Deposed Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president William Wallace has distanced from any link between himself and former T&T football top man Jack Warner.

Warner, who received a ban from football for life in 2015 and is still facing extradition to the United States on corruption charges, was a known supporter of Wallace ahead of his successful bid to oust former president David John-Williams three months ago.

Speculation has since been rife that an association between Wallace and the former disgraced FIFA officials was one of the reasons the world football governing body disbanded the newly elected TTFA administration.  Wallace was quick to insist, however, that he did not have a close relationship with Warner and indicated as much to FIFA.

 “That is a perceived relationship and one that I don’t have that when it came to the fore, I wrote FIFA, I wrote CONCACAF indicating to CONCACAF that there is no such relationship with Mr. Jack Warner and I guess that if at the end of the day that letter meant nothing then so be it,” Wallace said in an interview with the Good Morning Jojo Sports Show.

Wallace, who was relieved of his duties by FIFA last week, went on to point out that he received solid support from a lot of individuals who wanted change during the election and that he could not control who Warner chose to support.

“We had a host of people supporting us and actually, we won the election 26 votes to 20 votes so it meant that 26 of the delegates supported me along with many other Trinidadians who felt at that point in time that something was definitely wrong with the organisation at that point and they needed a change so as a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago, even though Jack Warner expressed his opinion in terms of there should be change at the association then he has a right to do that, I really can’t stop him from doing that,” he added.

FIFA sent word of its decision to replace the TTFA executive with a normalisation committee two weeks ago in the face of what it described as extremely low overall financial management methods, combined with massive debt.  A surprised Wallace, who pointed to positive meeting with FIFA only a few weeks prior has vowed to fight the decision.

 

 

 

Former FIFA vice Jack Warner has officially been given final approval to appeal extradition proceedings filed against him to the UK Privy Council.

Warner, the disgraced former CONCACAF boss, has been battling to avoid extradition to the United States since 2015.  The ex-football official faces charges of corruption stemming from alleged financial impropriety committed during a long tenure with world football’s governing body. 

Last year, Warner tried and failed to have the extradition appeal dismissed on procedural grounds.  The three judges of Trinidad and Tobago’s Court of Appeal opted to uphold the original decision to dismiss Warner’s review, which was made in September 2017.

Warner, who was also been ordered to pay US$79m in damages to CONCACAF by a federal judge in New York City last summer, is currently out on $TT 2.5m bail and banned for life by FIFA.

The authority to proceed (ATP) with Warner’s extradition as part of the FIFA indictments, was signed in 2016 by Trinidad and Tobago Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi.  Warner is wanted on various counts of corruption, graft, bribery and money laundering.

 

FIFA president Gianni Infantino did not mince words in reference to former FIFA vice president Jack Warner, insisting he had very little regard for the embattled official.

Infantino was recently in Trinidad and Tobago for the opening ceremony of a new hotel at the home of football in Couva.

“A very instrumental, negative figure for football, unfortunately,” was the FIFA President’s blunt assessment of Warner’s legacy when asked by the local media.

“I don’t need to say anything about that.  The courts have spoken about that and will continue to speak about that," he added.

Warner, who was also a former CONCACAF president and special advisor to the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFF), was banned from the sport for life in 2015, in light of his alleged involvement in money laundering and wire fraud.  Warner is currently battling extradition to the United States.  In 2015, the former government minister was one of several other FIFA officials arrested in Zurich before the annual FIFA Congress. 

Earlier this year a United States court ruled that Warner should repay US$79 million that he had fraudulently obtained from CONCACAF.

Former CONCACAF and FIFA vice president Jack Warner is set to take his appeal against extradition to the Privy Council after being granted leave to do.

Warner, the disgraced football official, has been battling to avoid extradition to the United States since 2015.  The ex-football official faces charges of corruption in relation to his time with world football’s governing body.     

Earlier this year, Warner failed to have the extradition appeal dismissed on procedural grounds after a three judges Court of Appeal upheld the original decision to dismiss his judicial review lawsuit, which was made in September 2017.

On Monday, however, three justices set out times frames for the procedural steps that will need to be taken if Warner is to file an appeal.  The terms included paying a fee and settling the record, before final leave can be granted for him to take his case to the court in London.  The extradition proceedings have also been halted in the magistrate's court, pending the hearing and determination of the appeal to the privy council.

Warner is challenging the process by which the extradition proceedings against him are being carried out and seeks to quash the authority to proceed (ATP) which was signed in 2016 by Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi.

Former FIFA vice president Jack Warner has inched closer to extradition to the United States, where he will face charges of corruption, after seeing his appeal dismissed by a Trinidad and Tobago court.

On Tuesday, a three-man appellate court panel dismissed the case put forward by the former CONCACAF boss.  In the suit filed on his behalf, Warner questioned the procedure adopted by the Office of the Attorney General in signing the request for his extradition made in May 2015.

Warner had also challenged the legality of the Extradition (Commonwealth and Foreign Territories) Act, and the treaty signed between Trinidad and Tobago and the US.  In the 40-page ruling issued on Tuesday, however, the justices did not find the extradition request to be in violation of the Act.

“Therefore, the pending extradition proceedings in respect of the appellant before the magistrate are valid,” the judges held, adding that “there was no denial of justice in the issuance of the authority to proceed by the Attorney General.”

The proceedings have, however, been halted for 21 days pending an application from Warner’s legal team to take the issue to the Privy Council.  Warner, who is currently on $TT 2.5m bail, is wanted for a series of fraud-related offences associated with his time as an official of FIFA.

Former FIFA vice-president Jack Warner has hailed ‘building people’ and not buildings as an enduring aspect of his legacy.

Camps, the longest-serving president in the history of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) formerly the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFA), died last week after taking ill during the festive season.

The 87-year-old led the football body between 1992 and 2012, previously managing the 1973 TT team that infamously lost 2-1 to hosts Haiti in the CONCACAF qualifiers, for the 1974 FIFA World Cup in West Germany, and the Strike Squad team that narrowly missed qualification to the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy.

“What he did was to build character, to build people,” Warner said at a funeral service for the former official.

“His legacy was to build people. That is why in the era of Ollie Camps there were so many players having overseas contracts, unlike today,” he added.

Warner expressed his condolences to Camps’ family, including his companion Farida Sanchez and daughter Sandra. Sandra and her cousin Elizabeth Camps delivered the eulogy at the funeral service.

Former FIFA vice president and local football head Jack Warner has lambasted the standard of the Trinidad and Tobago Pro League.

In a wide-ranging interview, which spoke to the overall state of football in the twin-island republic, Warner pointed to the level of play in local football league as a primary concern.  The league has often been plunged into chaos in recent years with players and clubs threatening to take strike action over unpaid wages.

As it stands, the league is heavily reliant on Government subvention and corporate support but it seems Warner is unconvinced of its benefits.

“You can’t expect to be asking how much you going to pay me and you can’t trap a ball, you can’t pass a ball,” Warner told T&T based news source CCN TV6.

“Right now the only thing professional about the T&T Pro League is the name pro.  There’s nothing professional about it.  Who today would pay a dollar to see a player play in the Pro League,” he added.

“Name for me five players in the Pro League who have substance.”

The former football administrator who is currently fighting extradition to the United States relating to corruption charges during his tenure as a FIFA Vice president.

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