rashford and Anthony Martial.

While the debate around United is often based on who their next star signing will be, their former midfielder Herrera feels a trio already in the squad can lead them to Premier League glory.

He feels France star Pogba has the quality to be classed as the world's best midfielder, while forwards Rashford and Martial can also be considered among the top five or 10 players in the game.

"I give you my opinion: I don't know what other players say but he is a midfielder that has everything," Herrera said of Pogba in an interview with The Athletic.

"An NBA athlete with Brazilian feet and the combinations of a Spanish midfielder. He can combine really well – he can do one-two, very quick at high speed. He does have a good attitude.

"If you see other midfielders in the world, they may have some qualities control of the ball, long shots, passes, tackles, box-to-box.

"But Paul can do all of this, plus head the ball, score goals, make recoveries, one against one – everything. But of course, if you want to become the best midfielder in the world, it is about consistency. 

"You have to do it day in, day out. He is a good guy. He wants to do it. He does train well. He has to do it every day."

Paris Saint-Germain midfielder Herrera, who left United in 2019, was similarly positive about his former team-mates Rashford and Martial.

"They have the quality to be among the top 10 in the world," he said of United's young forwards.

"Why do we admire Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo, or [Eden] Hazard, who I also think is one of the best in the world? We admire them because they keep that form for a long time.

"If they do it, they will become, maybe not Messi or Cristiano – because they are unique in the history of football – but they can be top five or top 10.

"But they have to do it for a long time and keep it up. It is the same for Paul.

"Rashford is on his way to doing it and Paul can be the best midfielder in the world if he keeps playing those games where we are all amazed by him. 

"But to keep it at that level is the most difficult thing in football. To keep at it Sunday-Wednesday-Saturday, every time.

"If those three can do that, Manchester United will win the Premier League soon, for sure."

Manchester United duo Paul Pogba and Marcus Rashford featured in a training match at Old Trafford on Saturday.

The duo had been sidelined with long-term injuries before the Premier League campaign was halted in March by the coronavirus pandemic.

Having come through some non-contact sessions unscathed, Pogba (ankle) and Rashford (back) took part in an intra-squad contest at the weekend.

For the Frenchman it was a first outing on home soil since December 26, while Rashford last played at the stadium on January 15.

The friendly kick-about pitted Harry Maguire and Bruno Fernandes as opposing captains under the watchful eye of manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.

United's previous competitive fixture at the so-called 'Theatre of Dreams' was a 2-0 win over rivals Manchester City on March 8.

Solskjaer's side, who sit just three points behind fourth-placed Chelsea, face a trip to Tottenham in their first game back.

All remaining games will be played behind closed doors. 

Marcus Rashford has spoken out in support of the Black Lives Matter campaign, as civil unrest continues in the United States following the death of George Floyd.

Mr Floyd died while in police custody in Minnesota last week, sparking large scale protests and subsequent riots in many cities across the U.S.

On Sunday, Rashford's England team-mate Jadon Sancho celebrated the first of his three goals in Borussia Dortmund's 6-0 win over Paderborn by revealing a t-shirt with the message "Justice for George Floyd".

Now Manchester United star Rashford has used his Twitter account to show his backing for the Black Lives Matter campaign.

"I know you guys haven't heard from me in a few days," Rashford wrote.

"I've been trying to process what is going on in the world. At a time where I've been asking people to come together, work together and be united, we appear to be more divided than ever.

"People are hurting and we need answers. Black lives matter. Black culture matters. Black communities matter. We matter."

Sancho and Rashford are not the only players to have drawn attention to the ongoing situation, with Borussia Monchengladbach forward Marcus Thuram having taken a knee after scoring against Union Berlin on Sunday.

Gladbach coach Marco Rose lauded the 22-year-old for his action, saying Thuram had "set an example against racism."

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